(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for: February, 2018

By Crofton Podiatry
February 21, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear

There are certain habits that are picked up without realizing it. Picking at scabs, shaking your legs while sitting, saying “like,” and not signaling when you change lanes in your car are all bad habits that you might pick up without consciously trying to do them.

Likewise, there may be some bad habits that you may have picked up regarding your shoes. The following are unconscious actions you might be doing that could be harming your shoe (and therefore your foot and ankle health):

  • Wearing the same shoes each day – If you have a pair of shoes that you wear each day, such as work shoes or walking shoes, there’s a good chance that you’ve developed at least a little bit of a funky smell in them. That’s because bacteria and mold love to grow in moist and warm places, such as in your footwear. As you sweat throughout the day, the microorganisms thrive and can survive long after you’ve taken them off. To help reduce odor and even breakdown of the shoes, rotate the shoes you wear each day. You may even need to buy two of the same pair of shoes if you really need to wear those particular ones. 
  • Putting them away as soon as you get home – This can perpetuate the above mentioned bacterial and fungal growth in the shoes, as they don’t get a chance to air out and dry out. Get in the habit of leaving them out overnight and putting shoes away before you leave for work in the morning. Or better yet, leave them out until you get back after work later that day.
  • Not wearing socks with shoes – Some people get into this habit out of convenience or the idea that certain shoes do not need socks. However, any enclosed shoes would benefit from socks as a barrier between the inner lining and your feet. Socks can absorb the moisture that would otherwise go into your shoes; they also protect the inner lining of the shoes from features of your feet, such as long toenails. TIP: If you’ve got hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), change your socks at least once midday.
  • Folding the back of the shoes – When you’re just running out to grab something from the car or get the mail, you might just slip your feet into shoes and fold the back like a slipper. It makes easier to get in and out of the shoes. However, not only are you breaking the structure of the shoe, you’re also wearing down the rubber soles of your shoes since it’s more likely to be dragging on the ground. Proper heel cupping in the shoes is important to preventing some overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Dragging your feet when you walk – Some of you might be more inclined to drag your feet when wearing certain shoes like fur-lined boots or certain sandals. That could really wear down the outer soles of the shoes, causing problems with the structural integrity and support your feet and ankles get. Pay attention to your gait.
  • You wear high heels, flats, or other uncomfortable shoes every day – You may have become a pro at wearing certain shoes each day, but high heels, flats, and pointed-toe shoes can all end up causing you problems. They all lack supportive features and make your feet work harder than they need to. If you MUST wear these uncomfortable shoes, at least try to change out of them as soon as you leave the office since you may develop bunions or metatarsalgia otherwise.
  • Wearing shoes too long – This is not a habit, per say, but something you’ve been resisting. You may have a favorite pair of shoes that you want to wear until you can’t, but it could leave you with more pain than joy. If you really want to extend the life of your shoes, consider wearing them with orthotic inserts to maintain support for your feet.

Do you think you might have foot or ankle problems because of bad shoe habits? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can help you with an assessment and treatment if needed. For dedicated care for your feet and ankles, visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
February 14, 2018
Category: Feet Protection

Many wellness experts have said that sitting at your desk all day can have the same effects as smoking and can increase the risk of early death. So are standing desks the answer? Read on to see if they would be right for you!

Pros of Standing Desks:

  • Increased likelihood of movement, more often during the workday. Sitting and standing still for long periods of time can lead to health problems, including varicose veins, decreased circulation, and diabetes. However, if you’re already standing, it is more likely that you will stretch and walk around more often than if you’re complacently sitting.
  • More energy and ability to focus on work. Those who regularly use standing desks have reported that they are better able to focus and stay attentive to work when standing vs. sitting.
  • Reduced back pain – that is, if you can maintain good posture. Many times, when you sit for long periods of time, you tend to conform to poor posture, with your back and shoulders slumped forward and down. When you stand, with good posture (which can be forced by the positioning of the desk, keyboard, and monitor).

Cons of Standing Desks:

  • You may end up standing too still or getting tired and slouching. Often, you can see office workers end up leaning on the desk with one arm. At this point, you should either reset your posture and stretch, or take a break and lower the desk to sitting for a bit. While it may be cumbersome, alternating between sitting and standing can also be a solution for good posture and movement.
  • If you don’t have good posture or stand on your feet for too long, it may not be comfortable for your feet. Because everyone’s feet are different, each person will need different levels of support under his or her feet, which can include a standing mat as well as orthotic cushioning in the shoes. Those with certain overuse conditions, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis, bunions or metatarsalgia can experience pain from long-term standing without appropriate support.

Do your best to get up and move around for every 30 minutes that you sit. If you feel that your mobility is limited by foot or ankle problems, or if you need extra support while using a standing desk, make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment and treatment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


Have you found a valentine yet? What are your plans to give them the ultimate Valentine’s Day? If you need ideas, start with their feet.

Wait, it may sound silly, but hear us out! Haven’t you ever had a long day of standing or walking, leaving you with achy feet? If only you had someone to give you a nice foot rub to help you wind down…

While a chocolate, flowers, and a fancy dinner are wonderful and almost expected for most couples, try focusing on the feet to get to the heart:

  • Swap out high heels and oxfords or loafers for softly cushioned slippers. A nice night out may have meant squeezing your feet into uncomfortable formal shoes.
  • Schedule in a foot soak. It’s an easy way to start the foot pampering session. For tired or sore feet, add Epsom salts and any essential oils your partner might like. To add some extra romantic vibes, throw in some rose petals.
  • Afterwards, you can roll your sleeves up, grab some lotion, and give your partner a nice foot rub. Key massage points include: below the big toe joint, plantar fascia (the band of tissue that shows up when you pull the big toe back), the arch, and the back of the heel and ankle. These spots are particularly soothing for those who suffer from plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis,
  • You can also just do both the soak and rub in one go by scheduling a pedicure where you can both enjoy some pampering, minus the work.
  • End the experience by snuggling up by a fire or by keeping your feet in a foot-warming blanket. Just be careful not to burn your feet, especially if you or your partner have diabetes and have lost feeling due to diabetic neuropathy.

If either of you has foot concerns or maybe feel embarrassed about foot odor or foot fungus, make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. We can help you feel better about your feet! Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment and treatment, if needed. Visit our dedicated and friendly team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.





Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505