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Posts for tag: flat feet

By Crofton Podiatry
September 26, 2018
Category: Running

Whether it’s to fundraise for a good cause or to challenge yourself with a new activity, running (or walking) a 5K race can be a lot of fun! This is especially true if you join in with friends or family as you cross the finish line.

While 5Ks and other running events are healthy physical activities, they come with risks if you are not careful. The following are tips on how to get started with preparing for a 5K (or longer) running event:

  • Start slow. If you are not a runner, running a 5K without any preparation can be an exhausting activity. Walk or slowly jog the distance you’re training for to see how far it really is. Do not overdo it on the first go, as you might be left with blisters, painful shin splints, and/or shortness of breath. Doing too much too quickly can also lead to chronic Achilles tendonitis or other overuse injuries.
  • Build up endurance and speed. Again, start slow and practice running the 5K (or longer) distance. The more practice you get, the easier it will be on your body when it comes to actually running the race. Start with shorter distances and then make them longer as you train. Then, you might want to practice running the distance at a faster pace. (Hint: use music to help you stay at a steady pace)
  • Wear the right shoes. Are your feet sore or tired after your practice runs? It might mean that you are not wearing the right shoes. Make sure they fit you correctly, have ample cushioning on the inner sole, and are not wearing down on the outer sole. The extra cushion will reduce the impact on your joints!
  • Use orthotics. If your feet have a specific shape, such as flat feet, you may want to use orthotic inserts to get more support.
  • Rest, stretch, and hydrate. Be sure to rest enough so that your feet and ankles do not become injured with overuse injuries. Don’t forget to stretch and hydrate before and after each training as well!

Running a 5K without preparing for it can lead to injuries, so it’s important to start with the above tips. If you have pain from running, come to see us at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified foot doctor, Dr. Brad Toll. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 25, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear

Depending on the type of work you do, you may be required to wear specific types of shoes. Construction workers might need to wear heavy-duty boots, while nurses need to wear safety shoes to protect themselves from needles and other hazards. And while safety comes first, does that mean you should sacrifice on foot comfort and health?

While most work shoes do have some level of comfort and support built in, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s enough for your feet. This is especially true when your work shoes begin to wear down. 

The following are tips for making sure that your work shoes are working for YOU:

  • Make sure you have enough arch and heel support. This will prevent painful symptoms for people who have flat feet or tend to overpronate. Good heel cups help you keep your feet stable so that the Achilles’ tendon does not have to become strained.
  • Check the level of cushioning. Press down on the inner soles of the shoes every now and then to make sure that you still have cushioning to absorb impact to the bones and joints in the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.
  • Buy anti-slip outer soles. Work shoes should have adequate tread to make sure that you are not at high risk for slipping on clean floors or on wet, slick surfaces. 
  • Get measured each time you buy work shoes. The best time to buy shoes, especially work shoes (which you will spend 35+ hours wearing each week), is in the afternoon, when your feet are a bit swollen from walking or standing during the day. 
  • Avoid shoes that make your feet feel cramped. Shoes with tight toe boxes do not always “break in”. Scrunching your feet into shoes that feel cramped are more likely to leave you with worse symptoms of bunions, blisters, or hammertoes.
  • Look for signs of wearing out or breaking down. If they look or feel like they are worn down, they probably are. If the insole or outer sole is very much reduced from when you first bought the work shoes, it’s a sign that your shoes are not working for you. Additionally, if there are cuts, scrapes, or broken parts of the shoes, it’s definitely time to replace the shoes.
  • Replace shoes approximately every 6 months. Typically, work shoes can go about 3-500 miles before they need to be replaced. Be good to your feet and replace them instead of trying to wear shoes until they are no longer usable.

For some of you, work shoes might mean high heels or flats. The same tips above apply, but the safety features might not be built in.

Everyone who wears work shoes that are not quite fitting properly or comfortably, you may benefit from using orthotic inserts. For those with specific shoe needs, our podiatrist can help you with custom orthotics. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your working feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment or orthotic device. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 18, 2018
Category: Children's Feet

Did you know that children’s bones do not fully develop until the ages of 18 to 25? That’s why it’s so important to make sure that when your child incurs an injury, a doctor looks it over. This is especially true when the injury involves the feet or ankles since there are 26 bones that can be affected on each side.

A condition that commonly affects growing children’s growing bones is Sever’s Disease. Also known as Calcaneal Apophysitis, the growth plate in the back of the heel bone has inflammation or swelling, causing pain to your child. Overuse, repeated impact, or blunt injury to the heel bone can cause pain in the back of the foot, making it painful to stand or walk.

Who is usually affected?

The causes of foot pain described above are typical for children and teens that play sports. Those who jump and run repeatedly during practice and games tend to be the ones who suffer from Sever’s Disease. Football, basketball, and long jump athletes tend to experience this type of heel pain. Additionally, children who are obese or have conditions like flat feet are also at higher risk of developing heel pain from the repeated strain on the Achilles tendon.

How can my child feel better?

