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By Crofton Podiatry
September 11, 2019
Category: Orthotics

While many of us can use our shoes and other footwear without support, some need a little extra.  Usually, this calls for something called an orthotic. Known generically as a shoe insert, an orthotic is more specialized and treats specific conditions that an ordinary store-bought item will not.

Conditions orthotics treat include:

  • High arches – supports foot arch to keep from overstretching and/or collapsing
  • Flat feet – strengthens the area, supports the foot, and helps with gait
  • Diabetes – can reduce foot stress to avoid foot ulcers, blisters
  • Plantar fasciitis – support area of the heel usually with cushioning
  • Bursitis – sensitive area of the foot can also be treated with cushioning
  • Arthritis – Usually a flexible orthotic will work best as it has more cushioning
  • Corrects balance and walking issues – help with proper foot placement and gait
  • Bunions – allows for a wider toe area relieving bunion irritation

Other conditions orthotics can treat include hammertoes, heel spurs, injuries to the foot and back pain.

There are two basic types of orthotics. They are:

  • Flexible – Made of a softer material to offer cushioning
  • Rigid – Made of a more solid and stronger material such as carbon fiber or plastic. Offers more support

Depending on the type of condition you are suffering from, an orthotic may only be part of the treatment. The best way to determine what works best is to see your podiatrist. They are professionally trained to diagnose and recognize issues that may or may not require an orthotic.

Your first step to treat many of the conditions above may be to use a store-bought shoe insert but if this doesn’t work, a custom made orthotic may be needed. One issue many people ignore is making sure they have properly fitting shoes before moving to an orthotic. Make sure your footwear fits first. Proper fitting footwear is always important for good foot health.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 01, 2019
Category: Shin Splints
Tags: podiatrist   flat feet   footwear   stretch   shin splint   insoles  

With warmer weather on its way, Spring promises to provide more and more opportunities for outdoor activities. Basketball, running, tennis and other sports all require the constant pounding of feet against the ground, and with this, can follow something called a shin splint. What is a shin splint? Defined as a common foot-related injury, shin splints, also known as tibial stress syndrome, is caused when stress on your shinbone and the connective tissues that attach your muscles to your bones become inflamed and painful, making running or even walking very difficult.

Causes of Shin Splints:

  • Flat feet – The lack of an arch to absorb shock every time the foot hits the ground.
  • Poor fitting footwear – footwear must fit your feet and provide overall support, especially for hi-impact sports or activities.
  • Failing to stretch before activities - It is very important to stretch the foot and leg muscles before any activity to loosen them and get the blood circulating.
  • Weak ankles, hips and core muscles – as the body works in unison, each works in tandem to help the foot better absorb shock.

How to Treat Shin Splints:

  • Rest – if injured, take time off from your activity giving your body time to heal.
  • Ice – putting ice on the affected area will reduce pain and inflammation. It is recommended you do this for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 to 3 days or until it is better.
  • Insoles – wear store bought or custom insoles or inserts that strengthen your arch.
  • Anti-inflammatory medicine – ibuprofen or other medicine. Be especially careful to use only as directed. Your podiatrist would be the best source of information.
  • Surface choice – if you’re a runner who likes to run on hard pavement, consider finding a softer surface like an artificial track often found at high schools or other public areas.
  • Medical exam – see your podiatrist to make sure you do not have any other related injury.

If you believe you are prone to or already have shin splints or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
March 27, 2019
Category: Diabetes
Tags: corns   calluses   bunions   flat feet   Diabetes   Hammertoes  

There are many causes for foot problems. One of the most serious, however, is diabetes. Today, there are approximately 100 million Americans with diabetes. World estimates run to 371 million with 187 that don’t know they do. Diabetes is a condition where there is too much blood glucose or blood sugar in your body. In order for our bodies to work properly, the glucose must get into our cells providing much needed energy. To help do so, insulin must be taken. Feet then need special care.

Too much glucose can damage our eyes, kidneys and nerves. Diabetes can cause strokes, heart disease and the need to surgically remove limbs, so it is important to take your insulin on a regular basis.

Risk factors for diabetes include:

  • High blood pressure. High blood pressure can damage your body’s ability to pump blood.
  • Obesity. Being overweight which many people are.
  • Family history. If your brothers, sisters or parent has type 2 diabetes.
  • Age. If you are 45 years old or older.
  • Lack of Exercise. Being active less than 3 days per week.

