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By Crofton Podiatry
September 11, 2019
Category: Orthotics

While many of us can use our shoes and other footwear without support, some need a little extra.  Usually, this calls for something called an orthotic. Known generically as a shoe insert, an orthotic is more specialized and treats specific conditions that an ordinary store-bought item will not.

Conditions orthotics treat include:

  • High arches – supports foot arch to keep from overstretching and/or collapsing
  • Flat feet – strengthens the area, supports the foot, and helps with gait
  • Diabetes – can reduce foot stress to avoid foot ulcers, blisters
  • Plantar fasciitis – support area of the heel usually with cushioning
  • Bursitis – sensitive area of the foot can also be treated with cushioning
  • Arthritis – Usually a flexible orthotic will work best as it has more cushioning
  • Corrects balance and walking issues – help with proper foot placement and gait
  • Bunions – allows for a wider toe area relieving bunion irritation

Other conditions orthotics can treat include hammertoes, heel spurs, injuries to the foot and back pain.

There are two basic types of orthotics. They are:

  • Flexible – Made of a softer material to offer cushioning
  • Rigid – Made of a more solid and stronger material such as carbon fiber or plastic. Offers more support

Depending on the type of condition you are suffering from, an orthotic may only be part of the treatment. The best way to determine what works best is to see your podiatrist. They are professionally trained to diagnose and recognize issues that may or may not require an orthotic.

Your first step to treat many of the conditions above may be to use a store-bought shoe insert but if this doesn’t work, a custom made orthotic may be needed. One issue many people ignore is making sure they have properly fitting shoes before moving to an orthotic. Make sure your footwear fits first. Proper fitting footwear is always important for good foot health.

By Crofton Podiatry
March 27, 2019
Category: Diabetes
Tags: corns   calluses   bunions   flat feet   Diabetes   Hammertoes  

There are many causes for foot problems. One of the most serious, however, is diabetes. Today, there are approximately 100 million Americans with diabetes. World estimates run to 371 million with 187 that don’t know they do. Diabetes is a condition where there is too much blood glucose or blood sugar in your body. In order for our bodies to work properly, the glucose must get into our cells providing much needed energy. To help do so, insulin must be taken. Feet then need special care.

Too much glucose can damage our eyes, kidneys and nerves. Diabetes can cause strokes, heart disease and the need to surgically remove limbs, so it is important to take your insulin on a regular basis.

Risk factors for diabetes include:

  • High blood pressure. High blood pressure can damage your body’s ability to pump blood.
  • Obesity. Being overweight which many people are.
  • Family history. If your brothers, sisters or parent has type 2 diabetes.
  • Age. If you are 45 years old or older.
  • Lack of Exercise. Being active less than 3 days per week.

Foot problems associated with diabetes:

  • Corns. Increased layers of skin on your foot on the small toes or outside of the foot.
  • Calluses. Thickened skin between toes or at the widest part of your foot.
  • Bunions. Deformity of the big toe joint.
  • Flat feet. The lack of an arch in your foot.
  • Hammertoes. Deformity of the toes where they bend in at the middle joint.

Early signs of diabetes include:

  • Urination. An increased need to urinate.
  • Increased thirst. A constant desire to drink liquids.
  • Increased appetite. Constant hunger.
  • Exhaustion. Feeling unduly tired.
  • Vision problems. Blurred vision and difficulty seeing.
  • Weight loss. Losing weight unexpectedly.
  • Wounds. Cuts or bruises slow to heal.
  • Numbness. Peripheral neuropathy is a numb or tingling sensations in your limbs or feet

If you believe you may have diabetes or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
January 16, 2019
Category: Seniors Foot Care
Tags: corns   calluses   Orthotics   Ulcers   arthritis   Hammertoes   Diabetic   ingrown   odor   neuromas   foot exams   rashes   exercises   swollen  

As older loved ones age, it’s even more important that caregivers look to taking care of the feet. With age comes many complex health issues, including ones that affect mobility like arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, diabetes, and heart problems. In some cases, the feet can be the first to experience issues associated with many of these problems, even pointing you in the right direction when it comes to a diagnosis.

