(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: arthritis

By Crofton Podiatry
November 27, 2018
Category: Footwear
Tags: arthritis   Diabetic   ulcer   fungi  

Depending on your cultural background, you may or may not wear shoes in the house. There might be a good reason for either, but in case you haven’t thought of some of these, let’s discuss whether or not you should wear footwear indoors.

Why you might want to wear shoes in the house:

  • Diabetic feet – One of the possible complications of diabetes is nerve damage from high blood sugar levels. Your feet can experience tingling or complete loss of sensation. This means that if you drop a glass cup and it shatters, you might step on a sharp piece that wasn’t picked up, and not even realize it. This could lead to an open wound that doesn’t heal (ulcer). Wearing shoes in the house could protect your feet in those situations. If wearing outdoor shoes does not appeal to you, buy some shoes that are for indoor use only.
  • Arthritic feet – There are many joints in the feet that can be affected by arthritis and gout. Wearing orthotic, supportive shoes can help reduce the repetitive impact that walking barefoot on hardwood floors can have. Your feet can be cushioned and comfortable as you go about your day at home.
  • Outdoor pets – If you share a home with a furry friend that goes in and out of the house, you might also be fine with wearing your shoes in and out of the house as well. Otherwise, you’ll probably want to clean their paws every time you take them in and out of the house as they track dirt and germs in.

Why you might NOT want to wear shoes in the house:

  • Dirt – Sure, a little dirt never hurt anyone, but now you’ve got more cleaning to do on a regular basis as your shoes track in dirt and, on rainy days, mud.
  • Germs – Some of that dirt and grime that lives on the bottom of your shoes include many harmful microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, and even viruses. Think about that public bathroom you just went to where people might have missed the toilet bowl. Now you’ve stepped in that and brought it home with you! Furthermore, if you wear shoes and then take them off to be barefoot, you risk your feet getting infections from the germs carried in.
  • Children – Speaking of dirt and germs, while they can help build your children’s immune systems, it may not be the best idea to have them crawling on the floor on unclean floors. You know that they put their hands and mouths on everything, wherever they go. So why not keep your home free of the dirt and germs that your shoes carry in?

If you do wear shoes into the house, you might want to make sure to have slippers for the times when you are not in closed-toed shoes. This can help reduce infections and the spreading of germs.

Of course, if you have any problems with diabetes, arthritis, or skin infections on your feet, come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 08, 2018
Category: Foot health
Tags: swelling   Athlete's Foot   Gout   Orthotics   Diabetes   surgery   pain   arthritis   injury   psoriasis   fungal   ingrown   cracked heels  

There are some obvious times to visit a foot doctor:

  1. Foot injury – A podiatrist can help you find the best way to take care of foot injuries, with anything from orthotics to surgery.
  2. Ankle injury – Yep! Podiatrists also take care of ankle issues.
  3. Foot and ankle pain – If you suddenly notice pain or have ongoing pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time or at-home treatment, our podiatry team will help you figure out what’s going on.podiatrist

Beyond the more obvious reasons for visiting a podiatrist, some other very important times to call our office for foot health care are:

  1. Annual foot examinations – Some foot and ankle issues can arise with subtle symptoms. Catching a problem early can allow for a simpler intervention. Additionally, since a foot doctor is a fully-licensed medical professional, they can help diagnose other problems that may present symptoms affecting the feet. In fact, some patients learn about their diabetes after coming for a foot problem checkup.
  2. Conditions or diseases like arthritis, gout, or diabetes – Speaking of diabetes, folks with certain diseases can develop side effects that affect the feet. A podiatrist can help you manage symptoms like pain or numbness.
  3. Swelling or numbness – If you have swelling or numbness that is unexplained or persists for a long time, come in to check for underlying conditions.
  4. New deformities or changes in skin – Sometimes changes in the feet go unnoticed compared to changes in other parts of the body. That’s why it’s important to check the feet often for any changes that might need treatment. Additionally, severely dry, cracked heels, as well as other conditions like Athlete’s foot or psoriasis may require podiatrist help for treatment.
  5. Ingrown or fungal toenails – Most times, moderate to severe cases of ingrown or fungal toenails requires the attention of a podiatrist. Trying to treat these toenail conditions at home may be fruitless or even more harmful (e.g. trying to pry out ingrown toenails can lead to infection).

As you can see, there are many reasons why you might want to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Please contact us and visit our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
July 18, 2018
Category: Foot Injuries

Most folks have endured some type of traumatic injury to the feet, whether by stubbing a toe, dropping a heavy object, or colliding with someone or something while playing sports. The pain can feel excruciating, especially to the top of the feet, where there isn’t much padding around the bones. Go on, feel the top of the feet – you’ll probably feel the long metatarsal bones across the top of your feet.

