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Posts for: March, 2018

By Crofton Podiatry
March 28, 2018
Category: Pregnant footcare
Tags: Orthotics   yoga   pregnancy   cycling  

With pregnancy comes a lot of DOs and DON’Ts. DO take prenatal vitamins! DON’T eat sushi! DO exercise, but DON’T do too much! What’s a pregnant mama to do?

At Crofton Podiatry, we know that it can get pretty confusing when it comes to maintaining a healthy pregnancy. We’ve collected some tips on what to expect when it comes to “pregnancy feet” as well as exercises you can do to stay active and relieve swelling.

What to Expect for your feet:

  • Pregnant women will most likely see swelling in the lower half of the body. As the body softens to prepare for expansion, it retains more water in the skin and bones. In addition, the growing baby takes up space, reducing the flow rate of blood and fluids back to the upper half of the body. 
  • Don’t be alarmed if your shoes do not fit, especially in the latter half of the day. Wear comfortable shoes during the day, taking breaks to sit and elevate the feet as often as you can.
  • Watch for signs of uneven swelling as this can indicate a clot, which needs immediate medical attention.

Exercises for your “pregnancy feet”:

  • It’s great for your body and your baby if you stay physically active throughout your pregnancy. Do not start or increase the amount you exercise, but if you have been physically active, continue this healthy habit.
  • Take walks – this can help you increase overall body circulation as your leg muscles and heart muscles pump blood and fluids up and around your body.
  • Water aerobics – this is one of the best ways to get full body exercise without the strain of carrying the full amount of the baby’s weight. It will reduce strain on your back as you exercises.
  • Foot exercises – Flex and point the feet, rotate the ankles and do some toe scrunches to get the feet active. You can do this while sitting on a chair, but even better if you can sit on the floor with your legs out in front of you and your hands on the floor behind you to support you.
  • Yoga – There are several poses that are safe to do while you are pregnant. If you are not sure, it’s best to go to a prenatal yoga class to get the benefits of stretching, strengthening, and balance poses to increase circulation and get your heart pumping a bit.
  • Cycling – This is a great low-impact cardiovascular exercise.
  • Dancing – Some mild dance aerobics classes are also good for you, as long as you don’t feel a strain in your legs or back.

We certainly encourage you to stay physically active, but only do what feels comfortable for you. If you notice excessive swelling or have problems in your feet or ankles, make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you with custom orthotics during your pregnancy. Our podiatry team in Crofton, MD serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2018
Category: sports injuries

There are so many things to consider for your March Madness picks – how the teams have played in during their season, star athletes, and the team’s history in these postseason matchups. Now take a step back and take into consideration, the foot and ankle injuries that have plagued each team, and how that might affect your bracket picks.

Kentucky’s Jarred Vanderbilt, for example, was out with an ankle injury, and continued limping, several days later. Depending on the type of injury, ankles can heal quickly, but others can take as long as 6 weeks or more to heal, especially if it’s a severe ankle sprain.

Kansas State’s Dean Wade and Miami’s Bruce Brown, Jr. are both suffering from foot injuries that leave them in much uncertainty heading into the first few games. There’s a good chance they will have to sit out as their injuries heal and they are cleared to participate.

While you might have noticed that some of the previously injured college basketball stars are “healed” from their injuries, we want to caution you from getting your hopes too high. Most foot, ankle, and knee injuries may eventually feel good enough to play, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are fully healed. It’s actually in these “almost 100%” times that a more serious re-injury can occur. Rehabilitative measures, such as an ankle brace and physical therapy might be necessary to get athletes back to 100%.

Depending on the severity of the injuries the athletes incur, they may need many weeks of rest, immobilization, or even surgery to ensure that they have a future career, even beyond the NCAA tournament.

Got inspired by March Madness and went to play some pickup basketball? For mild or moderate injuries, request an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry can assess your injury and find you the right treatment. Our friendly podiatric team looks forward to seeing you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.


