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Posts for: May, 2017

By Crofton Podiatry
May 25, 2017
Category: Foot Pain

Have you ever wondered why your feet get swollen? One minute your feet fit into your shoes normally, but later that day, they feel tighter or you can’t even get them on! Maybe they feel heavier or even numb. What’s going on?

Swelling of the feet, ankles, and legs is also called Peripheral Edema. It can happen to anyone, for a variety of reasons. They can be short- or long-term occurrences, happen on one or both sides, and may or may not be painful, depending on the cause of swelling. While not always caused by a serious problem, swollen feet can indicate a more serious underlying problem. The following are possible reasons for swollen feet:

  • Being Overweight, Standing for long periods of time, or Inactivity – These conditions can cause blood and fluid to have a hard time returning up to the upper part of the body. Having regular periods of activity can increase blood flow and circulation to prevent or reduce swelling in the lower part of the body.

  • Hormonal Changes, including Menstrual Periods or Pregnancy – Your body reacts to hormonal changes to try to protect you. Retaining fluid during pregnancy can be normal, as long as it is not extreme or uneven. If you have severe edema or swelling only on one foot or leg, it may be a sign of something more serious. Contact your doctor.

  • Insect Bite or Allergic Reaction – Swelling can happen as a result of these events. If swelling does not go down, use allergy medications and go to the emergency room if reaction is severe.

  • Medication or Medical Procedure Side Effect – Some medications can cause changes in the body, such as hormonal changes or causing blood to thicken. Blood or fluid can thicken and cause edema. Additionally, procedures like surgery can cause inflammation and swelling.

  • Foot or Ankle Injury – Swelling is a normal reaction to injuries as a protective measure. Use the RICE method to reduce swelling. (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevate the leg)

  • Infection – Swelling can occur when you have an infection – look for symptoms like redness, pain, or an open wound.

  • Venous Insufficiency including Blood Clot and varicose veins – Vein disorders can cause inadequate blood flow through the veins. They cause the blood to pool at the restrictive point or blockage, causing swelling. Blood clots and varicose veins are the common causes.

  • Lymphedema  – This condition is when there is damage to lymph nodes in your lymphatic system. It causes a blockage to fluids which build up and cause swelling.
     
  • Heart, Liver, or Kidney Disease – When there are problems with these organs, your body may have a reaction of swelling near the feet or ankles due to fluid buildup.

Do you have concerns about swelling in your feet or ankles? Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to get an assessment to make sure that the swelling is not an indication of something more serious. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
May 18, 2017
Category: Foot Care Tips
Tags: walking   steps  

Walking is the best exercise for your feet. It is safer than many other sports, but the benefits can be similar. However, getting steps in isn’t always easy or necessarily fun. So how do you incorporate more activity into your day? Here are some creative and sneaky tips for reaching your step count goals!

Don’t be afraid to ask for help:

  • Use a pedometer or activity tracker. If you don’t have one, you can get one pretty easily. It doesn’t have to be fancy; it just needs to tell you the number of steps you’ve taken. It surely beats having to manually count your steps!

  • Set reasonable goals and have accountability. Start slow and low and increase as you get more comfortable with walking. Additionally, try to partner with a buddy or online group so that people will keep you motivated and accountable for reaching for your goals.

Trick yourself into taking more steps:

  • “Forget” to bring something from upstairs or from another room. Don’t necessarily wait to need multiple items to go to another area. If you’re cleaning, apply the cleaning spray and then walk back to get paper towels. Not only will you let the spray work a bit longer, you’ll work in more steps!

  • Park far way from where you need to go. Not only will finding a spot be easier, you’ll have to put in more steps!

Work at a desk all day? Find excuses to move:

  • Get a smaller cup for water or other drinks so that you have to go back to the kitchen for a refill. Remember to drink plenty of water each day to stay well-hydrated!

  • Use the bathroom at the other end of the hall instead of the one closest to you.

  • Got a meeting on a different floor? If it’s possible, take the steps to that next meeting.

  • Instead of calling or messaging your coworker, walk over to their desk. Get some facetime and increase your step count!

Do you have problems walking or reaching your step count due to pain? Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to get assessed and properly treated so that we can keep you stepping. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
May 10, 2017
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Untagged

Have you had pain in your toes? Maybe you experience numbness or tingling after wearing some tight shoes or after activities like football or soccer. You may be suffering from a neuroma.

What is a neuroma? Neuromas in the feet occur because of thickened tissue rubbing against nerves. The nerves become irritated and enlarged causing pain and inflammation, especially between the third and fourth toes. The ball of the foot can experience numbness, tingling, burning, or pain because of this. Neuromas can be caused by external pressure from shoes, injury, or developmental abnormalities.

What are your Treatment Options? The following are possible treatments, depending on the severity of your nerve pain:

  • Roomier, Lower-heeled Footwear – When shoes are tight on the toes or if there is too much pressure on the front of the feet from wearing high heels. Shoes that have a bigger toe box and low heels can help reduce pressure on the toes and ball of feet.

  • Corrective Shoes or Orthotics – Shoes or inserts that change the position of the feet to relieve pressure or pain on the front of the feet. Arch supports and foot pads can make a difference in reducing pressure on the nerves.

  • Cortisone Injections – When there is pain, injections of corticosteroid medications can reduce swelling or inflammation on the nerves.

  • Decompression surgery – Nearby structures, such as the ligament can be cut or removed to release pressure on the nerve.

  • Neurolysis  – When nerve pain is severe a treatment option is to harden the nerves using an injection of ethanol and anesthetic to harden the nerves and ultimately destroy it and relieve symptoms.  

  • Nerve Surgery – Another option when the pain is severe is to perform surgery either to remove the nerve tissue or to relieve pressure on the nerve.

Do you have nerve pain on the front of the foot? Or perhaps you’re not sure if it may be related to diabetic neuropathy? Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to get assessed and properly treated. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
May 04, 2017
Category: Bunion
Tags: Bunion   Hammertoes  

Have you noticed pain or a bump on the inside of the big toe joint? You may have a bunion. Also known as hallux valgus, a bunion is a bony protrusion, which makes the big toe lean toward the second toe. This can happen due to constant pressure on the big toe joint, whether it be from tight shoes, deformities, or injury. Symptoms can include: pain, redness, inflammation, callus or corn on the bump, and stiffness in the big toe. Your feet may feel more discomfort in your shoes, requiring you to buy footwear with a bigger toebox.

Non-Surgical Treatment Options

Leaving bunions untreated can make the growth bigger and complicate the problem. It can cause higher risk for bursitis, hammertoes, arthritis, and even cause deformity in your feet. If the issue becomes severe enough, you may even need surgery to fix the problem. For most, however, surgery is not required. Some treatment options include:

  • Icing – If there is swelling and/or pain from your bunions, you can use an ice pack or cold compress for 15-20 minutes, several times a day to relieve it.
  • Padding – There are bunion pads available to purchase at drugstores or pharmacies to cushion the bunions from further pressure or irritation.
  • Medication – NSAIDs (Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) can help with reducing inflammation and/or pain. If you need to take these medications, make sure to follow the recommended dosing.
  • Replacement Footwear – You may need to buy new shoes that better fit your feet. With bunion development, there’s a good chance that your big toe joint has pressure on it from current footwear. With bunions, the front of the shoes will need more room.
  • Orthotics (custom, if necessary) – Some shoe inserts can help take pressure off the bunion. There are also toe spacers that will keep the big toe straighter, and prevent from pushing into your second toe.

Got bunion pain? Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to get assessed and properly treated. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

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