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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

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By Crofton Podiatry
April 01, 2019
Category: Shin Splints
Tags: podiatrist   flat feet   footwear   stretch   shin splint   insoles  

With warmer weather on its way, Spring promises to provide more and more opportunities for outdoor activities. Basketball, running, tennis and other sports all require the constant pounding of feet against the ground, and with this, can follow something called a shin splint. What is a shin splint? Defined as a common foot-related injury, shin splints, also known as tibial stress syndrome, is caused when stress on your shinbone and the connective tissues that attach your muscles to your bones become inflamed and painful, making running or even walking very difficult.

Causes of Shin Splints:

  • Flat feet – The lack of an arch to absorb shock every time the foot hits the ground.
  • Poor fitting footwear – footwear must fit your feet and provide overall support, especially for hi-impact sports or activities.
  • Failing to stretch before activities - It is very important to stretch the foot and leg muscles before any activity to loosen them and get the blood circulating.
  • Weak ankles, hips and core muscles – as the body works in unison, each works in tandem to help the foot better absorb shock.

How to Treat Shin Splints:

  • Rest – if injured, take time off from your activity giving your body time to heal.
  • Ice – putting ice on the affected area will reduce pain and inflammation. It is recommended you do this for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 to 3 days or until it is better.
  • Insoles – wear store bought or custom insoles or inserts that strengthen your arch.
  • Anti-inflammatory medicine – ibuprofen or other medicine. Be especially careful to use only as directed. Your podiatrist would be the best source of information.
  • Surface choice – if you’re a runner who likes to run on hard pavement, consider finding a softer surface like an artificial track often found at high schools or other public areas.
  • Medical exam – see your podiatrist to make sure you do not have any other related injury.

If you believe you are prone to or already have shin splints or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2019
Category: skin conditions
Tags: corns   Diabetes   footwear   callus   skin   plantar wart  

What may appear to be minor problems on your feet can easily turn into more serious situations. This is why it you suspect you are developing a callus or corn you will want to check with a podiatrist.

What is a callus? A callus is a thickening of the skin due to friction or undue stress. Calluses usually occur in between toes, on the ball or heel or on the sides of your feet and vary in shape. Corns are another type of skin thickening, but can be much more painful. A corn has a much harder center and occur on weight bearing and non-weight bearing parts of the foot. Both develop to protect skin below the affected area.

Causes include:

  • Poor fitting shoes. Footwear that does not cushion your feet.
  • Diabetes. Diabetes inhibits good circulation.
  • Lack of socks. Not wearing socks can cause friction between the foot and shoes. Poor fitting socks can do the same.

Symptoms for Calluses and Corns include:

  • A thick area of skin.
  • A hardened and raised bump on your foot.
  • Tenderness under your skin.
  • The development of flaky skin.

Corns and calluses are sometimes misidentified as a plantar wart. Plantar warts have small black dots in them and are painful if squeezed from the side. Corns and calluses are painful when pressure is applied on top.

If you choose to treat the calluses yourself, try soaking them in warm water then gently rubbing them with a wetted pumice stone in a circular motion, but do not take off too much skin. Applying lotion afterward and use specific padding to keep them away from the sides of your shoes. Calluses or corns could take up to 4 weeks to go away. The best way to deal with them, however, is by seeing your podiatrist. This is especially important if they are caused by diabetes, an abnormal foot structure, walking motion or hip rotation.

If you believe you may have a corn or callus or have any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Brad Toll
November 22, 2014
Category: Footwear

Recently Hollywood and the fashion industry has been abuzz with word of the latest fashion crime to appear on celebrities feet; the shower sandal. Made famous by the now infamous Adidas sandals that made their way into most people’s closets as a way to protect feet from locker-room floors over a decade ago, these nostalgic sandals are now making a big comeback in what’s being termed the ‘ugly-pretty’ market. Recently, high fashion shoe wear designers such as Celine and Chloe have revealed versions costing triple digits for the now infamous loungewear, which making its way into numerous celeb Instagrams and even a few red carpets (both with and without socks as well).

While it is our hope that this fad doesn’t make its way anywhere near the Annapolis and Crofton areas of Maryland, this does provide an excellent reminder of when old shoes (and even old styles such as shower sandals) should probably be thrown away and replaced. Old and worn shoes may aid to the development of overuse injuries, particularly those like stress fractures or tendinitis. These can be very painful conditions and may significantly set back your mobility and summer exercise routines, however, they are easily prevented by regular and proactive replacement of your shoe gear.

Many of my patients ask me how they should know when it is time to replace their summer running shoes.  For active runners, the golden rule I tell all my patients at Crofton Podiatry is to replace your shoes around every 500 miles or earlier if you begin feeling pain in your feet, ankles, or knees with wear. For non-strictly running activities such as CrossFit, replacing your athletic shoes at least every 12 months should be adequate depending on how hard you train.

If you’re unsure about the age or use of your shoes, the easiest way to determine their remaining longevity is by looking at the sole of each shoe. Shoes that are near the end of their life will show significant wear in the tread, perhaps even to the point where the bottom of the shoe is no longer flat. If you see any of these signs, or are still unsure on how the wear on your shoes may be affecting your health, it is important you see a knowledgeable shoe specialist to evaluate if your shoes are best for you and your health.

By Brad Toll.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505