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Posts for tag: Hammertoes

By Crofton Podiatry
September 05, 2018
Category: toe deformities
Tags: corns   bunions   Diabetes   Hammertoes   claw toe   curly toes  

If your toes look different from other people’s toes, there’s a good chance that you have a toe deformity. It can make you uncomfortable to take off your shoes or wear open-toed sandals. Read on to see what kind of toe deformity you might have – and to see if they can be helped.

Bunions and Tailor’s bunions – With this type of deformity, the big toe joint (or the small toe joint) is enlarged. Pressure on the big or small toe joints causes a bony spur to develop. You’ll notice a bump on the side of the joint, which can be painful if it is not cushioned in your shoes. Additionally, bunions can cause the big toes to point toward the other toes, rather than straight.

  • Treatment options include padding in the shoes, toe exercises, and in severe cases, surgery to set the bone straight and remove the bony spur.

Hammertoes – When shoes do not fit properly and the toes are cramped, toes can become bent. The muscles in the toes become tight and can eventually become rigid. Toes form a bent shape and can appear clenched, which is where the name of the deformity comes from. The unnatural shape can make it more likely for you to have pain from corns at the bent joint.

  • Help your toes by buying shoes with roomy toe boxes, using corn pads, and doing toe exercises to strengthen them and make them flexible.

Claw Toe – Certain diseases that damage nerves can cause foot muscles to weaken. This condition causes the toes to curl downward in a claw-like shape. When they are bent out of shape, the joints can become irritated and cause corns to develop.

  • Those with diabetes and alcoholic neuropathy should pay attention to the toes. Early detection is key to easier treatment. Toe exercises and splints can help to keep the toes in the proper shape.

Curly toes, underlapping, and overlapping toes – These deformities are usually present from birth and can be treated early as the foot develops.

  • Stretching, taping, and maybe even surgery can help to release the toes from the curled up shape.

Not all toe deformities are necessarily painful. However, they can cause long-term stress and side effects like corns. Exercising the toes can be very beneficial and can help reduce symptoms. If you need help improving your toe health and confidence, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our foot care team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office. We also serve the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD. 

By Crofton Podiatry
August 01, 2018
Category: Bunion

Got bunions? They’re not as fun as Funyuns, but they may make you tear up like onions. The bony growths that stick out from the big toe joint can cause you pain and discomfort. For some, it’s manageable, but for others, putting shoes on can be painful and some footwear can be impossible to fit into.

Where did your bunions come from?

A bunion is a deformity at the base of the big toe. The bone behind the big toe joint is unstable and it can shift up and away, causing the big toe to turn in towards the other smaller toes. The constant pressure on that joint area from wearing shoes can cause a bony growth to develop. When left unchecked, the bony growth can become so large that the foot shape changes. The top of the big toe moves from pointing forward to pointing at the other toes. Fitting into sandals or other structured shoes with smaller toe boxes will be difficult.

What other things could happen when you have bunions?

When left untreated, bunions can cause further complications for your feet. Additional foot problems can arise, leading to other areas of pain and/or discomfort for your feet. The following complications can arise if bunions become severe:

  • Toe deformities: hammertoes, mallet toes, and overlapping toes can all occur because of the misalignment of the big toe. The big toe can push the smaller toes into different positions, especially while wearing shoes – and the long-term effect is that the toes become stiff in those positions.
  • Bursitis: Chronic inflammation of fluid-filled sacs (bursa) that provide cushioning around joints. As the big toe joint is irritated by footwear rubbing against the area sticking out, the bursae become inflamed and cause you pain.
  • Ball of foot pain: Also called metatarsalgia, it occurs when there is chronic inflammation of the balls of the feet. The bunion issue can cause you to want to transfer pressure onto your other toes and the rest of the midfoot, away from the bunion. The balls of the feet experience strain from overuse.

So if you have bunions, take steps to reduce worsening symptoms, for it can lead to further complications. Try some at-home treatments for your bunions and wear shoes that won’t aggravate your bunion pain. If you have a severe bunion and need help treating it, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle needs. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
June 20, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips
Tags: Hammertoes   stiffness   yoga   pedicure   ingrown   ankles  

Now that it’s time for the toes to come out and play (in open-toed shoes), you may be thinking more about how they look. Do they need some toenail trimming? Thinking about how to best groom those toe hairs? Maybe you’re considering a pedicure?

You may also be wondering if your toes always looked like that. Are some of them looking a bit crooked or bent up more than you remember? Is a toenail becoming ingrown? After the cold season, your toes may need some extra love.

To start, if you notice any toe or feet problems, inspect them to see if there is any redness, pain, or inflammation. If you need some treatment, make an appointment with us at Crofton Podiatry so that you can find safe and effective remedies.

