(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for category: sports injuries

By Crofton Podiatry
April 09, 2019
Category: sports injuries

With more and more activity coming this Spring, athletes often develop foot problems. Three of the most common include Turf Toe, Stress fractures and Tarsal Tunnel syndrome

Turf Toe

Turf toe is a sprain of the big toe from excessive upward bending of the big toe. Jamming the toe or repeated push-offs when running or jumping can also cause Turf Toe. Sports such as basketball, running, football, tennis, soccer, wrestling, dancing and gymnastics are often prone to this. Turf toe is common on artificial turf.

Treatment for Turf Toe includes:

  • Rest – Temporarily stopping the activity causing the pain.
  • Ice – putting ice on the affected area for 20 to 30 minutes 3 times a day until the pain disappears.
  • Compression and elevation – wrapping the toe to stabilize and support it and keeping it elevated above your heart when at rest.
  • Surgery – in the most extreme cases surgery may be needed.

Stress fractures are caused by sudden force which causes a split in the bones. Fractures can also occur with repeated lower force trauma to the foot. Poor diet and menstrual irregularities can also contribute to fractures as do bulimia and anorexia since they all affect bone health.

Treatment for a Stress fracture includes:

  • Rest – Stopping your activity will allow your fracture to heal.
  • Ice – place ice on the effected area the recommended 20 to 30 minutes, 3 times a day until better.
  • Better fitting footwear – wear footwear that strongly supports your feet.
  • Increase activity slowly – when healed do not rush back to the same level of activity. Slowly build your workout according to how you feel.

The third condition athletes can suffer from is Tarsal Tunnel syndrome. Tarsal Tunnel is when the posterior tibial nerve in the space between your bones and tissue is pinched causing the base of your foot to go numb.

Treatment includes:

  • Pain meds – anti-inflammatory medicine.
  • Cortisone – shots of this pain reliever in the foot.
  • Better fitting footwear – Wearing more supportive footwear. See your podiatrist for recommendations.
  • Surgery –a podiatrist will cut the tarsal tunnel and relieve pressure on the tibial nerve.

What is good about these is that they can all be successfully treated with a visit to your podiatrist.

If you believe you may any of the above conditions or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

 

The World Cup is upon us! For all the soccer fans out there, it’s an exciting time to get together and watch the talented international superstars face off each other. After opening ceremonies, it might even stir up some inspiration to go out and score some of your own goals as well.

As a fan, you might have concerns about some of the previous injuries that some of the soccer players (footballers) have incurred. They might affect whether or not they get to participate. For example, we know that Brazil’s Dani Alves is already out of the world cup due to a knee injury, while Neymar’s future is also uncertain after his broken foot in March. He’s been seen to join in on practice, but we’ll see what happens!

So what are some common soccer foot injuries we should be on the lookout for during the world cup?

  • Ankle sprains - Ranging from mild to severe (Grade I to III), ligaments can become injured (or even torn) while running, jumping, twisting, or when there is a collision between soccer players.
  • Fractures and broken bones - When there is traumatic impact or repetitive stress on the foot or ankle bones, the bone is subject to pressure that can make the bones crack or break.
  • Sever’s Disease - Commonly affecting active children, a sports injury due to impact can cause problems with the growth plate of the heel bone.
  • Overuse injuries - There are certain injuries that can develop due to repetitive motions and strains on the feet and ankles, such as pushing off the forefoot for sprinting. These are called overuse injuries and include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and sesamoiditis.

Let’s hope that none of these injuries appear during the World Cup, but it’s not unlikely, given that our soccer players will be playing their hearts out!

If you have sustained a foot or ankle sports injury in all the excitement of the World Cup, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2018
Category: sports injuries

There are so many things to consider for your March Madness picks – how the teams have played in during their season, star athletes, and the team’s history in these postseason matchups. Now take a step back and take into consideration, the foot and ankle injuries that have plagued each team, and how that might affect your bracket picks.

Kentucky’s Jarred Vanderbilt, for example, was out with an ankle injury, and continued limping, several days later. Depending on the type of injury, ankles can heal quickly, but others can take as long as 6 weeks or more to heal, especially if it’s a severe ankle sprain.

Kansas State’s Dean Wade and Miami’s Bruce Brown, Jr. are both suffering from foot injuries that leave them in much uncertainty heading into the first few games. There’s a good chance they will have to sit out as their injuries heal and they are cleared to participate.

