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By Crofton Podiatry
November 19, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: high heels   yoga   pedicure   nutritious food  

When you think about what you’re thankful for, you might list things like health, family, friends, a job, your dog, etc., etc. But have you thought about focusing your gratitude on your feet?

Sure, that sounds silly or weird, but let’s STEP BACK, and think about it.

Why would you thank your feet?

  • They take you where you want to go.
  • They stabilize you when you stand, ride a skateboard, or do yoga.
  • They help you reach those things that are high up.
  • They work hard to keep you active and healthy.
  • They allow you to operate certain machines like cars or sewing machines.
  • They give you tools of defense (if you learn how to kick properly!).

You use your feet every single day without a single thought. They just work and go and do. So in appreciation of your hard-working feet, why not try some of these ways to THANK your feet during this season of giving thanks:

  • T-Treat your feet to a safe and clean pedicure!
  • H-Help yourself to nutritious foods with calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidants!
  • A-Apply moisturizer when your feet get dry, especially as it gets colder.
  • N-Note any foot pain or changes and make an appointment to get treatment.
  • K-Kick back and relax – a partner massage or a foot massager machine.
  • S-Soak your feet in a warm bath - with Epsom salt and essential oils.

Additionally, you might want to replace some of your older shoes with newer, more comfortable shoes with supportive features. If you must wear high heels or tight shoes, bring comfortable shoes to change into as soon as you can. While you’re at it, get yourself some standing mats for in front of the sinks, stoves, and desks of your home. Wherever you stand for long periods of time, that’s where your feet will be happy to have some cushioning.

As you do your holiday shopping, travel, and spend time with loved ones, don’t forget to give your feet some TLC. The best thing you can do is to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry if you notice anything wrong with your feet. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Dr. Toll and his foot care team are dedicated to your foot health. Visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 30, 2018
Category: Feet Safety

What do you usually like to do on Halloween? Trick or Treat with family? Party with friends? Visit a Haunted House? Whatever your plans are, in order to have a fun night on the town, make sure that you take precautions to stay safe! You’ll want to pay a little extra attention to keeping your feet safe since you’ll probably be on them the whole time.

Here are a few tips and tricks for a safe and happy Halloween night!

  • Make sure to wear comfortable and supportive shoes, with socks! The weather has gotten pretty cold, so stick to closed-toed shoes. You don’t want to come back to numb or frozen toes! If your shoes need to be part of your costume, find creative ways to dress up your shoes or cover them. 
  • Avoid high heels. Sure, an alluring costume might call for a great pair of stilettos or knee-high boots, but there are plenty of fashionable shoes available that do not have heels that are higher than 2 inches. It would be a bummer to have to end the night early because your feet are aching.
  • Does your costume involve a long garment or dress? Be sure that it’s not so long that you’ll trip over it. 
  • Plan out a safe route, avoiding dimly lit areas. If you can’t see where you’re going, you might trip on some debris, the curb, or uneven sidewalks. You might end up with a twisted or sprained ankle.
  • If possible, incorporate some reflective tape into your costume or the back of your shoes. Be careful of bikes or cars speeding by – especially since electric and hybrid cars have become so silent lately.

If you have noticed that a particular part of your feet are tired, even though you didn’t wear high heels or narrow shoes, you may need extra special support for your feet. Our podiatrist can assess your orthotic needs.

Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, who can properly assess your foot or ankle problems. Make an appointment today at Crofton Podiatry by calling (410) 721-4505. Dr. Toll and his staff are ready to improve your foot health at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 11, 2018
Category: Bunion
Tags: high heels   flats   shoes   surgery   orthotic  

While the wrong types of shoes may not directly cause bunions, they can be the reason why they become worse. Long-term use of shoes that do not have the proper foot support can lead the bunion becoming larger, stiffer, and more painful.

So what actually causes bunions?

While the exact cause is unknown, it seems that genetics, injuries to the big toe joint, and excessive pressure to the forefoot causes the big toe to begin pointing toward the other toes. The bony spur develops as a response to direct pressure, improper healing, or as a support to the big toe joint.

Then what types of shoes make bunion symptoms worse?

  • High heels (higher than 2 inches) – Wearing high heels puts an extraneous strain on the forefoot, especially at the big toe joint. The extra pressure can cause inflammation and pain after even just a few minutes. Eventually, it can cause the bony spur to get bigger and more painful.
  • Narrow and/or pointed-toe shoes – While some shoes seem very fashionable and trendy by being pointy or narrow, it’s not actually the right shape for your feet. Forcing your feet to spend the day walking in narrow or pointy shoes can further force your big toe to point toward your other toes.
  • Tight shoes or shoes that are small for you - Don’t forget that your feet swell a little bit throughout the day, so it’s best to find shoes that fit you in the afternoon. Additionally, some shoes do not come in half sizes, so you may have to size up or down. Be careful with sizing down since your feet (and bunions) need space to feel comfortable.
  • Stiff, non-adjustable shoes – Shoes with elastic material, straps, or laces will allow you to adjust your shoes to comfort as the day goes on. Again, tight shoes will only make bunion symptoms worse! If your bunion becomes inflamed, you’ll want to give your feet some breathing room by adjusting them.
  • Flats – Ballerina flats and other flat shoes that do not have arch support can cause more pressure on the big toe joint. If you prefer to wear flats, try adding arch support inserts to feel more comfortable.

What is the lesson learned? If you have bunions, don’t make them worse with the wrong shoes. Try looking for footwear that is low-heeled, comfortable, roomy for your toes, supportive for your arches, and adjustable throughout the day.

