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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

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In our last post, we spoke about when you should replace the shoes that you wear so that they will not cause harm to your feet. Now, we’d like to talk about a particular type of shoes (high heels) and how they can affect your foot health.

Whether it’s for work, going out to dinner, dancing, or special events, women have specific foot issues that can be aggravated by or attributed to wearing high heels on an almost-daily basis. The higher the heel of the shoes, the more pressure is placed on the forefoot. The midfoot, balls of the feet, and toes have to endure more strain, leading to more problems such as metatarsalgia, hammertoes, Morton’s neuroma, and/or bunions. Additionally, the tendons and ligaments along the foot and ankles must work harder to keep you stabilized throughout the day.

What’s worse, the high heels make your feet and ankles act like they are walking downhill all day. This means more strain (and therefore, pain) on the calves, knees, and back, throwing your alignment out of whack. So if you have been having back, neck, or shoulder pain, it may be caused by your shoes!

So then, what are my options?

  • If you feel that you have to wear high heels, try to find ways to get out of them periodically. You can take them off while you’re sitting at your desk, while driving, and while commuting. It will help reduce the risk of repetitive stress on the feet, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Also, as often as you can, stretch your feet and toes to release from their cramped environment. Doing a deep calf stretch, including pulling the toes back will be beneficial for your entire foot.
  • When you purchase high-heeled shoes, do your best to try them on and walk around in them for a bit to see if they feel comfortable. We would advise against assuming that shoes will break in. Pointy-toe shoes can squeeze your toes into uncomfortable positions, adding force to the big toe joint and directly onto the toes. Look for a wider toe box and a shoe that follows the natural curves of your feet. A thicker/chunkier heel will help with stabilization and balance, as will a good fit. Don’t buy shoes that are a little bit big or small – it has to fit well to reduce the risk of foot pain.
  • If your high heels seem comfortable but could use a bit of support, orthotic inserts, such as for the arches or the balls of your feet, you may experience less strain on the feet.

Do you have foot pain from wearing high heels on a daily basis? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you create custom orthotics. Contact our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505