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Posts for tag: Athlete's Foot

By Crofton Podiatry
February 06, 2019
Category: skin conditions

Every person’s skin is different. The way they react to the moisture, or lack thereof, can be very different. Some people develop rashes, while others become very itchy and scaly. That’s why there are so many different kinds of moisturizing solutions out there!

The skin on your feet will most likely react the way it does everywhere else on your body. If the air is dry, the parts of your body that are most exposed to the elements are likely to respond by drying out.

Here are some causes for dry feet and what you can do about them:

  • Dry air – Especially in the winter, the air can become dry. With humidity levels dropping, your skin needs more moisture. Apply a moisturizer such as lotions or creams more often than you do during the summer. Additionally, try your best not to expose your skin to dry windy air for too long, as that will make the dryness worse.
  • Overexertion and/or dehydration – Much physical activity can cause your body to overheat resulting in lots of sweating to help you cool down. If you are not hydrated enough, excessive sweating can lead to dry skin, due to dehydration. Make sure that you drink adequate amounts of water each day – about 8 – 8oz glasses per day.
  • Skin conditions – If you have skin issues like eczema or psoriasis, you are more likely to have rashes and/or dry, flaky skin. It can even lead to painfully cracked heel fissures. Be sure to stay on top of moisturizing, and if necessary, topical medications. Drink plenty of water each day.
  • Skin infection – If dry skin is because of an infection like Athlete’s foot, be sure to treat the source of the problem right away. Use over-the-counter antifungal creams at the first sign of symptoms. If they are not effective, come in so that we can prescribe you a stronger treatment.
  • Health conditions – Some health conditions can have a side effect of dry skin. Diabetes is one of the conditions that can lead to dry skin. The lack of circulation can cause problems for bringing necessary fluids and nutrients to nourish your skin. Ask your doctor how you can help your dry skin when you’ve got diabetes.

If you’ve got persistent dry skin and only using moisturizers doesn’t seem to be working, try some of these home remedies to help your dry skin.

  • Set up a nice warm footbath. Soak for at least 10 minutes and then gently scrub areas of dry skin with a pumice stone. Make sure you moisturize your feet after drying them off.
  • Add Epsom salt, apple cider vinegar, or honey to the foot soak. These can help to increase moisture absorption, as well as help keep infections at bay.  
  • Use paraffin wax to seal in moisture while you sleep.

Got persistent dry feet that won’t heal up no matter what you try? Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your dry feet. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 23, 2019
Category: Fungal toenails

Fungal problems are more common than you think. They can affect many parts of the body, from the tops of your heads to the bottoms of your feet. For the feet, in particular, the most common issues affect the skin and the toenails. In fact, one infection (toenail fungus) can start from another (Athlete’s foot).

Where would you get this fungal infection on your feet?

Some places where you might have picked up the infection include the gym locker room, sharing a towel with someone who has a fungal infection or from the tools at the last pedicure you received. 

Fungus thrives in moist and warm environments. So moisture + a break in the skin of a warm foot = fungal infection. It passes from person to person, foot to foot, and toenail to toenail pretty easily. Once your toenails are infected, they are likely to become discolored, thick, brittle, and develop a smell.

So what can you do to prevent a stubborn fungal toenail infection?

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash every day with soap and warm water to reduce the risk of developing an infection.
  • Do not walk around barefoot in a gym locker room. Wear flip-flops or sandals, especially if you’re using a communal shower.
  • If you are prone to sweating a lot due to hyperhidrosis, bring a pair of socks to change into when your socks have soaked through.
  • You can also use antifungal or foot powder in your socks or shoes to reduce moisture in the shoes. 
  • Do not share nail grooming tools with someone who is infected (or at least be very diligent about disinfecting).
  • Cut your toenails properly. Ingrown toenails can cause breaks in the skin that make you more prone to a fungal infection.
  • Go to a reputable salon for a pedicure. Make sure that you can see how they sterilize their tools. Otherwise, schedule your pedicure for their first appointment of the day to ensure that they are starting the day with freshly cleaned tools on you.
  • If you have Athlete’s foot or other fungal infection on your hands, be sure to clean your hands often before touching your toes. Treat your Athlete’s foot condition promptly to prevent spreading.
  • You may have to stop using nail polish altogether as your toenails will have a harder time recovering from a fungal infection when it cannot breathe (due to polished nails).

These prevention measures should lower the risk of having to deal with fungal toenails. However, if you do somehow get infected, our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, can help you treat the condition with topical or oral medication or painless laser therapy! Request an appointment by calling Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
December 18, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips

During the holidays, you have a lot to think about – cold weather, travel arrangements for the family, gifts, and, of course, gearing up to see all of your overbearing extended family members!

But we wanted to take a moment and remind you about how you can think about your feet during this time. For most, you’ll have some amount of travel during the holidays, so here are some tips to keep your feet happy as you go home for the holidays.

Pack your shoes – Unless your travel is just up the block to your parents’ house, you might want to bring more than just your one pair of shoes. If you’ll have some walking to do in the snow, wear your best, most waterproof boots. Then, make sure you bring some flip-flops in case your hosts are not the cleanest (or wears shoes in the house while you don’t). Finally, bring comfortable walking shoes if you’ll be going out for holiday events in town.

