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Posts for: November, 2018

By Crofton Podiatry
November 27, 2018
Category: Footwear
Tags: arthritis   Diabetic   ulcer   fungi  

Depending on your cultural background, you may or may not wear shoes in the house. There might be a good reason for either, but in case you haven’t thought of some of these, let’s discuss whether or not you should wear footwear indoors.

Why you might want to wear shoes in the house:

  • Diabetic feet – One of the possible complications of diabetes is nerve damage from high blood sugar levels. Your feet can experience tingling or complete loss of sensation. This means that if you drop a glass cup and it shatters, you might step on a sharp piece that wasn’t picked up, and not even realize it. This could lead to an open wound that doesn’t heal (ulcer). Wearing shoes in the house could protect your feet in those situations. If wearing outdoor shoes does not appeal to you, buy some shoes that are for indoor use only.
  • Arthritic feet – There are many joints in the feet that can be affected by arthritis and gout. Wearing orthotic, supportive shoes can help reduce the repetitive impact that walking barefoot on hardwood floors can have. Your feet can be cushioned and comfortable as you go about your day at home.
  • Outdoor pets – If you share a home with a furry friend that goes in and out of the house, you might also be fine with wearing your shoes in and out of the house as well. Otherwise, you’ll probably want to clean their paws every time you take them in and out of the house as they track dirt and germs in.

Why you might NOT want to wear shoes in the house:

  • Dirt – Sure, a little dirt never hurt anyone, but now you’ve got more cleaning to do on a regular basis as your shoes track in dirt and, on rainy days, mud.
  • Germs – Some of that dirt and grime that lives on the bottom of your shoes include many harmful microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and even viruses. Think about that public bathroom you just went to where people might have missed the toilet bowl. Now you’ve stepped in that and brought it home with you! Furthermore, if you wear shoes and then take them off to be barefoot, you risk your feet getting infections from the germs carried in.
  • Children – Speaking of dirt and germs, while they can help build your children’s immune systems, it may not be the best idea to have them crawling on the floor on unclean floors. You know that they put their hands and mouths on everything, wherever they go. So why not keep your home free of the dirt and germs that your shoes carry in?

If you do wear shoes into the house, you might want to make sure to have slippers for the times when you are not in closed-toed shoes. This can help reduce infections and the spreading of germs.

Of course, if you have any problems with diabetes, arthritis, or skin infections on your feet, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.


By Crofton Podiatry
November 19, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: high heels   yoga   pedicure   nutritious food  

When you think about what you’re thankful for, you might list things like health, family, friends, a job, your dog, etc., etc. But have you thought about focusing your gratitude on your feet?

Sure, that sounds silly or weird, but let’s STEP BACK, and think about it.

Why would you thank your feet?

  • They take you where you want to go.
  • They stabilize you when you stand, ride a skateboard, or do yoga.
  • They help you reach those things that are high up.
  • They work hard to keep you active and healthy.
  • They allow you to operate certain machines like cars or sewing machines.
  • They give you tools of defense (if you learn how to kick properly!).

You use your feet every single day without a single thought. They just work and go and do. So in appreciation of your hard-working feet, why not try some of these ways to THANK your feet during this season of giving thanks:

  • T-Treat your feet to a safe and clean pedicure!
  • H-Help yourself to nutritious foods with calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidants!
  • A-Apply moisturizer when your feet get dry, especially as it gets colder.
  • N-Note any foot pain or changes and make an appointment to get treatment.
  • K-Kick back and relax – a partner massage or a foot massager machine.
  • S-Soak your feet in a warm bath - with Epsom salt and essential oils.

Additionally, you might want to replace some of your older shoes with newer, more comfortable shoes with supportive features. If you must wear high heels or tight shoes, bring comfortable shoes to change into as soon as you can. While you’re at it, get yourself some standing mats for in front of the sinks, stoves, and desks of your home. Wherever you stand for long periods of time, that’s where your feet will be happy to have some cushioning.