Here are some ways to care for senior feet and why they are important:

  • Regular hygiene – It’s important to wash the feet with soap and warm water every day to prevent bacterial and fungal infections. If the skin tends to get dry, apply some moisturizer. Keep in mind that even if seniors are not as active, the feet can sweat and develop an unpleasant odor due to bacteria.
  • Frequent foot exams – While helping your loved one wash up, inspect for any new skin issues, like cuts, scrapes, rashes, skin breakdown, or even ulcers. Depending on other health issues he or she might have, their skin may have trouble healing properly, or even feeling that there is a problem. For example, diabetic patients may begin to lose feeling in their feet due to diabetic neuropathy. This is caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the nerves. If you don’t pay attention, a wound can become an infected ulcer, requiring immediate treatment.
  • Proper toenail trimming – Toenails need to be cut straight across. Otherwise, they may become ingrown and cause pain. Additionally, allowing them to get too long can cause them to break and cause pain.
  • Daily exercises – Keeping feet strong and flexible is part of keeping them healthy. Encourage foot exercises, which will help reduce the risk of falls and also increase circulation in the feet. Seniors who are mostly sedentary are prone to swollen feet, and moving the feet can reduce that risk.
  • Make sure the shoes fit – Make sure that they are wearing the correct sized shoes so that they don’t have to worry about painful toe conditions like hammertoes, neuromas, or corns and calluses. If they have a foot deformity requiring special shoes, bring them in to get custom orthotics.

Regular checkups with our podiatrist should also be a part of that care. Remember, the feet can often indicate a larger health issue. Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your older loved ones’ foot conditions. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

Did you know that a burning desire to serve your country is not enough to join the military? There are many obstacles that can stop you from joining the military. Good physical and mental health, as well as a high school level of education, are necessary starting points to being able to enlist.

Among the many qualifications needed to join the military are those related to your physical health. You wouldn’t be surprised, then, that your feet need to be in tip-top shape to be able to perform your military duties.

There are many foot conditions that can keep you from serving, including:

  • Unhealed fractures at the time of applying. Even if they will heal soon, you need to be able to perform all functions before you can officially enlist.
  • Implanted orthopedic devices (such as titanium plates) that align bones. If you’ve broken a bone or had orthopedic problems that require a permanent fixture, you are likely unable to enlist.
  • Any joint replacement. This includes the big toe joint, due to arthritis.
  • Any deformity or condition that interferes with walking, marching, running or jumping, OR that interferes with wearing military footwear. These can include toe deformities (like hammertoes), uncorrected clubfoot, and neuromas.
  • Flat feet that need prescription shoes or orthotics. This would mean that you cannot use standard military footwear.
  • Chronic plantar fasciitis. Chronic pain while bearing weight on the feet will disqualify you from military service.
  • Severely ingrown toenails. If they are infected or causing you pain at the time of enlisting, they will disqualify you.
  • Any other injuries or conditions that will prevent them from passing the medical tests.

Some of these issues are treatable, so it’s best to see our podiatrist right away if you are thinking of enlisting. Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your foot conditions. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505 today! We provide services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
September 05, 2018
Category: toe deformities
Tags: corns   bunions   Diabetes   Hammertoes   claw toe   curly toes  

If your toes look different from other people’s toes, there’s a good chance that you have a toe deformity. It can make you uncomfortable to take off your shoes or wear open-toed sandals. Read on to see what kind of toe deformity you might have – and to see if they can be helped.

Bunions and Tailor’s bunions – With this type of deformity, the big toe joint (or the small toe joint) is enlarged. Pressure on the big or small toe joints causes a bony spur to develop. You’ll notice a bump on the side of the joint, which can be painful if it is not cushioned in your shoes. Additionally, bunions can cause the big toes to point toward the other toes, rather than straight.

  • Treatment options include padding in the shoes, toe exercises, and in severe cases, surgery to set the bone straight and remove the bony spur.

Hammertoes – When shoes do not fit properly and the toes are cramped, toes can become bent. The muscles in the toes become tight and can eventually become rigid. Toes form a bent shape and can appear clenched, which is where the name of the deformity comes from. The unnatural shape can make it more likely for you to have pain from corns at the bent joint.

  • Help your toes by buying shoes with roomy toe boxes, using corn pads, and doing toe exercises to strengthen them and make them flexible.

Claw Toe – Certain diseases that damage nerves can cause foot muscles to weaken. This condition causes the toes to curl downward in a claw-like shape. When they are bent out of shape, the joints can become irritated and cause corns to develop.

  • Those with diabetes and alcoholic neuropathy should pay attention to the toes. Early detection is key to easier treatment. Toe exercises and splints can help to keep the toes in the proper shape.

Curly toes, underlapping, and overlapping toes – These deformities are usually present from birth and can be treated early as the foot develops.

  • Stretching, taping, and maybe even surgery can help to release the toes from the curled up shape.

Not all toe deformities are necessarily painful. However, they can cause long-term stress and side effects like corns. Exercising the toes can be very beneficial and can help reduce symptoms. If you need help improving your toe health and confidence, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our foot care team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office. We also serve the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD. 




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505