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Posts for: July, 2018

By Crofton Podiatry
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips
Tags: dry skin   fracture   stretch   sports   RICE method   cancer   flip-flops   jog  

Got your beach bag ready? Hope you packed a swimsuit, sunblock, sunglasses, flip flops, beach towel, and frozen water bottle for your day at the beach. Whether it be a water park, lakefront, or oceanfront day of relaxation, you should make sure to take precautions for keeping your feet safe too. Here are a few ways to do that:

Skin:

       Hydrate – Be sure to drink a lot of water throughout the day to prevent dehydration (which can also cause dry skin for your feet!)

       Sunblock – Be sure to wear sunblock lotion from the head to the toes to protect from UV (A and B) rays and reapply every couple of hours to reduce the risk of burning and developing skin cancer.

       Hygiene – Wash your feet with warm water and soap at the end of the day to remove sand and any other small particles or microorganisms that may have hitched a ride.

       Cuts and scrapes - When leaving sandy areas, rinse off the feet so that it doesn’t irritate the skin as you walk on smoother surfaces. It’s probably best to put on flip-flops or sandals to prevent problems from walking on rough or very hot surfaces. If you do incur cuts or scrapes, be sure to treat them promptly to prevent infection.

Shoes:

       Water shoes: A great way to keep your feet safe from injury at the beach is to wear water shoes. It will reduce the risk of cuts from sharp objects in the water as well as help with the transition to the sand and then to any boardwalks or other walkways.

Sports:

     Stretch and Warm-up – As soon as you get to the beach, start with some stretching and warm up. Walking on the beach can be unstable for your feet and ankles, and a wrong step can cause an injury. This is especially important if you are going to play sports like volleyball, throwing a Frisbee, or taking a jog.

     Sports injury – If you sustain a mild sports injury, use the RICE method to prevent worsening symptoms. If it’s a more severe injury, like a possible fracture, get the attention of medical staff or go to a local hospital.

Do you have a foot problem from a day at the beach? We can help you feel better. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. We also serve the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
July 18, 2018
Category: Foot Injuries

Most folks have endured some type of traumatic injury to the feet, whether by stubbing a toe, dropping a heavy object, or colliding with someone or something while playing sports. The pain can feel excruciating, especially to the top of the feet, where there isn’t much padding around the bones. Go on, feel the top of the feet – you’ll probably feel the long metatarsal bones across the top of your feet.

  • Pain: The immediate sensation you’ll likely feel is pain at the impact spot. The length and severity of the pain will depend on the force of the impact and the surface area injury. Walking or moving the feet can be very painful.
  • Bruise/Contusion: After a bit of time, you might notice some redness and subsequent bruising. Since the visual indication of bruising is a result of bleeding beneath the skin, you may or may not see the typical black and blue of bruising. It will depend on whether or not there is internal bleeding, and where it happens.
  • Bone bruise or hairline fractures: After an injury to bones, blood and fluids can enter and surround the area of the bone. This can happen when the bone is injured, but not enough to become a fracture. On the other hand, severe injury can lead to bone fractures (cracks) in the feet.
  • Inflammation and/or swelling: Depending on the location and severity of the injury, the soft tissues and bone areas can become inflamed or swollen. You may notice a bump from fluids gathering, or pain because of inflammation near nerves. When inflammation affects nerves, it can cause pain in larger areas of the foot (even causing pain to the bottom areas of the foot, due to an injury at the top).
  • Joint swelling: If the injury is at or near a joint, it can cause stiffness, swelling, or tenderness to the joint. It can even be the cause of post-traumatic arthritis.

Pain management after traumatic injury:

  1. RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Additionally, if the pain and inflammation are severe, you can take NSAIDs to reduce symptoms.
  2. If the injury does not get better or gets worse in a couple of days, it’s important to come see us and make sure that bones are not fractured and soft tissues are not torn. Our podiatrist can help you find the best treatment, which may include using a brace or other orthotic device.

We can help you feel better! Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our podiatry team is ready to help improve your foot health at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 


Heading to the beach this weekend? Don’t forget to put sunblock on your feet too!

