(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: ingrown toenails

By Crofton Podiatry
January 23, 2019
Category: Fungal toenails

Fungal problems are more common than you think. They can affect many parts of the body, from the tops of your heads to the bottoms of your feet. For the feet, in particular, the most common issues affect the skin and the toenails. In fact, one infection (toenail fungus) can start from another (Athlete’s foot).

Where would you get this fungal infection on your feet?

Some places where you might have picked up the infection include the gym locker room, sharing a towel with someone who has a fungal infection or from the tools at the last pedicure you received. 

Fungus thrives in moist and warm environments. So moisture + a break in the skin of a warm foot = fungal infection. It passes from person to person, foot to foot, and toenail to toenail pretty easily. Once your toenails are infected, they are likely to become discolored, thick, brittle, and develop a smell.

So what can you do to prevent a stubborn fungal toenail infection?

  • Practice good hygiene. Wash every day with soap and warm water to reduce the risk of developing an infection.
  • Do not walk around barefoot in a gym locker room. Wear flip-flops or sandals, especially if you’re using a communal shower.
  • If you are prone to sweating a lot due to hyperhidrosis, bring a pair of socks to change into when your socks have soaked through.
  • You can also use antifungal or foot powder in your socks or shoes to reduce moisture in the shoes. 
  • Do not share nail grooming tools with someone who is infected (or at least be very diligent about disinfecting).
  • Cut your toenails properly. Ingrown toenails can cause breaks in the skin that make you more prone to a fungal infection.
  • Go to a reputable salon for a pedicure. Make sure that you can see how they sterilize their tools. Otherwise, schedule your pedicure for their first appointment of the day to ensure that they are starting the day with freshly cleaned tools on you.
  • If you have Athlete’s foot or other fungal infection on your hands, be sure to clean your hands often before touching your toes. Treat your Athlete’s foot condition promptly to prevent spreading.
  • You may have to stop using nail polish altogether as your toenails will have a harder time recovering from a fungal infection when it cannot breathe (due to polished nails).

These prevention measures should lower the risk of having to deal with fungal toenails. However, if you do somehow get infected, our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, can help you treat the condition with topical or oral medication or painless laser therapy! Request an appointment by calling Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

Did you know that a burning desire to serve your country is not enough to join the military? There are many obstacles that can stop you from joining the military. Good physical and mental health, as well as a high school level of education, are necessary starting points to being able to enlist.

Among the many qualifications needed to join the military are those related to your physical health. You wouldn’t be surprised, then, that your feet need to be in tip-top shape to be able to perform your military duties.

There are many foot conditions that can keep you from serving, including:

  • Unhealed fractures at the time of applying. Even if they will heal soon, you need to be able to perform all functions before you can officially enlist.
  • Implanted orthopedic devices (such as titanium plates) that align bones. If you’ve broken a bone or had orthopedic problems that require a permanent fixture, you are likely unable to enlist.
  • Any joint replacement. This includes the big toe joint, due to arthritis.
  • Any deformity or condition that interferes with walking, marching, running or jumping, OR that interferes with wearing military footwear. These can include toe deformities (like hammertoes), uncorrected clubfoot, and neuromas.
  • Flat feet that need prescription shoes or orthotics. This would mean that you cannot use standard military footwear.
  • Chronic plantar fasciitis. Chronic pain while bearing weight on the feet will disqualify you from military service.
  • Severely ingrown toenails. If they are infected or causing you pain at the time of enlisting, they will disqualify you.
  • Any other injuries or conditions that will prevent them from passing the medical tests.

Some of these issues are treatable, so it’s best to see our podiatrist right away if you are thinking of enlisting. Make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll to help you find treatment for your foot conditions. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505 today! We provide services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

If you’ve been a runner for a while, you know how much your feet endure when you hit the pavement. A long run or even a quick sprint can leave your feet throbbing, aching, or in pain. Long-term, you might suffer from foot problems such as chronic plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.

Still, you can’t beat that runner’s high, right? If you can’t seem to resist that daily run, here are Top 5 Tips you can use to take care of your Runners’ Feet:

  1. Start slowly and increase slowly. Beginners should start with a slow pace and a short distance and increase as experience grows. If you increase speed or incline too much, too quickly, you can end up straining the tendons and ligaments in your feet and ankles.
  2. Use the right shoes. Running shoes should be supportive and have adequate cushioning to reduce the impact on the bones and joints. Repetitive pounding on the hard surfaces can lead to weakened bones that are prone to fractures. Arches and heel cups will keep the feet stable in the shoes. If you have existing foot problems, you can use orthotic inserts to prevent worsening symptoms. 
  3. Don’t skimp on socks. Wearing shoes without socks can lead to irritation and blisters on the skin of the feet. Sweaty feet can make the shoes smelly, and increase the chances of bacterial or fungal infection like Athlete’s foot. Always wear a clean, fresh pair of socks for running to reduce the likelihood of foot issues.
  4. Stretch the toes, feet, ankles, and calves. Always warm up and cool down, including stretching of the lower extremities. Strengthening the toes can help to reduce chances of toe deformities and help you stabilize your feet in the shoes.
  5. Practice good foot hygiene. After a good sweaty running session, you’ll want to make sure to wash your feet (probably while you shower) with soap and warm water and then change into a new pair of socks. If you run every day, you may want to invest in more than one pair of shoes so that you can allow them to dry out completely between running sessions. Keep toenails short and take care of any ingrown toenails or fungal toenails. Additionally, any cuts and scrapes can become more inflamed while running, so be sure to treat them promptly.

