(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: Metatarsalgia

By Crofton Podiatry
August 01, 2018
Category: Bunion

Got bunions? They’re not as fun as Funyuns, but they may make you tear up like onions. The bony growths that stick out from the big toe joint can cause you pain and discomfort. For some, it’s manageable, but for others, putting shoes on can be painful and some footwear can be impossible to fit into.

Where did your bunions come from?

A bunion is a deformity at the base of the big toe. The bone behind the big toe joint is unstable and it can shift up and away, causing the big toe to turn in towards the other smaller toes. The constant pressure on that joint area from wearing shoes can cause a bony growth to develop. When left unchecked, the bony growth can become so large that the foot shape changes. The top of the big toe moves from pointing forward to pointing at the other toes. Fitting into sandals or other structured shoes with smaller toe boxes will be difficult.

What other things could happen when you have bunions?

When left untreated, bunions can cause further complications for your feet. Additional foot problems can arise, leading to other areas of pain and/or discomfort for your feet. The following complications can arise if bunions become severe:

  • Toe deformities: hammertoes, mallet toes, and overlapping toes can all occur because of the misalignment of the big toe. The big toe can push the smaller toes into different positions, especially while wearing shoes – and the long-term effect is that the toes become stiff in those positions.
  • Bursitis: Chronic inflammation of fluid-filled sacs (bursa) that provide cushioning around joints. As the big toe joint is irritated by footwear rubbing against the area sticking out, the bursae become inflamed and cause you pain.
  • Ball of foot pain: Also called metatarsalgia, it occurs when there is chronic inflammation of the balls of the feet. The bunion issue can cause you to want to transfer pressure onto your other toes and the rest of the midfoot, away from the bunion. The balls of the feet experience strain from overuse.

So if you have bunions, take steps to reduce worsening symptoms, for it can lead to further complications. Try some at-home treatments for your bunions and wear shoes that won’t aggravate your bunion pain. If you have a severe bunion and need help treating it, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle needs. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

 

In our last post, we spoke about when you should replace the shoes that you wear so that they will not cause harm to your feet. Now, we’d like to talk about a particular type of shoes (high heels) and how they can affect your foot health.

Whether it’s for work, going out to dinner, dancing, or special events, women have specific foot issues that can be aggravated by or attributed to wearing high heels on an almost-daily basis. The higher the heel of the shoes, the more pressure is placed on the forefoot. The midfoot, balls of the feet, and toes have to endure more strain, leading to more problems such as metatarsalgia, hammertoes, Morton’s neuroma, and/or bunions. Additionally, the tendons and ligaments along the foot and ankles must work harder to keep you stabilized throughout the day.

What’s worse, the high heels make your feet and ankles act like they are walking downhill all day. This means more strain (and therefore, pain) on the calves, knees, and back, throwing your alignment out of whack. So if you have been having back, neck, or shoulder pain, it may be caused by your shoes!

So then, what are my options?

  • If you feel that you have to wear high heels, try to find ways to get out of them periodically. You can take them off while you’re sitting at your desk, while driving, and while commuting. It will help reduce the risk of repetitive stress on the feet, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Also, as often as you can, stretch your feet and toes to release from their cramped environment. Doing a deep calf stretch, including pulling the toes back will be beneficial for your entire foot.
  • When you purchase high-heeled shoes, do your best to try them on and walk around in them for a bit to see if they feel comfortable. We would advise against assuming that shoes will break in. Pointy-toe shoes can squeeze your toes into uncomfortable positions, adding force to the big toe joint and directly onto the toes. Look for a wider toe box and a shoe that follows the natural curves of your feet. A thicker/chunkier heel will help with stabilization and balance, as will a good fit. Don’t buy shoes that are a little bit big or small – it has to fit well to reduce the risk of foot pain.
  • If your high heels seem comfortable but could use a bit of support, orthotic inserts, such as for the arches or the balls of your feet, you may experience less strain on the feet.

Do you have foot pain from wearing high heels on a daily basis? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you create custom orthotics. Contact our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
July 21, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions

After a long day of sports training or walking around in high heels, the balls of your feet may hurt. Unless you bring other shoes to change into, the route home can seem so long that you may be tempted to take your shoes off and go barefoot. So what’s going on?

Pain in the balls of your feet is generally referred to as metatarsalgia. The five bones between the toes and the arch are called the metatarsals. When one or more of the joints involving those bones becomes affected, it can become inflamed and cause you pain. People who repeatedly put pressure on the metatarsal joints may notice a callus there. 

What can cause metatarsalgia?

  • Uncomfortable and unsupportive shoes – Women who wear a lot of high heels will often notice this type of pain because they bear most of their weight on the balls of the feet while walking. Additionally, when anyone wears shoes that do not have good arch support or have toe boxes that are too narrow, it can cause irritation to the metatarsals. Poorly fitting shoes can also cause other issues like foot deformities that can put pressure on your metatarsals.

  • Intense training or exercise – Any activity that includes impact on the feet (e.g. walking or jumping) risks pain because of the forces that the midfoot endures.

  • Other conditions: Stress fractures, Morton’s Neuroma, Arthritis, Obesity – If you have trauma or repeated injury, you can develop broken or fractured bones that alters your gait in a way that applies pressure on the feet. Additionally, Morton’s Neuroma affects the third and fourth toes, with extra fibrous tissue growing around the nerve in the metatarsals that could cause pain. Furthermore, because arthritis affects the joints, the metatarsal joints are subject to arthritic pain. Finally, being overweight can also make you put more pressure at the forefoot, applying more pressure on the metatarsals.

How to ease pain

Because metatarsalgia is more of a condition to describe the pain in the ball of the feet, pain relief includes symptom management. In most cases, the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation) can help after a day of walking or exercise. Changing to more supportive and shoes can also help prevent and relieve symptoms. Some orthotics (like metatarsal pads) may be in order for those with deformities or pain from shoes, especially if you have specific work shoes that need to be worn.

When these treatments do not work, you may need to check for other conditions that may be contributing to metatarsalgia. If foot deformities like hammertoes are causing pain, surgery to correct that issue may be required. To find the best solution, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505