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Posts for: April, 2018

By Crofton Podiatry
April 25, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear

Depending on the type of work you do, you may be required to wear specific types of shoes. Construction workers might need to wear heavy-duty boots, while nurses need to wear safety shoes to protect themselves from needles and other hazards. And while safety comes first, does that mean you should sacrifice on foot comfort and health?

While most work shoes do have some level of comfort and support built in, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s enough for your feet. This is especially true when your work shoes begin to wear down. 

The following are tips for making sure that your work shoes are working for YOU:

  • Make sure you have enough arch and heel support. This will prevent painful symptoms for people who have flat feet or tend to overpronate. Good heel cups help you keep your feet stable so that the Achilles’ tendon does not have to become strained.
  • Check the level of cushioning. Press down on the inner soles of the shoes every now and then to make sure that you still have cushioning to absorb impact to the bones and joints in the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.
  • Buy anti-slip outer soles. Work shoes should have adequate tread to make sure that you are not at high risk for slipping on clean floors or on wet, slick surfaces. 
  • Get measured each time you buy work shoes. The best time to buy shoes, especially work shoes (which you will spend 35+ hours wearing each week), is in the afternoon, when your feet are a bit swollen from walking or standing during the day. 
  • Avoid shoes that make your feet feel cramped. Shoes with tight toe boxes do not always “break in”. Scrunching your feet into shoes that feel cramped are more likely to leave you with worse symptoms of bunions, blisters, or hammertoes.
  • Look for signs of wearing out or breaking down. If they look or feel like they are worn down, they probably are. If the insole or outer sole is very much reduced from when you first bought the work shoes, it’s a sign that your shoes are not working for you. Additionally, if there are cuts, scrapes, or broken parts of the shoes, it’s definitely time to replace the shoes.
  • Replace shoes approximately every 6 months. Typically, work shoes can go about 3-500 miles before they need to be replaced. Be good to your feet and replace them instead of trying to wear shoes until they are no longer usable.

For some of you, work shoes might mean high heels or flats. The same tips above apply, but the safety features might not be built in.

Everyone who wears work shoes that are not quite fitting properly or comfortably, you may benefit from using orthotic inserts. For those with specific shoe needs, our podiatrist can help you with custom orthotics. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your working feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment or orthotic device. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
April 18, 2018
Category: Children's Feet

Did you know that children’s bones do not fully develop until the ages of 18 to 25? That’s why it’s so important to make sure that when your child incurs an injury, a doctor looks it over. This is especially true when the injury involves the feet or ankles since there are 26 bones that can be affected on each side.

A condition that commonly affects growing children’s growing bones is Sever’s Disease. Also known as Calcaneal Apophysitis, the growth plate in the back of the heel bone has inflammation or swelling, causing pain to your child. Overuse, repeated impact, or blunt injury to the heel bone can cause pain in the back of the foot, making it painful to stand or walk.

Who is usually affected?

The causes of foot pain described above are typical for children and teens that play sports. Those who jump and run repeatedly during practice and games tend to be the ones who suffer from Sever’s Disease. Football, basketball, and long jump athletes tend to experience this type of heel pain. Additionally, children who are obese or have conditions like flat feet are also at higher risk of developing heel pain from the repeated strain on the Achilles tendon.

How can my child feel better?

As soon as your child complains of heel pain, check for symptoms like inflammation or swelling, redness, and tenderness. Pain when squeezing the sides of the heel bone will also indicate a likelihood of Sever’s Disease. For a proper diagnosis, it’s best to make an appointment to see our podiatrist. Additionally, the following treatments might help:

  • RICE method (at home): Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation will help relieve symptoms and reduce pain. Your child should stay off the affected foot (feet) to avoid further aggravation.
  • Orthotic inserts (over-the-counter): You can try to buy some heel inserts to see if supporting and cushioning the heel helps to relieve painful symptoms.
  • Physical Therapy (podiatrist-prescribed): When you see our podiatrist, he might recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles to better support the heel. Stretching can help relieve symptoms and promote healing.
  • Immobilization (podiatrist-prescribed): If the condition is severe, our podiatrist might recommend a cast or custom orthotic device to prevent your child from experiencing worse symptoms.