Of course, those with severe bunions already should speak with our podiatrist for the best solution. You may need custom orthotic shoes to fit severely deformed feet. Surgery might even be necessary if bunions really get in the way of your life.

We can help you! Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Come to visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 25, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear

Depending on the type of work you do, you may be required to wear specific types of shoes. Construction workers might need to wear heavy-duty boots, while nurses need to wear safety shoes to protect themselves from needles and other hazards. And while safety comes first, does that mean you should sacrifice on foot comfort and health?

While most work shoes do have some level of comfort and support built in, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s enough for your feet. This is especially true when your work shoes begin to wear down. 

The following are tips for making sure that your work shoes are working for YOU:

  • Make sure you have enough arch and heel support. This will prevent painful symptoms for people who have flat feet or tend to overpronate. Good heel cups help you keep your feet stable so that the Achilles’ tendon does not have to become strained.
  • Check the level of cushioning. Press down on the inner soles of the shoes every now and then to make sure that you still have cushioning to absorb impact to the bones and joints in the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.
  • Buy anti-slip outer soles. Work shoes should have adequate tread to make sure that you are not at high risk for slipping on clean floors or on wet, slick surfaces. 
  • Get measured each time you buy work shoes. The best time to buy shoes, especially work shoes (which you will spend 35+ hours wearing each week), is in the afternoon, when your feet are a bit swollen from walking or standing during the day. 
  • Avoid shoes that make your feet feel cramped. Shoes with tight toe boxes do not always “break in”. Scrunching your feet into shoes that feel cramped are more likely to leave you with worse symptoms of bunions, blisters, or hammertoes.
  • Look for signs of wearing out or breaking down. If they look or feel like they are worn down, they probably are. If the insole or outer sole is very much reduced from when you first bought the work shoes, it’s a sign that your shoes are not working for you. Additionally, if there are cuts, scrapes, or broken parts of the shoes, it’s definitely time to replace the shoes.
  • Replace shoes approximately every 6 months. Typically, work shoes can go about 3-500 miles before they need to be replaced. Be good to your feet and replace them instead of trying to wear shoes until they are no longer usable.

For some of you, work shoes might mean high heels or flats. The same tips above apply, but the safety features might not be built in.

Everyone who wears work shoes that are not quite fitting properly or comfortably, you may benefit from using orthotic inserts. For those with specific shoe needs, our podiatrist can help you with custom orthotics. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your working feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment or orthotic device. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
February 21, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear

There are certain habits that are picked up without realizing it. Picking at scabs, shaking your legs while sitting, saying “like,” and not signaling when you change lanes in your car are all bad habits that you might pick up without consciously trying to do them.

Likewise, there may be some bad habits that you may have picked up regarding your shoes. The following are unconscious actions you might be doing that could be harming your shoe (and therefore your foot and ankle health):

  • Wearing the same shoes each day – If you have a pair of shoes that you wear each day, such as work shoes or walking shoes, there’s a good chance that you’ve developed at least a little bit of a funky smell in them. That’s because bacteria and mold love to grow in moist and warm places, such as in your footwear. As you sweat throughout the day, the microorganisms thrive and can survive long after you’ve taken them off. To help reduce odor and even breakdown of the shoes, rotate the shoes you wear each day. You may even need to buy two of the same pair of shoes if you really need to wear those particular ones. 
  • Putting them away as soon as you get home – This can perpetuate the above mentioned bacterial and fungal growth in the shoes, as they don’t get a chance to air out and dry out. Get in the habit of leaving them out overnight and putting shoes away before you leave for work in the morning. Or better yet, leave them out until you get back after work later that day.
  • Not wearing socks with shoes – Some people get into this habit out of convenience or the idea that certain shoes do not need socks. However, any enclosed shoes would benefit from socks as a barrier between the inner lining and your feet. Socks can absorb the moisture that would otherwise go into your shoes; they also protect the inner lining of the shoes from features of your feet, such as long toenails. TIP: If you’ve got hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), change your socks at least once midday.
  • Folding the back of the shoes – When you’re just running out to grab something from the car or get the mail, you might just slip your feet into shoes and fold the back like a slipper. It makes easier to get in and out of the shoes. However, not only are you breaking the structure of the shoe, you’re also wearing down the rubber soles of your shoes since it’s more likely to be dragging on the ground. Proper heel cupping in the shoes is important to preventing some overuse injuries like plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Dragging your feet when you walk – Some of you might be more inclined to drag your feet when wearing certain shoes like fur-lined boots or certain sandals. That could really wear down the outer soles of the shoes, causing problems with the structural integrity and support your feet and ankles get. Pay attention to your gait.
  • You wear high heels, flats, or other uncomfortable shoes every day – You may have become a pro at wearing certain shoes each day, but high heels, flats, and pointed-toe shoes can all end up causing you problems. They all lack supportive features and make your feet work harder than they need to. If you MUST wear these uncomfortable shoes, at least try to change out of them as soon as you leave the office since you may develop bunions or metatarsalgia otherwise.
  • Wearing shoes too long – This is not a habit, per say, but something you’ve been resisting. You may have a favorite pair of shoes that you want to wear until you can’t, but it could leave you with more pain than joy. If you really want to extend the life of your shoes, consider wearing them with orthotic inserts to maintain support for your feet.

Do you think you might have foot or ankle problems because of bad shoe habits? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can help you with an assessment and treatment if needed. For dedicated care for your feet and ankles, visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505