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Posts for tag: Plantar Fasciitis

By Crofton Podiatry
March 05, 2019
Category: Plantar Fasciitis

With today’s push for more and more healthy lifestyles, many people are turning to physical activity to do so. Some of this includes running or jogging which is a great way to lose weight or just keep in shape. With this, though, can come foot pain caused by a condition known as Plantar Fasciitis.

Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes.  Most likely you will immediately feel a stabbing pain in your foot as soon as you wake. The pain may improve during the day, but most likely will return after standing for long periods of time or rising suddenly from a seated position.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis include:

  • Age - Common between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Exercise - Activities that place a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, ballet and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat-feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking affecting weight distribution.
  • Obesity - Excessive weight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, nurses and others who spend a lot of time hours walking or standing on hard surfaces.

Ignoring Plantar Fasciitis symptoms can cause further foot, knee, hip or back problems so seeing a podiatrist is crucial. Treatments include:

  • Examination - Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - To check damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Medicine- Doctor prescribed pain meds.
  • Stretching - Simple foot stretches to help alleviate the pain.
  • Therapy - including Physical therapy, Night Splints and the use of orthotics.
  • Surgery - at times this may be the last resort if the pain is not subsiding.

If you believe you run the risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis then you will want to start losing weight, always wear good running shoes, choose footwear that is supportive, has good arch support and absorbs shock well. Such common-sense approaches may just keep your feet pain free and you better able to improve your overall health.

If you have any issues or notice pain while trying any exercise, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
January 30, 2019
Category: Heel Pain
Tags: running   Plantar Fasciitis   Football   soccer   sneakers  

Once you begin to experience pain along the bottoms of the feet, due to plantar fasciitis, it can become a chronic problem. The pain on the soles of the feet occurs because of inflammation from overstrained ligaments. Each day that the feet have overwork or strain to stabilize the feet in unsupportive shoes, the plantar fascia can become aggravated.

If you have chronic plantar fasciitis that causes you nightly pain, you may want to limit the following activities:

  • Running – The repeated impact on the bottoms of the feet, as well as the strain of running or jogging for long distances, can cause chronic pain. To prevent getting chronic pain from running, make sure you use supportive running shoes with ample cushioning and support. Replace sneakers as soon as they seem to be wearing down. Folks with plantar fasciitis can continue to run as the symptoms usually present at rest. That puts injured runners at risk of worsening symptoms. Instead, at the first sign of symptoms, be sure to treat the condition.
  • Plyometrics – These are activities that incorporate cardiovascular exercise, as well as strength building. It reinforces the fast-twitch muscles in the legs. These exercises include jumping and can aggravate plantar fasciitis each time you land hard on the feet. Box jumps, jump squats, and long jumps are all exercises that can aggravate chronic plantar fasciitis pain.
  • High-impact sports or activities – Like running and plyometrics, any exercise involving high impact on the feet can cause aggravated plantar fasciitis pain. Constant pounding of the grass or pavement, like in football or soccer can cause inflammation of the plantar fascia.

Stretching, icing, massage, and rest are helpful in relieving symptoms related to chronic plantar fasciitis. Wear shoes with lots of cushioning and support to minimize the development of symptoms throughout the day. If you have to, include the use of over-the-counter or custom-made orthotics.

If you feel that your plantar fasciitis pain is becoming worse, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will help you find treatment for your foot pain. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

Did you know that a burning desire to serve your country is not enough to join the military? There are many obstacles that can stop you from joining the military. Good physical and mental health, as well as a high school level of education, are necessary starting points to being able to enlist.

Among the many qualifications needed to join the military are those related to your physical health. You wouldn’t be surprised, then, that your feet need to be in tip-top shape to be able to perform your military duties.

There are many foot conditions that can keep you from serving, including:

  • Unhealed fractures at the time of applying. Even if they will heal soon, you need to be able to perform all functions before you can officially enlist.
  • Implanted orthopedic devices (such as titanium plates) that align bones. If you’ve broken a bone or had orthopedic problems that require a permanent fixture, you are likely unable to enlist.
  • Any joint replacement. This includes the big toe joint, due to arthritis.
  • Any deformity or condition that interferes with walking, marching, running or jumping, OR that interferes with wearing military footwear. These can include toe deformities (like hammertoes), uncorrected clubfoot, and neuromas.
  • Flat feet that need prescription shoes or orthotics. This would mean that you cannot use standard military footwear.
  • Chronic plantar fasciitis. Chronic pain while bearing weight on the feet will disqualify you from military service.
  • Severely ingrown toenails. If they are infected or causing you pain at the time of enlisting, they will disqualify you.
  • Any other injuries or conditions that will prevent them from passing the medical tests.