While you might have noticed that some of the previously injured college basketball stars are “healed” from their injuries, we want to caution you from getting your hopes too high. Most foot, ankle, and knee injuries may eventually feel good enough to play, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are fully healed. It’s actually in these “almost 100%” times that a more serious re-injury can occur. Rehabilitative measures, such as an ankle brace and physical therapy might be necessary to get athletes back to 100%.

Depending on the severity of the injuries the athletes incur, they may need many weeks of rest, immobilization, or even surgery to ensure that they have a future career, even beyond the NCAA tournament.

Got inspired by March Madness and went to play some pickup basketball? For mild or moderate injuries, request an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry can assess your injury and find you the right treatment. Our friendly podiatric team looks forward to seeing you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 31, 2018
Category: sports injuries

It’s official – The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots will go head to head for the Vince Lombardi Trophy!

While talent, hard work, and teamwork are major factors that will determine who wins, injuries can end up really changing the outcome. Below, we discuss some common football injuries to watch for as you’re rooting for your team of choice:

  • Knee Injuries – The most common football injuries include tears in the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament), and/or the meniscus. These can come from blunt lateral impact or quick jukes, during which you may hear a “pop” from the knee. If injuries are severe enough, it can take the athletes out of the game or even the majority of the season as surgery and rehabilitation may be required.
  • Shoulder Injuries – A tackle, collision, or fall on the shoulder or arm can lead to a serious shoulder injury. Even if football players wear shoulder pads, they can still experience shoulder dislocations or separations in the rotator cuffs. Depending on the severity of the injury, it can take a long time to allow the injury to heal and renew flexibility and strength.
  • Ankle Injuries – Because of the many directions in which the ankle moves, there are many tendons and ligaments involved in the players’ actions, which also means that jumping, running, juking, or opponents’ tackles can cause ankle injuries like sprains or broken ankles. Overuse injuries like Achilles tendonitis can also cause chronic pain that can get worse without proper treatment (maybe even surgery) and healing time. Ankle braces are helpful for those that have repeat injuries.
  • Foot Injuries – Toes, the midfoot (metatarsal), and the heel bones are also at high risk of blunt trauma and overuse injuries. With the constant forces on the feet, football players can endure black toenails as well as bone fractures

So whichever team you’re rooting for, let’s hope that someone on that team doesn’t sustain an injury that takes him out of the championship game! If you get inspired to play a pickup game, be sure to take safety measures and warm up. Worried about an injury? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. You can consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment and treatment. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 03, 2018
Category: sports injuries
Tags: swelling   fractures   stretch   injuries   frostbite   sprain   black toenails  

It’s peak skiing and snowboarding season! If you haven’t already, you’re probably dusting off your gear and making sure that everything still works and fits correctly. And please, don’t forget this step! Many folks suffer from injuries each year while skiing or snowboarding due to improper use of equipment, ill-fitting boots, and not using safety gear.

Consider the following safety guidelines to keep you and your family safe while skiing or snowboarding:

Dress Warmly

  • Always wear layers and cover as much skin as possible. Gloves, socks, and a hat will keep you warm, especially when it is really cold and snowy. Bring extra socks to change into in case they get wet or sweaty.
  • It’s best if things can be waterproof so that you don’t risk getting your hands or feet wet, and then having them come into contact with snow or ice. That could lead to frostbite!

Use Protective Gear

  • Make sure you know how to use each piece of equipment properly. If you don’t know how the bootstraps tighten or loosen, or how to get out of skis once you are clipped in, ask a more experienced skier.
  • Use helmets, even if you’re a professional. You just never know what kind of accident might lead to hitting your head on ice, rocks or poles.
  • If you’re a beginner (especially in snowboarding), you may want to get knee, butt, and/or wrist pads for slips and falls to protect from injury and even fractures.

Prepare Your Feet

  • If you have to, try on multiple sizes of skiing or snowboarding boots to make sure they fit properly. While they must be snug, they should not cut off circulation to your feet and toes (which could lead to irritation on the skin, swelling, and bruises). If they are too loose, your feet and ankles will have to strain to give you the proper control over your skis or snowboard (and you can twist or sprain your ankle).
  • Make sure your toenails are trimmed so that they do not experience excessive pressure from the boots, which could lead to painful black toenails.
  • Stretch your toes, feet, and ankles before your skiing or snowboarding session to reduce risk of injury and warm them up before putting them to use.

Have you had an injury while participating in a winter sport? Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry to get the right treatment for your injury. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is prepared for quality assistance at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

 




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505