If you’ve sustained an injury while running, or if you have concerns with whether or not your feet are in shape for running, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 24, 2018
Category: Fungal toenails

Onychomycosis, more commonly known as fungal toenails, is a contagious fungal infection. This means that you can get the tinea fungus, which causes your toenails to become discolored, thickened, and brittle, from someone else who was infected. Tinea and other fungal strains can infect you through breaks in the skin, such as cuts or scrapes, which means that going barefoot makes you more prone to becoming infected.

But you didn’t notice that someone else had it, so how could you have gotten it?

There are a few ways you may have become infected, including:

  • Going barefoot in communal showers and locker rooms – Tinea thrives in warm, moist environments, so if someone who had fungal toenails or Athlete’s foot (also caused by tinea) was barefoot in the same places, your feet could have picked up the fungus. This also goes for communal pools or saunas where you walk barefoot in warm, moist areas.
  • Sharing a foot towel with someone who has foot or toenail fungus increases your chance of being infected.
  • Borrowing shoes or socks from someone who is infected.
  • Getting a pedicure at a salon where they did not properly disinfect the tools or sharing nail clippers or nail files with someone who has it.

Here are some Prevention Tips:

  • Stay healthy – Those with weakened immune systems are more likely to be affected by foot and toenail fungus once it enters the skin.
  • Treat cuts or wounds promptly – This is their primary form of entry, so it’s best to pay attention to the area around your toes, especially if you have ingrown toenails.
  • Use flip-flops or shower sandals – After a workout, showering at the gym can be convenient, but be sure not to go barefoot!
  • Change your socks once or twice a day – This is important especially if you sweat a lot due to conditions like hyperhidrosis. Fungi can flourish in your warm, damp shoes.
  • Allow shoes to fully dry before you wear them again – Fungus can survive in shoes for a while if they remain damp. Rotate the shoes you wear each day or get two pairs if you have a favorite work shoe.

For home treatment, you can try topical antifungal medications applied directly to the nails and skin around it. File down thick nails to allow for better penetration. For stubborn fungal nails, you may have to come into our office for stronger treatments including topical, oral, or laser therapies. Schedule an appointment at Crofton Podiatry for the right treatment by contacting us online or calling our Crofton, MD office at (410) 721-4505. You can consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, and our dedicated team. We serve the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD and are ready to assist you.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
August 07, 2017
Category: Footwear

Other than in winter, flats, especially ballet flats, are a popular footwear choice for women. They are more comfortable than high heels, but are fashionable and can be appropriate for work attire. What you may not know, though, is that it can be the root of your foot pain problems!

While they are the best option for closed-toed fashion footwear, they still have their problems, such as:

  • They tend to have narrow toe boxes – For those who have wide feet or have bunions, the front part of the shoes can be constricting. Wearing tight shoes like this can cause or worsen symptoms of bunions, tailor’s bunions, hammertoes, ingrown toenails, and even neuromas. Rather than ballet flats, loafers or boat shoes may be better options.

  • Limited cushioning – Flats tend to have minimal inner sole cushioning so that the shoes can be dainty and thin. This can increase impact on your joints while walking and cause foot fatigue.

  • Little or no arch support – Many times, the inner sole is flat to match the shoe shape, which means that there is no support for the arch. This can cause the foot to work harder to stabilize and cause painful symptoms like that of plantar fasciitis.

  • Little heel support – Footwear should have good heel cupping and cushioning to prevent heel pain and provide stability.

  • Unsupportive shoe shape and quality – Depending on the quality and materials that they are made with, they can cause irritation to your feet in the form of blisters and cuts.

The following are some ways to improve your flat wearing experience:

  • When purchasing flats, make sure to try them on. Try walking around in them. If they are cutting into the top of your feet or feel crowded in the toebox, they are not the shoes for you. Your toes should be able to wiggle around a bit, but not enough that your foot slides around in the shoes.

  • Recently, podiatrists have been working with shoemakers to design comfortable, supportive flats. Look for these types of shoes with supportive features built in.

  • For flats that do not have adequate cushioning, arch support, or heel support, try using orthotic inserts. You’ll probably be able to walk around in them for longer without foot fatigue.

  • Try not to wear shoes barefoot. Even sheer, no show socks can help prevent chafing and blisters.

If you are experiencing foot pain after a long day in your shoes, you may want to consider making a change. For persisting problems that cause you pain, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505