(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: Orthotics

By Crofton Podiatry
September 26, 2018
Category: Running

Whether it’s to fundraise for a good cause or to challenge yourself with a new activity, running (or walking) a 5K race can be a lot of fun! This is especially true if you join in with friends or family as you cross the finish line.

While 5Ks and other running events are healthy physical activities, they come with risks if you are not careful. The following are tips on how to get started with preparing for a 5K (or longer) running event:

  • Start slow. If you are not a runner, running a 5K without any preparation can be an exhausting activity. Walk or slowly jog the distance you’re training for to see how far it really is. Do not overdo it on the first go, as you might be left with blisters, painful shin splints, and/or shortness of breath. Doing too much too quickly can also lead to chronic Achilles tendonitis or other overuse injuries.
  • Build up endurance and speed. Again, start slow and practice running the 5K (or longer) distance. The more practice you get, the easier it will be on your body when it comes to actually running the race. Start with shorter distances and then make them longer as you train. Then, you might want to practice running the distance at a faster pace. (Hint: use music to help you stay at a steady pace)
  • Wear the right shoes. Are your feet sore or tired after your practice runs? It might mean that you are not wearing the right shoes. Make sure they fit you correctly, have ample cushioning on the inner sole, and are not wearing down on the outer sole. The extra cushion will reduce the impact on your joints!
  • Use orthotics. If your feet have a specific shape, such as flat feet, you may want to use orthotic inserts to get more support.
  • Rest, stretch, and hydrate. Be sure to rest enough so that your feet and ankles do not become injured with overuse injuries. Don’t forget to stretch and hydrate before and after each training as well!

Running a 5K without preparing for it can lead to injuries, so it’s important to start with the above tips. If you have pain from running, come to see us at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified foot doctor, Dr. Brad Toll. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 29, 2018
Category: ankle pain

Whether or not you realize it, the Achilles tendon is very highly utilized, and therefore prone to developing Achilles tendonitis. It is the largest and strongest tendon in the body, allowing the calf muscle to pull up on the heel bone. Any time your heel is raised off the ground, your Achilles tendon is in action.

The Achilles is prone to injury and inflammation because of the forces it endures and how often it is utilized. If the tendon becomes inflamed from overuse, it can be characterized as Achilles tendonitis.

Causes of Achilles tendonitis

For most instances of Achilles tendonitis, it occurs because of a sudden increase in intensity or duration of activity. A common injury for runners, adding a lot of sprinting or uphill running can cause inflammation and pain. For some, symptoms can set in as soon as you engage in an abrupt activity. For others, it can cause you chronic pain that can get worse over time.

When you are affected by Achilles tendonitis, you might feel:

  • Soreness, aching or burning pain in the back of the ankle or calf, especially after a workout.
  • Swelling along the back of the ankle
  • Tenderness or stiffness at the back of the ankle when you wake up.
  • Development of a bone spur where the ankle meets the calf (after long-term aggravation of the Achilles tendon).

What you can do to ease the pain of Achilles tendonitis:

  • Stop what you’re doing! The Achilles tendon takes longer to heal because of the low blood flow. Give your ankle time to heal before you put it through more work. If our podiatrist believes you need to immobilize your feet, he’ll prescribe an orthotic brace or cast.
  • Stretch the Achilles tendon to relieve tightness or stiffness.
  • Get a foot massage. Roll a frozen water bottle or another cylindrical object up and down your lower leg. A partner can also help you release painful symptoms.
  • Use orthotics. Orthotic inserts can help to provide more support to your feet and ankles. Our podiatrist can help you figure out how to best utilize them.

In extreme cases, surgery might be necessary to correct a chronic case of Achilles tendonitis. Make an appointment today at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your family’s foot and ankle care needs. We provide services to the Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 22, 2018
Category: Children's Feet
Tags: Orthotics   walk   inward   supportive shoes   gait  

Got your Back-to-School lists in hand? Clothing companies and office supply stores are ready to get your kiddos equipped with the latest and greatest. Backpacks, pencil cases, loose leaf paper, and of course, the best locker supplies, are at the top of the list. But don’t forget about those rapidly growing feet!

Get measured!

Children’s feet can grow at such a pace that they might need new shoes within three months (depending on their developmental stage)! While you might not add “get new shoes” to your back-to-school shopping list, you might want to add “measure feet for new shoes.” This way, if their feet have indeed grown, you’ll already be in a shoe store!

Observe their walk

Have your children walk in a straight line in their current shoes. Are they walking in a heel-to-toe gait or are they flat stomping? Do their ankles seem to roll inward or outward? Are their feet pointing inward or outward? Are the outer soles more worn down on one side than the other? Have they complained about any pain?

If you notice any of these issues, it might be a good time to review whether or not their shoes are supportive enough. Supportive shoes (with adequate arch and heel support) can help to reduce the risk of foot problems from developing. However, if your child complains of pain or if you notice that their gait is off, you may want to consider orthotics to correct issues and reduce pain.

