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By Crofton Podiatry
February 13, 2019
Category: Pregnant footcare
Tags: swelling   exercise   pregnancy   orthotic  

Are you growing a little one in your belly? Congratulations!

It’s incredible how the body knows to make changes to not only support the weight of the growing baby but also to help prepare for the birthing process. During pregnancy, the heart rate increases, blood flow increases, and soft tissues and bones stretch and shift to make room. As a result of these changes, the mother-to-be’s body can experience a lot of symptoms, like ligament pain, back aches, and swelling hands and feet.

For the feet in particular, here are some things that you can expect (although each woman’s pregnancy can be different):

  • Swelling – As the pregnancy continues, the body might retain more fluid to help become more malleable as needed. The feet can suffer the most obvious swelling because, being the farthest away from the heart, it has a more difficult time returning fluids to the top half of the body. When the baby is larger in the belly, it can physically be the cause of slower circulation back to the top half of the body. Exercise and elevating the feet can help!
  • Pins-and-Needles/Tingling – When there is increased swelling, your nerves might become compressed, and blood flow might be constricted. These can cause you to have a tingling or pins-and-needles sensation. This can be felt more if you’ve been standing all day or if your feet start to swell while you are exercising. Be sure that your shoes are not too tight.
  • Pressure Point and Joint Pain – Certain parts of the feet that experience more pressure can be more sensitive to aches and pains. Elevate the feet and rest them whenever you are sitting to help them recover.
  • Flattened arches – The extra weight that you carry, especially toward the end of the 2nd trimester, and in the 3rd trimester can cause your arches to become stretched out. They can become flattened as the feet work harder to support the weight gain. Wear supportive shoes and/or use orthotic inserts to help reduce pain along the bottom of the feet.

If you are experiencing moderate to severe pain in your feet during pregnancy, see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you figure out the best solution. Pay special attention to any uneven swelling in the legs or feet, as this can indicate an issue with blood clots. To make an appointment, call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
February 06, 2019
Category: skin conditions

Every person’s skin is different. The way they react to the moisture, or lack thereof, can be very different. Some people develop rashes, while others become very itchy and scaly. That’s why there are so many different kinds of moisturizing solutions out there!

The skin on your feet will most likely react the way it does everywhere else on your body. If the air is dry, the parts of your body that are most exposed to the elements are likely to respond by drying out.

Here are some causes for dry feet and what you can do about them:

  • Dry air – Especially in the winter, the air can become dry. With humidity levels dropping, your skin needs more moisture. Apply a moisturizer such as lotions or creams more often than you do during the summer. Additionally, try your best not to expose your skin to dry windy air for too long, as that will make the dryness worse.
  • Overexertion and/or dehydration – Much physical activity can cause your body to overheat resulting in lots of sweating to help you cool down. If you are not hydrated enough, excessive sweating can lead to dry skin, due to dehydration. Make sure that you drink adequate amounts of water each day – about 8 – 8oz glasses per day.
  • Skin conditions – If you have skin issues like eczema or psoriasis, you are more likely to have rashes and/or dry, flaky skin. It can even lead to painfully cracked heel fissures. Be sure to stay on top of moisturizing, and if necessary, topical medications. Drink plenty of water each day.
  • Skin infection – If dry skin is because of an infection like Athlete’s foot, be sure to treat the source of the problem right away. Use over-the-counter antifungal creams at the first sign of symptoms. If they are not effective, come in so that we can prescribe you a stronger treatment.
  • Health conditions – Some health conditions can have a side effect of dry skin. Diabetes is one of the conditions that can lead to dry skin. The lack of circulation can cause problems for bringing necessary fluids and nutrients to nourish your skin. Ask your doctor how you can help your dry skin when you’ve got diabetes.

If you’ve got persistent dry skin and only using moisturizers doesn’t seem to be working, try some of these home remedies to help your dry skin.

  • Set up a nice warm footbath. Soak for at least 10 minutes and then gently scrub areas of dry skin with a pumice stone. Make sure you moisturize your feet after drying them off.
  • Add Epsom salt, apple cider vinegar, or honey to the foot soak. These can help to increase moisture absorption, as well as help keep infections at bay.  
  • Use paraffin wax to seal in moisture while you sleep.

Got persistent dry feet that won’t heal up no matter what you try? Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your dry feet. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 30, 2019
Category: Heel Pain
Tags: running   Plantar Fasciitis   Football   soccer   sneakers  

Once you begin to experience pain along the bottoms of the feet, due to plantar fasciitis, it can become a chronic problem. The pain on the soles of the feet occurs because of inflammation from overstrained ligaments. Each day that the feet have overwork or strain to stabilize the feet in unsupportive shoes, the plantar fascia can become aggravated.

