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Posts for: March, 2019

By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: corns   Diabetes   footwear   callus   skin   plantar wart  

What may appear to be minor problems on your feet can easily turn into more serious situations. This is why it you suspect you are developing a callus or corn you will want to check with a podiatrist.

What is a callus? A callus is a thickening of the skin due to friction or undue stress. Calluses usually occur in between toes, on the ball or heel or on the sides of your feet and vary in shape. Corns are another type of skin thickening, but can be much more painful. A corn has a much harder center and occur on weight bearing and non-weight bearing parts of the foot. Both develop to protect skin below the affected area.

Causes include:

  • Poor fitting shoes. Footwear that does not cushion your feet.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes inhibits good circulation.
  • Lack of socks. Not wearing socks can cause friction between the foot and shoes. Poor fitting socks can do the same.

Symptoms for Calluses and Corns include:

  • A thick area of skin.
  • A hardened and raised bump on your foot.
  • Tenderness under your skin.
  • The development of flaky skin.

Corns and calluses are sometimes misidentified as a plantar wart. Plantar warts have small black dots in them and are painful if squeezed from the side. Corns and calluses are painful when pressure is applied on top.

If you choose to treat the calluses yourself, try soaking them in warm water then gently rubbing them with a wetted pumice stone in a circular motion, but do not take off too much skin. Applying lotion afterward and use specific padding to keep them away from the sides of your shoes. Calluses or corns could take up to 4 weeks to go away. The best way to deal with them, however, is by seeing your podiatrist. This is especially important if they are caused by diabetes, an abnormal foot structure, walking motion or hip rotation.

If you believe you may have a corn or callus or have any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 


By Crofton Podiatry
March 12, 2019
Category: Bunion
Tags: podiatrist   corns   calluses   surgery   Bunion   arthritis  

Choosing the right fitting footwear is very important, as making the wrong choice could cause very painful problems for your feet. One of the effects of not doing so is the development of something called a bunion or a painful bony lump on the inside of the foot at the big toe joint. The lump, or bunion, also known as hallux valgus, puts pressure on the big toe causing it to turn inward.  While not everyone gets a bunion, those who do need to see a podiatrist to have it treated.

Risk factors for bunions include:

  • Inherited foot type. You may have a structural defect that’s been passed down from others.
  • High heel shoes. Shoes which put excessive strain on the toes pushing them together.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. A condition of sensitive swelling in the toe joints.
  • Poor fitting shoes. Both men and women need to make sure shoes provide plenty of width, especially at the toes.

Usually, someone suffering from a bunion will feel pain enough to know something is wrong, but other symptoms may also occur including difficulty finding correct fitting footwear, a visible lump near your big toe, corns or calluses where toes overlap and a lessened ability to move your toes. All these are signs that you may be developing a bunion.

Treatment of bunions will depend on the severity of the bunion. Non-surgical treatments include:

  • Wearing correct fitting and more comfortable shoes.
  • Wearing bunion pads which helps place the toes in a more anatomically correct position.
  • Placing ice on the foot which will help reduce swelling.
  • Pain medicine. The use of over the counter pain meds to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Injecting Cortisone in the foot to alleviate swelling.

In more severe and painful cases surgery may be needed including:

  • The removal of swollen and painful joint tissue.
  • Removing or cutting parts of the big toe thereby straightening it.
  • Adjusting the bones in your feet to make them straighter with regard to the toes. 
  • Repairing the tendons and ligaments around the toe.

Of course, only the most severe cases require surgery. The best person to determine how to treat your bunion is your podiatrist. Only they will know what is best for your foot.

If you believe you may have a bunion or have any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 


By Crofton Podiatry
March 05, 2019
Category: Plantar Fasciitis

With today’s push for more and more healthy lifestyles, many people are turning to physical activity to do so. Some of this includes running or jogging which is a great way to lose weight or just keep in shape. With this, though, can come foot pain caused by a condition known as Plantar Fasciitis.

Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes.  Most likely you will immediately feel a stabbing pain in your foot as soon as you wake. The pain may improve during the day, but most likely will return after standing for long periods of time or rising suddenly from a seated position.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis include:

  • Age - Common between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Exercise - Activities that place a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, ballet and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat-feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking affecting weight distribution.
  • Obesity - Excessive weight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, nurses and others who spend a lot of time hours walking or standing on hard surfaces.

Ignoring Plantar Fasciitis symptoms can cause further foot, knee, hip or back problems so seeing a podiatrist is crucial. Treatments include:

  • Examination - Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - To check damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Medicine- Doctor prescribed pain meds.
  • Stretching - Simple foot stretches to help alleviate the pain.
  • Therapy - including Physical therapy, Night Splints and the use of orthotics.
  • Surgery - at times this may be the last resort if the pain is not subsiding.

If you believe you run the risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis then you will want to start losing weight, always wear good running shoes, choose footwear that is supportive, has good arch support and absorbs shock well. Such common-sense approaches may just keep your feet pain free and you better able to improve your overall health.

If you have any issues or notice pain while trying any exercise, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 





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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505