As you do your holiday shopping, travel, and spend time with loved ones, don’t forget to give your feet some TLC. The best thing you can do is to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry if you notice anything wrong with your feet. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Dr. Toll and his foot care team are dedicated to your foot health. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
November 13, 2018
Tags: Diabetes   Ulcers   gangrene   smoking   drinking   nerve damage  

Who can be affected by foot ulcers? Foot ulcers are usually a result of poor circulation, nerve damage, and/or prolonged pressure on the foot. Those who have conditions such as peripheral arterial disease, kidney failure or diabetes are prone to developing foot ulcers due to complications of these diseases. Excessive smoking, drinking or sitting (yes, sitting) can also increase the risk of developing foot ulcers.

What is a foot ulcer? An ulcer is a sore or wound that is slow to heal. The skin can begin to break down and the wound can get deeper, even to the point of exposing bone!

When does a diabetic person get foot ulcers? Once a diabetic person experiences loss of sensation due to nerve damage and poor circulation, ulcers can begin to cause problems. 

Where do foot ulcers appear? Most commonly, ulcers tend to form under the balls of feet, along the arch, on the toes, and on the heels. These are areas that experience the most pressure throughout the day.

Why is it a big problem to have foot ulcers? When left untreated, foot ulcers can become severely infected, leading to gangrene and even amputation.

…and finally, How does having diabetes lead to foot ulcers?

When you have diabetes, your body has a hard time controlling sugar levels.

The direct effect is that having high blood sugar levels damages your nerves. This leads to neuropathy, which causes you to lose feeling in your extremities. When you cannot detect discomfort or pain in your feet, the rest of your body does not have the information it needs to heal sores or wounds.

A diabetic’s body also doesn’t send normal signals to regulate the circulation of fluids and blood, so the ulcer does not receive the nutritive healing factors it needs. If the ulcer becomes infected, it’s that much more difficult to heal!

As you walk and put pressure on your feet, it can cause that part of the skin on your foot to begin to break down and become an ulcer. If you have peripheral neuropathy, you may not even notice it until a couple weeks later, when it’s likely infected.

That’s why it’s important to do foot checks often and take good care of your feet when you have diabetes. If you notice the beginnings of a possible ulcer, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry before you experience complications. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 or contact us online. Our podiatry team is ready to assist you at our office in Crofton, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.


By Crofton Podiatry
November 06, 2018
Category: foot exercises
Tags: walking   toe exercise  

The shortest days of the year are approaching, and you can definitely feel it. If you’re one of the many folks who have long commutes, there’s a good chance that you leave for work in the dark and you get back home in the dark.

This might lead to a lower likelihood of going outside to get a few more steps into your day. The dark and cold of the night might make you want to stay indoors. Instead of taking the long route home, you might opt for the quickest and most direct path.

So how can you find ways to include more physical activity in your day? How about you do it while at work? Try some of the following exercises, depending on what your workspace allows:

  • Foot circles: Raise one or both feet and make circles with your feet, rotating at your ankles. If you raise both feet high enough, you might even get an abdominal workout!
  • Point and Flex: Raise one or both feet and spend 5 seconds each, pointing and flexing. Add a toe exercise by spreading the toes when you flex the feet.
  • Squats: If you have a private or semi-private cubicle (or maybe even if you don’t!), set a goal of how many squats you want to do in a day. Maybe just 50 or 100. Then take quick breaks to do 10 at a time. It’s a quick and easy way to prevent from sitting too long. Be sure to plant your heels down firmly to do them properly.
  • Air Chair: As you write an email or chat, challenge yourself to do an air chair for the duration of your message.
  • Heel raises: If you have a sit/stand desk, do some heel raises as you work or during quick breaks. You can also do some tip-toe walking when you go to the water station to hydrate.
  • Walking or climbing breaks: If your lunch is an hour, try spending some of that time walking outside or climbing stairs. Additionally, challenge yourself to take stairs if you have meetings with coworkers on a different floor.

You can do these exercises as often or as little as you want. If you tend to forget the time as you work, set an alarm every 30 min to an hour to make some part of your body move. Get up to get water, go to the bathroom, or take some deep breaths while stretching.

If you notice any pain or discomfort while doing these exercises, make an appointment at Crofton Podiatry with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. We use the latest treatment options to take care of all of your foot and ankle care needs. Our podiatry team at our serves the Crofton, MD area as well as the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie.





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505