If your child complains of foot pain, it’s never a good sign. Make an appointment promptly by calling Crofton Podiatry in Maryland at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your children’s feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
April 11, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips

The weather may still be a bit wonky and unpredictable, but that doesn’t mean that your toes don’t deserve some pampering in preparation for spring and summer! For men and women alike, a pedicure can be a great tool for grooming and keeping the feet looking and feeling great.

However, there are times when pedicures can be harmful, rather than helpful. Depending on the health and hygiene practices of each nail salon (or yourself), a pedicure can result in ugly fungal toenails or a bacterial skin infection on your foot.

So what can you do to avoid a “bad” pedicure? Review the following safety tips when getting your toenails done:

  • DIY pedicure: One of the safest ways to give yourself a pedicure is to do it yourself. Having your own set of tools makes it easier to make sure that you do not become infected with someone else’s disease. Make sure to soak your toes in warm water before you begin, use tools gently so that you don’t hurt yourself, cut toenails straight across (not rounded), and moisturize the feet after your toenails are dry.
  • FIRST!: If you’ve seen this on a social media platform, it means that someone wanted to be the first to comment on a post. In this case, we encourage you to try and be the FIRST to get their nails done for that day. This would (likely) ensure that you are getting sanitized tools and no one else has shared the footbath with you.
  • Don’t be THAT person: Who, might you ask, is giving me this fear of infection? Well, it could be anyone! This also means that it can be YOU! If you have a fungal (i.e. Athlete’s foot or fungal toenails), a bacterial (which causes smelly feet), or viral (i.e. warts) infection, try to reschedule your appointment. If you cannot, let one of the pedicurists know so that they can take appropriate steps to protect other people’s feet.
  • Diabetic foot care: This includes getting pedicures done or having our podiatrist take care of this. Diabetic patients should be extra careful, especially if they have diabetic neuropathy. Not only is it possible that they will not feel a cut or other injury, it might also take longer to heal said cut/injury.

We have seen patients come in after a botched pedicure job or getting an infection from going to a nail salon. If you need treatment for a pedicure gone wrong, make an appointment to come see us. Call our office at (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and find you the proper treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding areas in Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
April 04, 2018
Category: Foot Injuries
Tags: swelling   falls   Orthotics   sprains   compression   sports injuries  

Quick! What do you do when you’ve injured your foot or ankle? Do you shake it off? Put some ice on it? Rush off to the emergency room?

Well, let’s start with the type of injury you’ve got and how severe it is. Many injuries, including falls, trips, sprains, bruises, and sports injuries tend to be mild or moderate. In most cases, if you can tolerate the pain or the pain comes and goes, you may not need emergency medical attention. Instead, you may be able to use the RICE method to keep symptoms at bay. Read on to learn more about the first step of treatment after a foot or ankle injury.

(Of course, if you’re not sure, or if symptoms do not get better in a few days, it’s best to seek medical attention.)

What is the RICE method? R = Rest, I = Ice, C = Compression, E = Elevation

After an injury, you may experience pain, redness, bruising, and/or swelling. To keep these symptoms at bay, use the RICE method. You’ll want to REST by stopping what you’re doing and waiting until you heal to get back into walking, running, or playing a sport. If you get back to using your injured foot or ankle too soon, you risk re-injuring it or making things worse. Better to miss out a little now, than to worsen the injury and require more treatment later.

ICING the injury can help reduce pain and swelling. Apply a cold compress to the injury for 15 minutes at a time to get the best results.

Additionally, if you use COMPRESSION socks or bandages around the impacted area, you can prevent excessive swelling as the body tries to protect the injured foot or ankle. It can promote healing by allowing for healthy circulation of blood and fluids.

Finally, whenever you can, ELEVATE the injured body part, also to promote circulation and reduce excessive swelling. If possible, raise the foot or ankle above heart level when you are lying down, and propped up a bit when sitting.

An injury doesn’t have to make you stop everything – but you should listen to your body and slow down. If you need better shoes or orthotics to support your feet, or if your mild injury seems to feel worse even when you apply RICE, make an appointment to come see us. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your injury and prescribe the proper treatment. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505