There’s a reason why your skin is the body’s largest organ. It covers every inch of us, giving us information about the outside world, through the magic of touch. But that also means that in addition to soft and cuddly sensations, the skin is also exposed to harsh elements like the sun, rough surfaces, friction from shoes, pathogens, and anything you might be allergic to.

The skin on your feet are susceptible to the following:

  • Blisters, rash, or hives: Allergies can cause your skin to react to certain substances like sock materials or grass. You may feel itchy at the contact location, and pain if blisters occur in response to allergic contact dermatitis.
  • Athlete’s foot: Dry, itchy skin near the toes (as with Athlete’s foot) can be caused by the fungus, tinea. The same fungus can get into the toenails, causing brittle, discolored toenails, or fungal toenails.
  • Rash: Athlete’s foot can be a cause for a rash on the feet, but autoimmune skin diseases like eczema and psoriasis can also cause dry, itchy, scaly skin and rash.
  • Corns and calluses: These are caused by chronic friction, typically on the toes or near the balls of the feet. As a preventative measure, the skin thickens and can become painful and unsightly.
  • Smelly feet: Foot odor usually occurs when there is an overgrowth of bacteria or fungi. They can be contracted in communal areas such as locker rooms or community pools and can live in your socks and shoes. If you tend to sweat throughout the day, especially if you have hyperhidrosis, there’s a good chance that the bacteria and fungi thrive and make things stinky. They can also cause an infection!
  • Infection: Any cuts, scrapes, or large wounds are susceptible to attack by bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Any open skin allows for pathogens to enter and cause problems for your skin, including ulcers.
  • Warts: If you an open wound on your foot comes into contact with a surface in which someone else with warts has touched it, you are at risk of getting warts on your feet too. They can come and go on their own, but warts can become painful and continue to live in your body if not properly treated.
  • Malignant melanoma: While not commonly found on the foot, it is still possible to find an unusual looking mole on your feet, especially if your feet are often exposed to the sun.
  • Dry skin and heels: Just like the rest of your skin, your feet might become dry as well. The most commonly dry area of your feet is the heel. When you’ve got heel fissures, your heels can become dry and cracked, even causing you pain.

If you’ve noticed some changes in the skin of your feet, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our Crofton, MD office serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 


By Crofton Podiatry
July 03, 2018

Have your hands and feet been experiencing numbing, tingling, weakness, or burning? These are primary symptoms of what’s called peripheral neuropathy, a condition in which the nerves are damaged by injuries, infections, or toxins. It can cause problems that result in nerve signals that do not send information properly from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body, including the farthest (peripheral) body parts like the hands and feet.

Who can experience peripheral neuropathy?

There are certain conditions that make it more likely for you to suffer from peripheral neuropathy:

  • Diabetes mellitus – If blood sugar levels are left uncontrolled, especially for those who are diabetic, the excess sugar can damage nerves.
  • Alcoholism – Alcohol abuse can result in damaged nerve tissues. Too much alcohol can become toxic to your nerves.
  • Autoimmune diseases – Diseases that are characterized by chronic inflammation, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus can suffer from nerve damage due to inflammation.
  • Tumors – These overgrowths can directly or indirectly press on nerves, causing nerve signal blockage or damage.
  • Infection – Bacterial and viral infections like Lyme disease and shingles can cause nerve damage as the infectious agents can directly attack the nerves.
  • Toxins or Medications – Long-term exposure to some chemicals and even medications can cause a toxic effect on the nerves.
  • Traumatic Injury – Direct physical damage to the nerves from sports or other injuries, which disrupts the nerve signals.
  • Vitamin deficiency – Vitamin B and niacin are known to be essential for nerve health, so a deficiency could cause problems.

The symptoms of neuropathy in themselves can be uncomfortable or painful, but the secondary complications that can arise from peripheral neuropathy can be worse. Those who have lost feeling in feet are unknowingly susceptible to injuries like cuts, scrapes, or burns. When they go unnoticed and untreated, they can become ulcers and even gangrenous wounds!

Treatments are available to improve symptoms and prevent worsening symptoms. They range from taking pain relievers, anti-seizure medications, vitamin B-12 injections, physical therapy, and electrical current stimulation.

If you believe that your feet may be experiencing symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, for an assessment at Crofton Podiatry. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also provides services to the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505