As soon as your child complains of heel pain, check for symptoms like inflammation or swelling, redness, and tenderness. Pain when squeezing the sides of the heel bone will also indicate a likelihood of Sever’s Disease. For a proper diagnosis, it’s best to make an appointment to see our podiatrist. Additionally, the following treatments might help:

  • RICE method (at home): Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation will help relieve symptoms and reduce pain. Your child should stay off the affected foot (feet) to avoid further aggravation.
  • Orthotic inserts (over-the-counter): You can try to buy some heel inserts to see if supporting and cushioning the heel helps to relieve painful symptoms.
  • Physical Therapy (podiatrist-prescribed): When you see our podiatrist, he might recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles to better support the heel. Stretching can help relieve symptoms and promote healing.
  • Immobilization (podiatrist-prescribed): If the condition is severe, our podiatrist might recommend a cast or custom orthotic device to prevent your child from experiencing worse symptoms.

If your child complains of foot pain, it’s never a good sign. Make an appointment promptly by calling Crofton Podiatry in Maryland at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your children’s feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
February 28, 2018
Category: Gait analysis
Tags: flat feet   walk   ankle roll   inward  

Did you know that there is a right way and a wrong way to walk? It might not be something you’ve ever really thought about or evaluated, but that just means the time is now. That’s because if you happen to have abnormalities with your gait (the way you walk), it can be the cause of your foot or ankle problem.

What could I be doing wrong?

After you read this post, check in with your feet and ankles. Take a walk across the room to see if you might be doing some of the following:

  • Does any part of your foot hurt when taking steps? Maybe the balls of your feet or your heels?
  • Are you leaning your foot more to the outside or inside?
  • Are your toes pointed slightly outward, instead of forward?
  • Have you been stomping, without realizing?
  • Are all parts of your feet touching the ground at the same time?

How should I walk?

Look at the following aspects of your walking habits to see where you might be able to make some corrections.

  • Foot strike: The way that each foot hits the ground should go as follows: heel > outside of the foot > ball of the foot > toes (as the heel comes off the ground). As the toes roll off, the heel of the other foot should be striking the ground, and continuing with the rest of the foot as described above.
  • Foot direction: Next, pay attention to the shape of your feet as you walk. The feet should be walking on parallel tracks, not making zigzags or a V shape. If the toes point inward or outward, it can cause strain on the feet to help you stabilize.
  • Ankle roll: Ideally, your ankles should be stacked in a line, between the heel bone and the knees. However, some may find their ankles to roll inward (overpronation) or outward (under pronation). This can cause ankle pain over time, especially if you have flat feet.

Next time you have a chance, check your gait to see if you should “walk this way.”  If you a self-evaluation on your gait is difficult, you may want to have our podiatrist help you. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can help you with an assessment and treatment if needed. Come visit our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
January 16, 2018
Category: Footwear

What does a nurse, line cook, hairdresser, and a member of the Queen’s Guard at Buckingham Palace all have in common? The answer: they stand for the majority (if not all) of their time at work. While standing still or simply walking around doesn’t seem too difficult, it’s more challenging than you think. It’s especially tough on the feet and ankles, as they do not get enough rest to recover throughout the day.

People who stand all day at work tend to have more issues with their legs, feet, and back, especially if they do not maintain a good posture all day (and let’s be honest, who is able to maintain proper posture the WHOLE time – with the exception of the Queen’s guard?). The surfaces are usually hard, so unless you have supportive, cushioned shoes, as well as a cushioned standing mat, your body can feel much more fatigued than the average office desk employee.

So what kind of shoes can help you if you have to stand all day? Consider the following footwear factors when buying your work shoes:

  • Cushion – Look for shoes with more cushion on the insoles than regular shoes. If you have to, add orthotic inserts to give you even more cushioning.
  • Fit – Shoes should fit well. They shouldn’t be too small, narrow, or tight as that can cause problems like hammertoes, bunions, or corns. They shouldn’t be too big either, as your feet will have to strain to stabilize you, causing overuse problems like plantar fasciitis.
  • Support – If you have flat feet or fallen arches, you’ll want to make sure you have good arch support. Otherwise, you may be standing or walking in an overpronated position all day, straining other parts of the feet like your Achilles tendon (causing Achilles tendonitis).
  • Material/Protection – Depending on your worksite, try to choose shoes that are breathable so that they do not get overheated and sweaty, which could lead to foot odor and fungal or bacterial growth. However, if you will be at risk of injury from heavy or sharp falling objects, adhere to the work site’s dress code for shoes and add orthotic inserts as needed. You may also want to change your socks mid-shift if you tend to sweat a lot (like with hyperhidrosis). 

Take breaks when you can, and try to elevate your feet if you are prone to swelling. When you get home, take a warm foot soak and get a foot massage to find relief and rejuvenate your feet for the next workday!

Do you have overuse injuries or pain from your work shoes? Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry to get an assessment for the right treatment. Make an appointment at our office in Crofton, MD by calling (410) 721-4505. Our office also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505