Foot problems associated with diabetes:

  • Corns. Increased layers of skin on your foot on the small toes or outside of the foot.
  • Calluses. Thickened skin between toes or at the widest part of your foot.
  • Bunions. Deformity of the big toe joint.
  • Flat feet. The lack of an arch in your foot.
  • Hammertoes. Deformity of the toes where they bend in at the middle joint.

Early signs of diabetes include:

  • Urination. An increased need to urinate.
  • Increased thirst. A constant desire to drink liquids.
  • Increased appetite. Constant hunger.
  • Exhaustion. Feeling unduly tired.
  • Vision problems. Blurred vision and difficulty seeing.
  • Weight loss. Losing weight unexpectedly.
  • Wounds. Cuts or bruises slow to heal.
  • Numbness. Peripheral neuropathy is a numb or tingling sensations in your limbs or feet

If you believe you may have diabetes or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
March 05, 2019
Category: Plantar Fasciitis

With today’s push for more and more healthy lifestyles, many people are turning to physical activity to do so. Some of this includes running or jogging which is a great way to lose weight or just keep in shape. With this, though, can come foot pain caused by a condition known as Plantar Fasciitis.

Plantar Fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes.  Most likely you will immediately feel a stabbing pain in your foot as soon as you wake. The pain may improve during the day, but most likely will return after standing for long periods of time or rising suddenly from a seated position.

Risk Factors for Plantar Fasciitis include:

  • Age - Common between the ages of 40 and 60.
  • Exercise - Activities that place a lot of stress on your heel - long-distance running, jumping activities, ballet and aerobic dance.
  • Foot mechanics - Having flat-feet, a high arch or an abnormal pattern of walking affecting weight distribution.
  • Obesity - Excessive weight.
  • Occupation - Factory workers, teachers, construction workers, nurses and others who spend a lot of time hours walking or standing on hard surfaces.

Ignoring Plantar Fasciitis symptoms can cause further foot, knee, hip or back problems so seeing a podiatrist is crucial. Treatments include:

  • Examination - Physical examination of the inflamed site.
  • X-Ray or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - To check damaged nerve or fracture.
  • Medicine- Doctor prescribed pain meds.
  • Stretching - Simple foot stretches to help alleviate the pain.
  • Therapy - including Physical therapy, Night Splints and the use of orthotics.
  • Surgery - at times this may be the last resort if the pain is not subsiding.

If you believe you run the risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis then you will want to start losing weight, always wear good running shoes, choose footwear that is supportive, has good arch support and absorbs shock well. Such common-sense approaches may just keep your feet pain free and you better able to improve your overall health.

If you have any issues or notice pain while trying any exercise, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments to get you back to being active. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
September 26, 2018
Category: Running

Whether it’s to fundraise for a good cause or to challenge yourself with a new activity, running (or walking) a 5K race can be a lot of fun! This is especially true if you join in with friends or family as you cross the finish line.

While 5Ks and other running events are healthy physical activities, they come with risks if you are not careful. The following are tips on how to get started with preparing for a 5K (or longer) running event:

  • Start slow. If you are not a runner, running a 5K without any preparation can be an exhausting activity. Walk or slowly jog the distance you’re training for to see how far it really is. Do not overdo it on the first go, as you might be left with blisters, painful shin splints, and/or shortness of breath. Doing too much too quickly can also lead to chronic Achilles tendonitis or other overuse injuries.
  • Build up endurance and speed. Again, start slow and practice running the 5K (or longer) distance. The more practice you get, the easier it will be on your body when it comes to actually running the race. Start with shorter distances and then make them longer as you train. Then, you might want to practice running the distance at a faster pace. (Hint: use music to help you stay at a steady pace)
  • Wear the right shoes. Are your feet sore or tired after your practice runs? It might mean that you are not wearing the right shoes. Make sure they fit you correctly, have ample cushioning on the inner sole, and are not wearing down on the outer sole. The extra cushion will reduce the impact on your joints!
  • Use orthotics. If your feet have a specific shape, such as flat feet, you may want to use orthotic inserts to get more support.
  • Rest, stretch, and hydrate. Be sure to rest enough so that your feet and ankles do not become injured with overuse injuries. Don’t forget to stretch and hydrate before and after each training as well!

Running a 5K without preparing for it can lead to injuries, so it’s important to start with the above tips. If you have pain from running, come to see us at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified foot doctor, Dr. Brad Toll. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505