Some of these issues are treatable, so it’s best to see our podiatrist right away if you are thinking of enlisting. Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your foot conditions. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505 today! We provide services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
December 05, 2018
Category: Foot Odor

The discomfort of wet feet from hyperhidrosis may be enough for you to want to seek professional treatment from our podiatrist. Even for those of you whose hyperhidrosis isn’t always so severe, you may still experience some complications. These secondary effects often need podiatric treatment, so we encourage you to take precautions to prevent these problems if you tend to sweat a lot.

  • Blistering – If you have lived with hyperhidrosis, you know that this is common anytime you run. Blisters form on the toes as your feet slide to the front of your shoes as you dash forward. Try wrapping your toes in gauze or bandages to add padding to your toes before putting socks on. You may have to take a break and rewrap them if you tend to blister or bleed a lot during your running or sporting event (e.g. soccer).
  • Fungal growth – fungi love warm, moist places. Your shoes mimic this environment that allows fungi to thrive and make you prone to fungal infections like athlete’s foot or fungal toenails. Allow your shoes to fully dry before you wear them again. Never re-wear socks. Always wash your feet at the end of each day.
  • Foot odor – The fungus can also cause you to have an embarrassing odor on your feet, your socks, and in your shoes. Be sure to keep good hygiene and treat fungal infections to prevent ongoing odor problems.
  • Foot strain from instability in the shoes – You can develop overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis and Achilles tendinitis if your feet have to work hard to stabilize within your shoes. Supportive shoes with arch pads and heel cups can help your feet stabilize. Change your socks midday if they tend to get drenched as you go about your day.

Not only can our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, help you with the complications of hyperhidrosis, but he can also help you treat your hyperhidrosis. Say goodbye to embarrassing and frustrating sweaty feet! Make an appointment by calling Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

If you’ve been a runner for a while, you know how much your feet endure when you hit the pavement. A long run or even a quick sprint can leave your feet throbbing, aching, or in pain. Long-term, you might suffer from foot problems such as chronic plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.

Still, you can’t beat that runner’s high, right? If you can’t seem to resist that daily run, here are Top 5 Tips you can use to take care of your Runners’ Feet:

  1. Start slowly and increase slowly. Beginners should start with a slow pace and a short distance and increase as experience grows. If you increase speed or incline too much, too quickly, you can end up straining the tendons and ligaments in your feet and ankles.
  2. Use the right shoes. Running shoes should be supportive and have adequate cushioning to reduce the impact on the bones and joints. Repetitive pounding on the hard surfaces can lead to weakened bones that are prone to fractures. Arches and heel cups will keep the feet stable in the shoes. If you have existing foot problems, you can use orthotic inserts to prevent worsening symptoms. 
  3. Don’t skimp on socks. Wearing shoes without socks can lead to irritation and blisters on the skin of the feet. Sweaty feet can make the shoes smelly, and increase the chances of bacterial or fungal infection like Athlete’s foot. Always wear a clean, fresh pair of socks for running to reduce the likelihood of foot issues.
  4. Stretch the toes, feet, ankles, and calves. Always warm up and cool down, including stretching of the lower extremities. Strengthening the toes can help to reduce chances of toe deformities and help you stabilize your feet in the shoes.
  5. Practice good foot hygiene. After a good sweaty running session, you’ll want to make sure to wash your feet (probably while you shower) with soap and warm water and then change into a new pair of socks. If you run every day, you may want to invest in more than one pair of shoes so that you can allow them to dry out completely between running sessions. Keep toenails short and take care of any ingrown toenails or fungal toenails. Additionally, any cuts and scrapes can become more inflamed while running, so be sure to treat them promptly.

If you’ve sustained an injury while running, or if you have concerns with whether or not your feet are in shape for running, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505