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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

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If you’ve been a runner for a while, you know how much your feet endure when you hit the pavement. A long run or even a quick sprint can leave your feet throbbing, aching, or in pain. Long-term, you might suffer from foot problems such as chronic plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.

Still, you can’t beat that runner’s high, right? If you can’t seem to resist that daily run, here are Top 5 Tips you can use to take care of your Runners’ Feet:

  1. Start slowly and increase slowly. Beginners should start with a slow pace and a short distance and increase as experience grows. If you increase speed or incline too much, too quickly, you can end up straining the tendons and ligaments in your feet and ankles.
  2. Use the right shoes. Running shoes should be supportive and have adequate cushioning to reduce the impact on the bones and joints. Repetitive pounding on the hard surfaces can lead to weakened bones that are prone to fractures. Arches and heel cups will keep the feet stable in the shoes. If you have existing foot problems, you can use orthotic inserts to prevent worsening symptoms. 
  3. Don’t skimp on socks. Wearing shoes without socks can lead to irritation and blisters on the skin of the feet. Sweaty feet can make the shoes smelly, and increase the chances of bacterial or fungal infection like Athlete’s foot. Always wear a clean, fresh pair of socks for running to reduce the likelihood of foot issues.
  4. Stretch the toes, feet, ankles, and calves. Always warm up and cool down, including stretching of the lower extremities. Strengthening the toes can help to reduce chances of toe deformities and help you stabilize your feet in the shoes.
  5. Practice good foot hygiene. After a good sweaty running session, you’ll want to make sure to wash your feet (probably while you shower) with soap and warm water and then change into a new pair of socks. If you run every day, you may want to invest in more than one pair of shoes so that you can allow them to dry out completely between running sessions. Keep toenails short and take care of any ingrown toenails or fungal toenails. Additionally, any cuts and scrapes can become more inflamed while running, so be sure to treat them promptly.

If you’ve sustained an injury while running, or if you have concerns with whether or not your feet are in shape for running, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

In the summer – our shoe selection is plentiful.  With everything from sandals on the beach to high heels for high fashion, our feet get a variety of cover during the warmer seasons.  Since the winter chill has rolled in to Maryland, cities like Crofton, Bowie, Annapolis, Odenton, and Gambrills have already reached into the back of their closets for that one trusty pair of boots to forge through the frozen months.  While these boots are great for slushing through the winter precipitation they are prone to moisture from the melting snow on the outside, and the perspiring feet bundled within layers of wool socks on the inside. 

Repeated exposure to an environment with high moisture like the inside of our boots results in skin breakdown.  The same effect happens when you leave your hands in water for too long.  When combined with the rubbing forces from walking, your moistened skin becomes vulnerable to flaking, cracking and tearing; the latter providing an easy route for infection.  This is exactly how the infamous Tinea Pedis (or Athlete’s Foot) we typically experience during the summer occurs. In regards to treating this dry, damaged skin generic moisturizers or petroleum-based jellies simply won’t cut it most of the time. 

The following are a list of clues you may be experiencing winter athlete’s foot:

1.      Intense itching and/or burning sensation in the feet.

2.      Red, or dry patches of skin.  Sometimes it may just look like dry skin.

3.      Cracked, blistering, or peeling skin.  (Make sure to check in between your toes as well.)

4.      Cloudy, yellow, or unusually thick nails.

If you feel like you are experiencing any of the above symptoms, I highly encourage you to make an appointment to come see me for prompt inspection.  Dry, peeling, or itching skin could be a case of ‘Winter tinea’, or signs of something more sinister.  A brief examination from my trained staff and myself at Crofton Podiatry would allow us to answer any of your questions and get you moving forward with the right treatment.  Don’t be a victim to your feet any longer!

By Brad Toll




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505