Schedule in rest and relaxation – No matter what your holiday travel plans, your feet will be doing a lot to take you from place to place. Doing some last minute shopping? Your feet will be the ones helping you run around. Climbing up 50 steps to your relative’s 4th floor walkup? It’s only possible thanks to your feet. Gripping the snow-covered ground to the mountain cabin your family rented? That’s hard work provided by your strong and healthy feet.

So why not give them some well-deserved rest with your feet up? Take turns with family members to give and receive foot massages. Yay for new holiday traditions!

Take cautions – There are a few issues that can put your feet at risk for foot problems:

  • Germs: Yep, when you’re on holiday, your feet are more at risk for encountering germs from new places and other people. It’s easy to catch a foot fungus infection (i.e. Athlete’s foot) when sharing slippers or towels with relatives who already have it.
  • Fireplace: While it is nice and cozy to share the fire with family, be careful not to get burned, especially if you have lost sensation due to diabetic neuropathy.
  • Black ice: As you travel during the cold winter months, be careful of slipping on nearly invisible black ice. Walk in well-lit places and use treaded shoes when walking outside at night after rain or snow, or you could end up with an ankle sprain!
  • Frostbite: During cold weather days and nights, be sure to wear socks with shoes to prevent unnecessary frost to your feet. Change out of wet socks and shoes as soon as possible!

Have concerns about your feet as you travel? Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our podiatry team is ready to assist you with your foot and ankle issues at our office in Crofton, MD, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 02, 2018
Category: skin conditions

Are your feet experiencing symptoms like dry, cracked, and/or scaly skin? It might make you think that your skin might be extremely dry and that you need to moisturize after you shower tonight. However, there might be something else going on! Read on to see if it might be symptoms of athlete’s foot.

You don’t have to be an athlete to get athlete’s foot. The foot fungus, which is in the tinea family, causes what is commonly referred to as athlete’s foot. This same fungus also causes fungal toenails, ringworm, and jock itch.

What symptoms should I look for?

  • Red rash between the toes
  • Stinging/burning skin
  • Itchy blisters on the feet
  • Itchy dry skin near the toes, up the sides of the feet, and along the bottom of the feet.
  • Cracking or scaly skin that begins to peel
  • Fungal toenails, which are also infected by the fungus (discolored, brittle toenails)

Where did I get Athlete’s Foot?

  • Walking around in locker rooms while barefoot
  • Using communal showers while barefoot
  • Community saunas or pools
  • Sharing towels, socks, or shoes with someone who has a fungal infection

If you have sweaty feet, causing your socks and shoes to be chronically damp or wet, you are more likely to create an environment in which fungi can thrive. Any small cut, scrape, or opening can allow the fungus to enter into the skin and cause an infection.

How do I treat it?

  • Self-treatment: You can use over-the-counter antifungal creams, ointments, lotions, powders, or sprays
  • Prescribed treatment: Our podiatrist can prescribe a stronger topical treatment or oral medication to treat fungus that has spread.

How do I prevent it?

The best ways to reduce your risk and reduce the impact of an infection include:

  • Keeping your feet dry (change your socks midday, rotate the shoes you wear, use shoes with ventilation)
  • Use flip-flops or sandals in public places, rather than going barefoot
  • Wash your feet with soap and warm water daily, especially after walking barefoot
  • Don’t share items like towels and shoes with those who might be infected

If over-the-counter treatments and medications do not work, come in for an evaluation and treatment. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Our foot and ankle team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
August 08, 2018
Category: Foot health
Tags: swelling   Athlete's Foot   Gout   Orthotics   Diabetes   surgery   pain   arthritis   injury   psoriasis   fungal   ingrown   cracked heels  

There are some obvious times to visit a foot doctor:

  1. Foot injury – A podiatrist can help you find the best way to take care of foot injuries, with anything from orthotics to surgery.
  2. Ankle injury – Yep! Podiatrists also take care of ankle issues.
  3. Foot and ankle pain – If you suddenly notice pain or have ongoing pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time or at-home treatment, our podiatry team will help you figure out what’s going on.podiatrist

Beyond the more obvious reasons for visiting a podiatrist, some other very important times to call our office for foot health care are:

  1. Annual foot examinations – Some foot and ankle issues can arise with subtle symptoms. Catching a problem early can allow for a simpler intervention. Additionally, since a foot doctor is a fully-licensed medical professional, they can help diagnose other problems that may present symptoms affecting the feet. In fact, some patients learn about their diabetes after coming for a foot problem checkup.
  2. Conditions or diseases like arthritis, gout, or diabetes – Speaking of diabetes, folks with certain diseases can develop side effects that affect the feet. A podiatrist can help you manage symptoms like pain or numbness.
  3. Swelling or numbness – If you have swelling or numbness that is unexplained or persists for a long time, come in to check for underlying conditions.
  4. New deformities or changes in skin – Sometimes changes in the feet go unnoticed compared to changes in other parts of the body. That’s why it’s important to check the feet often for any changes that might need treatment. Additionally, severely dry, cracked heels, as well as other conditions like Athlete’s foot or psoriasis may require podiatrist help for treatment.
  5. Ingrown or fungal toenails – Most times, moderate to severe cases of ingrown or fungal toenails requires the attention of a podiatrist. Trying to treat these toenail conditions at home may be fruitless or even more harmful (e.g. trying to pry out ingrown toenails can lead to infection).

As you can see, there are many reasons why you might want to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Please contact us and visit our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505