If you have chronic plantar fasciitis that causes you nightly pain, you may want to limit the following activities:

  • Running – The repeated impact on the bottoms of the feet, as well as the strain of running or jogging for long distances, can cause chronic pain. To prevent getting chronic pain from running, make sure you use supportive running shoes with ample cushioning and support. Replace sneakers as soon as they seem to be wearing down. Folks with plantar fasciitis can continue to run as the symptoms usually present at rest. That puts injured runners at risk of worsening symptoms. Instead, at the first sign of symptoms, be sure to treat the condition.
  • Plyometrics – These are activities that incorporate cardiovascular exercise, as well as strength building. It reinforces the fast-twitch muscles in the legs. These exercises include jumping and can aggravate plantar fasciitis each time you land hard on the feet. Box jumps, jump squats, and long jumps are all exercises that can aggravate chronic plantar fasciitis pain.
  • High-impact sports or activities – Like running and plyometrics, any exercise involving high impact on the feet can cause aggravated plantar fasciitis pain. Constant pounding of the grass or pavement, like in football or soccer can cause inflammation of the plantar fascia.

Stretching, icing, massage, and rest are helpful in relieving symptoms related to chronic plantar fasciitis. Wear shoes with lots of cushioning and support to minimize the development of symptoms throughout the day. If you have to, include the use of over-the-counter or custom-made orthotics.

If you feel that your plantar fasciitis pain is becoming worse, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will help you find treatment for your foot pain. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 23, 2019
Category: Fungal toenails

Fungal problems are more common than you think. They can affect many parts of the body, from the tops of your heads to the bottoms of your feet. For the feet, in particular, the most common issues affect the skin and the toenails. In fact, one infection (toenail fungus) can start from another (Athlete’s foot).

Where would you get this fungal infection on your feet?

Some places where you might have picked up the infection include the gym locker room, sharing a towel with someone who has a fungal infection or from the tools at the last pedicure you received. 

Fungus thrives in moist and warm environments. So moisture + a break in the skin of a warm foot = fungal infection. It passes from person to person, foot to foot, and toenail to toenail pretty easily. Once your toenails are infected, they are likely to become discolored, thick, brittle, and develop a smell.

So what can you do to prevent a stubborn fungal toenail infection?

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash every day with soap and warm water to reduce the risk of developing an infection.
  • Do not walk around barefoot in a gym locker room. Wear flip-flops or sandals, especially if you’re using a communal shower.
  • If you are prone to sweating a lot due to hyperhidrosis, bring a pair of socks to change into when your socks have soaked through.
  • You can also use antifungal or foot powder in your socks or shoes to reduce moisture in the shoes. 
  • Do not share nail grooming tools with someone who is infected (or at least be very diligent about disinfecting).
  • Cut your toenails properly. Ingrown toenails can cause breaks in the skin that make you more prone to a fungal infection.
  • Go to a reputable salon for a pedicure. Make sure that you can see how they sterilize their tools. Otherwise, schedule your pedicure for their first appointment of the day to ensure that they are starting the day with freshly cleaned tools on you.
  • If you have Athlete’s foot or other fungal infection on your hands, be sure to clean your hands often before touching your toes. Treat your Athlete’s foot condition promptly to prevent spreading.
  • You may have to stop using nail polish altogether as your toenails will have a harder time recovering from a fungal infection when it cannot breathe (due to polished nails).

These prevention measures should lower the risk of having to deal with fungal toenails. However, if you do somehow get infected, our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, can help you treat the condition with topical or oral medication or painless laser therapy! Request an appointment by calling Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 16, 2019
Category: Seniors Foot Care
Tags: corns   calluses   Orthotics   Ulcers   arthritis   Hammertoes   Diabetic   ingrown   odor   neuromas   foot exams   rashes   exercises   swollen  

As older loved ones age, it’s even more important that caregivers look to taking care of the feet. With age comes many complex health issues, including ones that affect mobility like arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, diabetes, and heart problems. In some cases, the feet can be the first to experience issues associated with many of these problems, even pointing you in the right direction when it comes to a diagnosis.

Here are some ways to care for senior feet and why they are important:

  • Regular hygiene – It’s important to wash the feet with soap and warm water every day to prevent bacterial and fungal infections. If the skin tends to get dry, apply some moisturizer. Keep in mind that even if seniors are not as active, the feet can sweat and develop an unpleasant odor due to bacteria.
  • Frequent foot exams – While helping your loved one wash up, inspect for any new skin issues, like cuts, scrapes, rashes, skin breakdown, or even ulcers. Depending on other health issues he or she might have, their skin may have trouble healing properly, or even feeling that there is a problem. For example, diabetic patients may begin to lose feeling in their feet due to diabetic neuropathy. This is caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the nerves. If you don’t pay attention, a wound can become an infected ulcer, requiring immediate treatment.
  • Proper toenail trimming – Toenails need to be cut straight across. Otherwise, they may become ingrown and cause pain. Additionally, allowing them to get too long can cause them to break and cause pain.
  • Daily exercises – Keeping feet strong and flexible is part of keeping them healthy. Encourage foot exercises, which will help reduce the risk of falls and also increase circulation in the feet. Seniors who are mostly sedentary are prone to swollen feet, and moving the feet can reduce that risk.
  • Make sure the shoes fit – Make sure that they are wearing the correct sized shoes so that they don’t have to worry about painful toe conditions like hammertoes, neuromas, or corns and calluses. If they have a foot deformity requiring special shoes, bring them in to get custom orthotics.

Regular checkups with our podiatrist should also be a part of that care. Remember, the feet can often indicate a larger health issue. Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your older loved ones’ foot conditions. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505