  • Pain: The immediate sensation you’ll likely feel is pain at the impact spot. The length and severity of the pain will depend on the force of the impact and the surface area injury. Walking or moving the feet can be very painful.
  • Bruise/Contusion: After a bit of time, you might notice some redness and subsequent bruising. Since the visual indication of bruising is a result of bleeding beneath the skin, you may or may not see the typical black and blue of bruising. It will depend on whether or not there is internal bleeding, and where it happens.
  • Bone bruise or hairline fractures: After an injury to bones, blood and fluids can enter and surround the area of the bone. This can happen when the bone is injured, but not enough to become a fracture. On the other hand, severe injury can lead to bone fractures (cracks) in the feet.
  • Inflammation and/or swelling: Depending on the location and severity of the injury, the soft tissues and bone areas can become inflamed or swollen. You may notice a bump from fluids gathering, or pain because of inflammation near nerves. When inflammation affects nerves, it can cause pain in larger areas of the foot (even causing pain to the bottom areas of the foot, due to an injury at the top).
  • Joint swelling: If the injury is at or near a joint, it can cause stiffness, swelling, or tenderness to the joint. It can even be the cause of post-traumatic arthritis.

Pain management after traumatic injury:

  1. RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Additionally, if the pain and inflammation are severe, you can take NSAIDs to reduce symptoms.
  2. If the injury does not get better or gets worse in a couple of days, it’s important to come see us and make sure that bones are not fractured and soft tissues are not torn. Our podiatrist can help you find the best treatment, which may include using a brace or other orthotic device.

We can help you feel better! Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our podiatry team is ready to help improve your foot health at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
May 21, 2018
Category: Arthritis
Tags: Gout   Orthotics   arthritis  

If you’ve got arthritis, everyday activities that used to be simple have probably become more difficult. You may have to adjust how you do things with your hands, wrists, hips, knees, ankles, and feet. The joint inflammation can affect how long you can stand, walk, and work because of pain, stiffness, and/or swelling.

Don’t let arthritis keep you down! Keep living your best life by incorporating some of the following changes.

At Home:

  • Mats – Use foam mats wherever you tend to stand for long periods of time, such as in front of kitchen and bathroom sinks, as well as in front of the stove.
  • Rugs or Carpet – Invest in thick rugs or install carpeting in your home to reduce the impact on your feet, ankles, and knees.
  • Indoor Shoes – You may want to buy highly-cushioned shoes to wear indoors, especially if you have hardwood or tile shoes.

At Work:

  • Take breaks often and move your feet and ankles. Sitting or standing for a long time can cause them to become stiff and swollen.
  • Also, it’s best to stay hydrated to help reduce inflammation and increase circulation.

During Leisure Activities:

  • Schedule in breaks whenever you engage in fun activities. From hikes to swimming, and exploring a new city, take a rest so that your foot and ankle joints do not become inflamed (like with gout). If your feet become too swollen or inflamed, you may not be able to participate in any other activities the rest of the day.

For Your Body:

  • You may have to adjust the types of activities that you can perform, but that doesn’t mean you should just stay home and do nothing. Find other fun activities that your body can handle.
  • Continue to exercise and eat nutritiously. Your physical therapist or occupational therapist can help you find exercises to help you stay mobile and prevent joint stiffness. Watch your weight and eat plenty of anti-inflammatory foods.
  • Wear comfortable, cushioned shoes since outside irritation can make your joint inflammation worse. If your feet have become deformed from arthritis, custom orthotics may be necessary.

Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
December 29, 2017
Category: Arthritis

You may have heard older loved ones talk about how the weather affects their joints. Days characterized by poor weather seem to make symptoms worse, especially when it’s raining or cold. For those who struggle with arthritis pain, even the day-to-day can be difficult; so when the winter chill rolls in, joint pain management can be more challenging. And of course, the many joints present in the feet and ankles are also prone to feeling more achy, stiff, and/or painful.

We mentioned some ways you can care for your arthritic feet in a previous post, but the following are some additional tips for foot care and pain management in the cold winter weather:

  • Dress warmly. Always wear socks when you go outside – double up if you get cold easily. If your feet get cold easily, even indoors, wear socks or slippers (with non-slip grips on the bottom for smooth floors; smooth bottomed socks and slippers for carpet).
  • Eat nutritiously, including vitamin D supplements, especially if you have osteoarthritis. Less hours of sunlight and winter weather can mean a vitamin D deficiency for many. Also be sure to add plenty of sources of omega-3 fatty acids for joint health.
  • Stay physically active, both inside and outside. Taking brisk walks and doing aerobic exercises (on an exercise mat) are great ways to keep your blood pumping and your feet and ankles engaged.
  • Keep up with physical therapy, if that is part of your arthritis care. It may even be beneficial to start physical therapy during the weather for worse symptoms. Talk to your physician or our podiatrist for more information.
  • Wear safe shoes and be careful with winter activities and sports. Over-the-counter orthotic inserts may help, but you may need custom orthotics to reduce painful symptoms. If you must go outside in the cold or snow, be sure to wear warm shoes that have non-skid outer soles.
  • Stay hydrated to help with circulation. Some studies suggest that dehydration can make you more sensitive to pain!
  • Take warm baths and get foot massages. Warm baths, hot tubs, or warm water swimming pools can be helpful in relieving arthritis pain. Additionally, find relief by pampering your feet with a foot soak and massage.

If the winter weather has got your feet or ankles in pain, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry to make sure it isn’t something else causing the pain. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505