In our last post, we spoke about when you should replace the shoes that you wear so that they will not cause harm to your feet. Now, we’d like to talk about a particular type of shoes (high heels) and how they can affect your foot health.

Whether it’s for work, going out to dinner, dancing, or special events, women have specific foot issues that can be aggravated by or attributed to wearing high heels on an almost-daily basis. The higher the heel of the shoes, the more pressure is placed on the forefoot. The midfoot, balls of the feet, and toes have to endure more strain, leading to more problems such as metatarsalgia, hammertoes, Morton’s neuroma, and/or bunions. Additionally, the tendons and ligaments along the foot and ankles must work harder to keep you stabilized throughout the day.

What’s worse, the high heels make your feet and ankles act like they are walking downhill all day. This means more strain (and therefore, pain) on the calves, knees, and back, throwing your alignment out of whack. So if you have been having back, neck, or shoulder pain, it may be caused by your shoes!

So then, what are my options?

  • If you feel that you have to wear high heels, try to find ways to get out of them periodically. You can take them off while you’re sitting at your desk, while driving, and while commuting. It will help reduce the risk of repetitive stress on the feet, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Also, as often as you can, stretch your feet and toes to release from their cramped environment. Doing a deep calf stretch, including pulling the toes back will be beneficial for your entire foot.
  • When you purchase high-heeled shoes, do your best to try them on and walk around in them for a bit to see if they feel comfortable. We would advise against assuming that shoes will break in. Pointy-toe shoes can squeeze your toes into uncomfortable positions, adding force to the big toe joint and directly onto the toes. Look for a wider toe box and a shoe that follows the natural curves of your feet. A thicker/chunkier heel will help with stabilization and balance, as will a good fit. Don’t buy shoes that are a little bit big or small – it has to fit well to reduce the risk of foot pain.
  • If your high heels seem comfortable but could use a bit of support, orthotic inserts, such as for the arches or the balls of your feet, you may experience less strain on the feet.

Do you have foot pain from wearing high heels on a daily basis? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you create custom orthotics. Contact our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
March 06, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear

You may not realize it, but shoes have a lifespan. Depending on what they are used for and how often they are used, shoes may need to be replaced as often as every 3 to 4 months!

Why is it important to get new shoes?

Maybe it’s because you love to shop for and collect footwear, or maybe you’re an avid runner. Regardless of why you get new shoes, there is a good foot health reason for getting new shoes. Yes, there IS an actual excuse to go shoe shopping!

When you first purchase shoes, the material is usually rigid, there is plenty of cushioning on the insole, and the outer rubber sole provides a lot of traction. Over time, however, the materials can become softer and worn down. The insoles no longer support you the way they once did, and you might feel more impact with every step you take.

Worn down shoes can begin to cause you problems if you do not replace them (or at least remedy them with orthotic inserts). When shoes lose their supportive features, your feet have to strain to stabilize you as you walk or run. The repetitive and long-term strain on your feet or ankles can lead to painful issues such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Furthermore, if you keep wearing your favorite pair of shoes until they are falling apart, you could also be risking bacterial or fungal growth in the material, which can lead to foot odor or skin disease.

When should I get new shoes?

Look for some of these signs for the right time to replace shoes:

  • If shoes no longer feel snug on your feet, no matter how tightly you tie the shoelaces, they are probably losing structural support.
  • If you can no longer feel cushion in the inner soles, you need to get new shoes or add orthotic inserts.
  • If the tread on your shoes (especially hiking shoes) is reduced, and you seem to slip on dirt trails, you should get new shoes to prevent injury.
  • If the shoes no longer support your arches, allowing them to fall flat when you walk, it’s time to replace them.
  • If your heels slip around in your shoes, the heel cups are too worn down.

Remember to buy shoes that are comfortable and supportive when you try them on in the store. You shouldn’t rely on them to “break in” and get more comfortable later, as some materials do not allow for it.

Having trouble finding shoes that support your foot needs? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you with custom orthotics. Come see our friendly podiatric team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505