Function OVER Fashion or Convenience

The “in” thing at school might be backless sandals or the latest Nike LeBron 15’s. While popularity might seem to be the most important thing for children and teenagers, remind them that uncomfortable or painful feet can get in the way of that. Encourage your children to find a balance between fashion and function, especially if they walk long distances to and from school. Oh! And don’t forget those socks! Not wearing socks with closed-toe shoes can really make for a stink fest (and talk about embarrassing smelly feet!).

Additionally, we warn parents against simply buying a pair of shoes for your children without them present. Unless they tried the specific pair of shoes on very recently, it’s in your children’s best interest to try the shoes on themselves. Each pair of shoes fits a bit differently, so it’s best to get a feel for them in the store.

If your child has been complaining of foot pain, or if you notice that your children are walking abnormally, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your family’s foot and ankle care needs. Our Crofton, MD office serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 08, 2018
Category: Foot health
Tags: swelling   Athlete's Foot   Gout   Orthotics   Diabetes   surgery   pain   arthritis   injury   psoriasis   fungal   ingrown   cracked heels  

There are some obvious times to visit a foot doctor:

  1. Foot injury – A podiatrist can help you find the best way to take care of foot injuries, with anything from orthotics to surgery.
  2. Ankle injury – Yep! Podiatrists also take care of ankle issues.
  3. Foot and ankle pain – If you suddenly notice pain or have ongoing pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time or at-home treatment, our podiatry team will help you figure out what’s going on.podiatrist

Beyond the more obvious reasons for visiting a podiatrist, some other very important times to call our office for foot health care are:

  1. Annual foot examinations – Some foot and ankle issues can arise with subtle symptoms. Catching a problem early can allow for a simpler intervention. Additionally, since a foot doctor is a fully-licensed medical professional, they can help diagnose other problems that may present symptoms affecting the feet. In fact, some patients learn about their diabetes after coming for a foot problem checkup.
  2. Conditions or diseases like arthritis, gout, or diabetes – Speaking of diabetes, folks with certain diseases can develop side effects that affect the feet. A podiatrist can help you manage symptoms like pain or numbness.
  3. Swelling or numbness – If you have swelling or numbness that is unexplained or persists for a long time, come in to check for underlying conditions.
  4. New deformities or changes in skin – Sometimes changes in the feet go unnoticed compared to changes in other parts of the body. That’s why it’s important to check the feet often for any changes that might need treatment. Additionally, severely dry, cracked heels, as well as other conditions like Athlete’s foot or psoriasis may require podiatrist help for treatment.
  5. Ingrown or fungal toenails – Most times, moderate to severe cases of ingrown or fungal toenails requires the attention of a podiatrist. Trying to treat these toenail conditions at home may be fruitless or even more harmful (e.g. trying to pry out ingrown toenails can lead to infection).

As you can see, there are many reasons why you might want to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Please contact us and visit our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
May 21, 2018
Category: Arthritis
Tags: Gout   Orthotics   arthritis  

If you’ve got arthritis, everyday activities that used to be simple have probably become more difficult. You may have to adjust how you do things with your hands, wrists, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. The joint inflammation can affect how long you can stand, walk, and work because of pain, stiffness, and/or swelling.

Don’t let arthritis keep you down! Keep living your best life by incorporating some of the following changes.

At Home:

  • Mats – Use foam mats wherever you tend to stand for long periods of time, such as in front of kitchen and bathroom sinks, as well as in front of the stove.
  • Rugs or Carpet – Invest in thick rugs or install carpeting in your home to reduce the impact on your feet, ankles, and knees.
  • Indoor Shoes – You may want to buy highly-cushioned shoes to wear indoors, especially if you have hardwood or tile shoes.

At Work:

  • Take breaks often and move your feet and ankles. Sitting or standing for a long time can cause them to become stiff and swollen.
  • Also, it’s best to stay hydrated to help reduce inflammation and increase circulation.

During Leisure Activities:

  • Schedule in breaks whenever you engage in fun activities. From hikes to swimming, and exploring a new city, take a rest so that your foot and ankle joints do not become inflamed (like with gout). If your feet become too swollen or inflamed, you may not be able to participate in any other activities the rest of the day.

For Your Body:

  • You may have to adjust the types of activities that you can perform, but that doesn’t mean you should just stay home and do nothing. Find other fun activities that your body can handle.
  • Continue to exercise and eat nutritiously. Your physical therapist or occupational therapist can help you find exercises to help you stay mobile and prevent joint stiffness. Watch your weight and eat plenty of anti-inflammatory foods.
  • Wear comfortable, cushioned shoes since outside irritation can make your joint inflammation worse. If your feet have become deformed from arthritis, custom orthotics may be necessary.

Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505