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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

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Its official – the 2014 football season is well underway and in full swing! In the mire of foam fingers, painted faces, and nacho platters that are now sure to flood your weekend festivities, it is truly a joyous time for celebration (if your team wins that is!). Despite all the celebration and weekend festivities associated with game day rituals, Players such as Chargers’ Manti Te’o or (Toe-O as we’re referring to him) are already losing game time due to injuries to their feet. Whether you’re playing professionally, academically, or just in the backyard the long-term mental capacity damage from repetitive concussions is deeply concerning.

However, in the light of the recent scandals regarding concussions to the head, people often forget the extremely debilitating injuries that occur on the other side of the body – the feet! Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common in high-impact sports such as football, and can lead to a number of long-term problems. In addition to the number of sprains, fractures, and tendon injuries that may occur, football players are also prone to a number of other injuries such as turf toe, Sesamoiditis, Plantar fasciitis, and even Achilles tendonitis or rupture. Oftentimes, many of these injuries take much longer to heal than the participant will accept, and this can lead to additional injuries and a worse overall prognosis.

Team sports are excellent for developing personal skills, personal fitness and for just overall fun!  However, parents of students playing football in the Annapolis and Crofton areas should take extra caution to be sure their teens are training and playing properly to avoid injury.  Below are my pro-tips for reducing injury during any physical activity.  As always, if an injury is suspected and is beyond self-care it is important that you seek proper medical care immediately to prevent long-term damage!

The Crofton Podiatry tips for reducing football injury to the lower extremity:

·         Be sure to properly warm up prior to any sports activity

·         Condition your muscles for the sport in the off season

·         Choose athletic shoes specifically for your foot type

·         Replace athletic shoes when the tread wears out or the heels wear down

·         Prevent recurrent injury by listening to your body!

·         Listen to your body

By Brad Toll.

By Brad Toll
December 06, 2014
Category: Shin Splints

While football is busy taking most of the attention in the States, its international competitor futbol is catching some recent headlines. Recently, Manchester United’s Phil Jones has picked up yet another injury, with this time being shin splints! Jones had only been back on the field less than a week after being forced to miss four games due to a hamstring injury. While Jones was thought to have recovered from the previous injury, and was training for a past Sunday’s Premier League game against longtime rival Chelsea. However, on the Saturday before the game, Jones started to feel soreness in the front of his legs and was unable to play in both the Sunday game against Chelsea and the Monday Old Tafford clash vs. the Blues. Unfortunately for now, the team’s managers are still unsure how long it will take Jones to recover.

As many of my patients in the Crofton and Gambrills area of Maryland know, you don’t have to be a professional athlete to get shin splints. In fact, many of my patients who present with this horrible pain are just trying to get started in a running routine. Unfortunately, the severe pain we feel in our shins is actually caused by small tears in the area where our lower leg muscles attach to our shin bone (or tibia).  These tears occur because of over-use and overstretching of these muscles, especially following periods or inactivity, or during extended use.

Some of the best ways we can prevent or reduce the occurrence of shin splints is making sure we have the right shoes for our body type, and making sure to stretch our calves and legs regularly even when we aren’t involved in exercise. Additionally, always being sure to use warm up and cool down exercises, and to take breaks when you start feeling shin splints coming on. Taking these necessary precautions may reduce the severity and recurrence of these muscle pains. Ultimately, anytime you have longstanding pain that isn’t easily resolved, it is vital that you see a local specialist. They will be able to study your body type to truly get to the bottom of what is causing your pain, and can focus on finding the true source of your pain, rather than just treating the symptoms itself. And if you’re in our neck of the woods don’t hesitate to call us Crofton Podiatry!

By Brad Toll.


While many NFL fans between Bowie and Annapolis may have spent their Monday licking their wounds following the devastating Bronco’s loss to the Seahawk’s overwhelming force at the XLVIII Super Bowl, not everybody from the Seahawk’s camp is in full celebration. Seattle Seahawk’s All-Pro cornerback Richard Sherman, who was a major force behind the defense that stopped the 49’ers in the NFC Championship, and who was also implicit in the complete dismantling of Peyton Manning’s offensive maneuvers with the Denver Broncos Sunday night, suffered two clear ankle sprains during Sunday’s game; the second of which took him out of the fourth quarter with 11:28 left on the clock.

While Sherman was eventually able to celebrate the victory with his teammates (on the sidelines and in a walking boot with crutches), his injury was a clear reminder of the susceptibility of the human foot to damage, even in trained professionals.  Ankle sprains are unfortunately all too common, infamously causing significant pain, discomfort, and limited mobility during the months they may take to properly heal.

In Maryland, winter weather presents an even greater danger for sprains as ice and slick surfaces cause many unsuspecting victims to join Sherman’s crutch-wearing ‘Legion of Boom’ every snow season.  If an overzealous touchdown celebration or a treacherous ice patch has put one of your ankles in pain, don’t wait, we can help.  Schedule an appointment with Crofton Podiatry today.  Our office is conveniently located in Crofton between Bowie and Annapolis, so we can get your recovery started and put you back on your feet and back in the game as soon as possible.

by Brad Toll

By Brad Toll
January 25, 2014
Category: Foot Pain

Let’s talk about the future of Jimmy Graham for a moment.  In case you’ve missed it, Jimmy (a fabled tight end with the New Orleans Saints) was diagnosed in week 7 with an injury to his foot.  As the end of 2013 drew near, the controversy grew over the fate of Graham’s future career, with speculations ranging to every extreme. So just what exactly did Jimmy do, and just what does his future look like? 

Our feet are just as complex as our hands; featuring a similar formula of bones, ligaments and tendons.  In addition, they bear all of the pounding forces our bodies create as we walk.  Overtime, repeated impacts on our feet wear and tear our plantar fascia (the ligamentous band running along the bottom of our feet).  This prolonged stress creates micro-trauma in this band, bringing pain, inflammation and swelling to our feet until they are allowed to heal.

In Graham’s case, he was diagnosed with a partially torn plantar fascia.  And while he chose to play through the rest of the season, you can be sure it wasn’t without discomfort, and constant worry.  Thick tissues like fascia have a reduced blood supply, and as a result, take much longer to heal than other parts of the body.  Continuing to play on an already compromised fascia, Graham continued to damage an already weakened part of his body.  Running the risk of completing the tear in his inflamed fascia could result in an extremely painful and intense rupture of his fascial band.  Such an injury could set him back many months of training, and may cost him top dollars in his upcoming contract renewals.

In the end, it doesn’t take an NFL tight end to tear your plantar fascia.  It is easier than you think, and anyone from the weekend golfer to the Olympic athlete can experience complications.  If you are feeling pain in the bottom of your feet at the end of the day, or just as you are getting your morning started, come by and see Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry in Crofton, MD to get the best tips and tricks for reducing your foot pain and preventing damage to your plantar fascia. Dr. Toll is anexperienced foot and ankle surgeon, and has decades of expertise in preventing and treating foot injuries.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505