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Posts for category: Foot Injuries

By Crofton Podiatry
July 18, 2018
Category: Foot Injuries

Most folks have endured some type of traumatic injury to the feet, whether by stubbing a toe, dropping a heavy object, or colliding with someone or something while playing sports. The pain can feel excruciating, especially to the top of the feet, where there isn’t much padding around the bones. Go on, feel the top of the feet – you’ll probably feel the long metatarsal bones across the top of your feet.

  • Pain: The immediate sensation you’ll likely feel is pain at the impact spot. The length and severity of the pain will depend on the force of the impact and the surface area injury. Walking or moving the feet can be very painful.
  • Bruise/Contusion: After a bit of time, you might notice some redness and subsequent bruising. Since the visual indication of bruising is a result of bleeding beneath the skin, you may or may not see the typical black and blue of bruising. It will depend on whether or not there is internal bleeding, and where it happens.
  • Bone bruise or hairline fractures: After an injury to bones, blood and fluids can enter and surround the area of the bone. This can happen when the bone is injured, but not enough to become a fracture. On the other hand, severe injury can lead to bone fractures (cracks) in the feet.
  • Inflammation and/or swelling: Depending on the location and severity of the injury, the soft tissues and bone areas can become inflamed or swollen. You may notice a bump from fluids gathering, or pain because of inflammation near nerves. When inflammation affects nerves, it can cause pain in larger areas of the foot (even causing pain to the bottom areas of the foot, due to an injury at the top).
  • Joint swelling: If the injury is at or near a joint, it can cause stiffness, swelling, or tenderness to the joint. It can even be the cause of post-traumatic arthritis.

Pain management after traumatic injury:

  1. RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Additionally, if the pain and inflammation are severe, you can take NSAIDs to reduce symptoms.
  2. If the injury does not get better or gets worse in a couple of days, it’s important to come see us and make sure that bones are not fractured and soft tissues are not torn. Our podiatrist can help you find the best treatment, which may include using a brace or other orthotic device.

We can help you feel better! Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our podiatry team is ready to help improve your foot health at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 04, 2018
Category: Foot Injuries
Tags: swelling   falls   Orthotics   sprains   compression   sports injuries  

Quick! What do you do when you’ve injured your foot or ankle? Do you shake it off? Put some ice on it? Rush off to the emergency room?

Well, let’s start with the type of injury you’ve got and how severe it is. Many injuries, including falls, trips, sprains, bruises, and sports injuries tend to be mild or moderate. In most cases, if you can tolerate the pain or the pain comes and goes, you may not need emergency medical attention. Instead, you may be able to use the RICE method to keep symptoms at bay. Read on to learn more about the first step of treatment after a foot or ankle injury.

(Of course, if you’re not sure, or if symptoms do not get better in a few days, it’s best to seek medical attention.)

What is the RICE method? R = Rest, I = Ice, C = Compression, E = Elevation

After an injury, you may experience pain, redness, bruising, and/or swelling. To keep these symptoms at bay, use the RICE method. You’ll want to REST by stopping what you’re doing and waiting until you heal to get back into walking, running, or playing a sport. If you get back to using your injured foot or ankle too soon, you risk re-injuring it or making things worse. Better to miss out a little now, than to worsen the injury and require more treatment later.

ICING the injury can help reduce pain and swelling. Apply a cold compress to the injury for 15 minutes at a time to get the best results.

Additionally, if you use COMPRESSION socks or bandages around the impacted area, you can prevent excessive swelling as the body tries to protect the injured foot or ankle. It can promote healing by allowing for healthy circulation of blood and fluids.

Finally, whenever you can, ELEVATE the injured body part, also to promote circulation and reduce excessive swelling. If possible, raise the foot or ankle above heart level when you are lying down, and propped up a bit when sitting.

An injury doesn’t have to make you stop everything – but you should listen to your body and slow down. If you need better shoes or orthotics to support your feet, or if your mild injury seems to feel worse even when you apply RICE, make an appointment to come see us. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your injury and prescribe the proper treatment. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

When actors take the stage, you commonly hear “break a leg”. For dancers, however, there’s an obvious reason why you would not say “break a leg”. This could mean a huge recovery period and possibly the end of their career. A dancer’s livelihood depends on healthy legs, ankles, and feet. That’s why although they may not discuss the topic amongst themselves anymore, they all understand the importance of caring for their overused, disfigured and often injured feet.

 

If you have injuries from recreational or professional dancing, seeing your podiatrist often is beneficial to maintaining good foot health. Our board-certified foot and ankle doctor, Brad Toll, DPM will help you find the best way to continuously care for your feet.

 

Common foot problems experienced by dancers

 

There are many foot and ankle injuries that dancers experience, including: Achilles Tendonitis or Injury, Ankle Sprains, Stress Fractures, Corns and Calluses, Fractures, Hammertoes, Heel Spurs (Plantar Fasciitis), Ingrown Toenails, Turf Toe, and Metatarsalgia. The following are the most common:

 

1. Hallux Rigidus or Limitus – You may feel pain or be unable to move at the joints of the big toe. The joints can rub together and become inflamed or degenerate the joint. Dancers should ice and relieve inflammation. Taping the toes can reduce further issues.

 

2. Bunions – Foot pain can be felt in the big toe or the ball of the foot. Repeated positions, postures, and other combinatory injuries can cause bunions at the big toe joint. Dancers should keep aware of any deformities and pain since untreated bunions could even require surgical interventions.

 

3. Metatarsalgia – There is pain and tenderness to the touch at the ball of the foot. This is commonly caused by extreme force on the smaller toes. The constant overstretching can cause instability in the joints and cause sharp pains. Strengthening the muscles that control the small toes can be helpful in preventing or treating metatarsalgia. Orthotic inserts can help relieve the pressures on the ball of the foot when walking.

 

4. Plantar Fasciitis or Heel Spurs – The soles and heel of the foot can feel painful when overusing the tissues of the plantar fascia. The tissue becomes inflamed and painful, especially when there is tightness in the calf muscles or Achilles tendon. Use physical therapy to release tight tissues, stretch, and take anti-inflammatories if necessary.

 

5. Sesamoiditis – The tendon between the sesamoid bones can become inflamed when you are on the balls of your feet often. Pain is felt under the big toe, and also while bending the toe. Resting as much as possible to reduce pain and inflammation is recommended. If pain is chronic or very sharp, you may want to take X-rays to be sure the bones are not fractured.

 

As a dancer, it is wise to treat any issues early and often since repeated and untreated injury can lead to more severe issues. Our team at Crofton Podiatry will do their best to care for your feet and ankles, which are essential to your dance career. Make an appointment today by calling our office (410)721-4505 in Crofton, MD.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
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