At home, we encourage you to try doing toe exercises, especially if you notice that your toes are becoming deformed. For example, if you begin to develop hammertoes, where your toes form an upside-down “V” shape, you may be able to counteract them from getting worse by doing some toe exercises. If you have stiffness in the big toe, you may also benefit from doing some toe exercises.

Try some of the following at home or at work when you have free moments:

  • Curl and spread your toes, holding at each position for a few seconds. This may feel weird the first few times you do it since you haven’t been using your toes in this way. Do at least 10 repetitions, for 3 sets.
  • Grab marbles or a small towel with your toes. Move it from left to right, release, and then pick it up again and move it back. Do this at least 10 times, with each foot.
  • Get up onto your tippy toes while sitting or standing. You can get the full benefit if you stand, but you can still get in a good stretch if you do this while sitting.
  • Write out letters with your big toes. Use your big toes and write out the alphabet in the air. Your ankles will benefit from this exercise too!
  • Stand in mountain and tree pose with your toes spread out. These yoga poses will help strengthen your toes while you learn to balance with your toes.

If you are worried about toe deformities, corns, calluses, or pain in the big toe, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can provide you with details to the proper exercises you should do for your toe issues. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

As older loved ones continue to age, there are more and more things to worry about. From regular and more frequent doctor visits to keeping track of daily medications, seniors need a lot of support to continue to lead healthy lives.

Body parts also change and behave differently, including our skin, bones, joints, and muscles – and yes, even those parts of the feet. And that means that senior feet might need more attention, such as different footwear and some lifestyle changes.

Foot Wear

  • A good, comfortable, supportive pair of shoes could mean less foot and joint pain.
  • Shoes should match the environment in which they are used to prevent slips, trips, and falls. Use footwear with smooth outer soles on carpeted surfaces and use footwear with anti-slip grip outer soles on smooth, slippery surfaces.
  • Compression socks can help those who have problems with reduced circulation in the feet, from diabetes or other circulatory issues.

Foot Care

  • Inspect the feet daily. Foot problems can become harder to spot as senses begin to dull. Get into the habit of helping seniors check their feet for any changes in the skin, toenails, or foot structure (e.g. bunions, hammertoes).
  • Use softly padded mats around the house, wherever seniors stand for a long time, such as in front of the bathroom and kitchen sinks.
  • Install safety bars in bathrooms to prevent falls or trips getting in and out of the tub, or off the toilet.
  • Foot massagers or foot soak machines can help increase circulations in the feet and give relief for painful symptoms from overuse, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Continue to exercise and eat a nutritious diet to prevent problems and maintain foot health. Incorporate foods that are good for bones and soft tissues, like dairy (calcium), salmon (omega-3 fatty acids), and plenty of fruits and vegetables (vitamins and enzymes).

Senior feet need special care. Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot care needs. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 25, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear

Depending on the type of work you do, you may be required to wear specific types of shoes. Construction workers might need to wear heavy-duty boots, while nurses need to wear safety shoes to protect themselves from needles and other hazards. And while safety comes first, does that mean you should sacrifice on foot comfort and health?

While most work shoes do have some level of comfort and support built in, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s enough for your feet. This is especially true when your work shoes begin to wear down. 

The following are tips for making sure that your work shoes are working for YOU:

  • Make sure you have enough arch and heel support. This will prevent painful symptoms for people who have flat feet or tend to overpronate. Good heel cups help you keep your feet stable so that the Achilles’ tendon does not have to become strained.
  • Check the level of cushioning. Press down on the inner soles of the shoes every now and then to make sure that you still have cushioning to absorb impact to the bones and joints in the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.
  • Buy anti-slip outer soles. Work shoes should have adequate tread to make sure that you are not at high risk for slipping on clean floors or on wet, slick surfaces. 
  • Get measured each time you buy work shoes. The best time to buy shoes, especially work shoes (which you will spend 35+ hours wearing each week), is in the afternoon, when your feet are a bit swollen from walking or standing during the day. 
  • Avoid shoes that make your feet feel cramped. Shoes with tight toe boxes do not always “break in”. Scrunching your feet into shoes that feel cramped are more likely to leave you with worse symptoms of bunions, blisters, or hammertoes.
  • Look for signs of wearing out or breaking down. If they look or feel like they are worn down, they probably are. If the insole or outer sole is very much reduced from when you first bought the work shoes, it’s a sign that your shoes are not working for you. Additionally, if there are cuts, scrapes, or broken parts of the shoes, it’s definitely time to replace the shoes.
  • Replace shoes approximately every 6 months. Typically, work shoes can go about 3-500 miles before they need to be replaced. Be good to your feet and replace them instead of trying to wear shoes until they are no longer usable.

For some of you, work shoes might mean high heels or flats. The same tips above apply, but the safety features might not be built in.

Everyone who wears work shoes that are not quite fitting properly or comfortably, you may benefit from using orthotic inserts. For those with specific shoe needs, our podiatrist can help you with custom orthotics. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your working feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment or orthotic device. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505