(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: orthotic inserts

By Crofton Podiatry
May 23, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Diabetes   shoes   stretch   orthotic inserts  

When a foot cramp strikes, it can certainly cause a lot of pain. The pain can come about suddenly and last for a while, depending on how you treat it when it happens.

Why it happens is another story. The specific cause of foot cramps is not known, but there seem to be some factors that trigger the cramping:

  • Dehydration or electrolyte imbalance - The muscles in your body need water to function and rehabilitate properly. Specific minerals and salts are required to send the correct nerve impulses that control your muscles.
  • Overworking your foot muscles - Standing, walking, and/or working your feet for long periods of time can cause muscle fatigue and sudden cramping.
  • Shoes that are not supportive - When your shoes are not supportive, it can cause your feet to overly strain. This can overwork the muscles, ligaments, and tendons. 
  • Poor circulation - Those with diseases that cause poor circulation, like diabetes, can lead to cramps because necessary nutrients are not getting to the foot muscles.

So what do you do when your foot cramps?

  • While it seems counterintuitive, stand and put weight on your cramping foot to stretch it.
  • If you are sitting, flex your foot and pull your toes toward you to stretch out the muscles and tendons along the bottom of the feet. If you can’t reach your toes, use a towel or strap to keep your feet flexed until the cramping goes away.
  • Gently massage the foot while it is flexed to help the cramp to relax.
  • If the pain is severe initially, you can apply ice to find relief. However, if the cramp continues, use heat to relax the cramping feet.

The best defense against foot cramps is prevention! Try some or all of the following to reduce your chances of experiencing painful foot cramps:

  • Stay hydrated and eat plenty of nutritious foods. If you seem to experience cramps after overexertion from working out, try drinks with electrolytes to help.
  • Remember to stretch before and after workouts or long walks.
  • Treat any diseases or conditions that might be causing the cramping as a side effect. Some medications can also cause cramping as a side effect, so it’s best to speak to your physician if you think this is the case.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, especially if you stand or walk a lot during the day.

If you need orthotic inserts or custom orthoses to help you prevent foot strain, we can help you. To get an assessment for your chronic foot cramps, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 25, 2018
Category: Proper Foot Wear

Depending on the type of work you do, you may be required to wear specific types of shoes. Construction workers might need to wear heavy-duty boots, while nurses need to wear safety shoes to protect themselves from needles and other hazards. And while safety comes first, does that mean you should sacrifice on foot comfort and health?

While most work shoes do have some level of comfort and support built in, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s enough for your feet. This is especially true when your work shoes begin to wear down. 

The following are tips for making sure that your work shoes are working for YOU:

  • Make sure you have enough arch and heel support. This will prevent painful symptoms for people who have flat feet or tend to overpronate. Good heel cups help you keep your feet stable so that the Achilles’ tendon does not have to become strained.
  • Check the level of cushioning. Press down on the inner soles of the shoes every now and then to make sure that you still have cushioning to absorb impact to the bones and joints in the feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back.
  • Buy anti-slip outer soles. Work shoes should have adequate tread to make sure that you are not at high risk for slipping on clean floors or on wet, slick surfaces. 
  • Get measured each time you buy work shoes. The best time to buy shoes, especially work shoes (which you will spend 35+ hours wearing each week), is in the afternoon, when your feet are a bit swollen from walking or standing during the day. 
  • Avoid shoes that make your feet feel cramped. Shoes with tight toe boxes do not always “break in”. Scrunching your feet into shoes that feel cramped are more likely to leave you with worse symptoms of bunions, blisters, or hammertoes.
  • Look for signs of wearing out or breaking down. If they look or feel like they are worn down, they probably are. If the insole or outer sole is very much reduced from when you first bought the work shoes, it’s a sign that your shoes are not working for you. Additionally, if there are cuts, scrapes, or broken parts of the shoes, it’s definitely time to replace the shoes.
  • Replace shoes approximately every 6 months. Typically, work shoes can go about 3-500 miles before they need to be replaced. Be good to your feet and replace them instead of trying to wear shoes until they are no longer usable.

For some of you, work shoes might mean high heels or flats. The same tips above apply, but the safety features might not be built in.

Everyone who wears work shoes that are not quite fitting properly or comfortably, you may benefit from using orthotic inserts. For those with specific shoe needs, our podiatrist can help you with custom orthotics. Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your working feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment or orthotic device. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

In our last post, we spoke about when you should replace the shoes that you wear so that they will not cause harm to your feet. Now, we’d like to talk about a particular type of shoes (high heels) and how they can affect your foot health.

Whether it’s for work, going out to dinner, dancing, or special events, women have specific foot issues that can be aggravated by or attributed to wearing high heels on an almost-daily basis. The higher the heel of the shoes, the more pressure is placed on the forefoot. The midfoot, balls of the feet, and toes have to endure more strain, leading to more problems such as metatarsalgia, hammertoes, Morton’s neuroma, and/or bunions. Additionally, the tendons and ligaments along the foot and ankles must work harder to keep you stabilized throughout the day.

What’s worse, the high heels make your feet and ankles act like they are walking downhill all day. This means more strain (and therefore, pain) on the calves, knees, and back, throwing your alignment out of whack. So if you have been having back, neck, or shoulder pain, it may be caused by your shoes!

So then, what are my options?

  • If you feel that you have to wear high heels, try to find ways to get out of them periodically. You can take them off while you’re sitting at your desk, while driving, and while commuting. It will help reduce the risk of repetitive stress on the feet, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.
  • Also, as often as you can, stretch your feet and toes to release from their cramped environment. Doing a deep calf stretch, including pulling the toes back will be beneficial for your entire foot.
  • When you purchase high-heeled shoes, do your best to try them on and walk around in them for a bit to see if they feel comfortable. We would advise against assuming that shoes will break in. Pointy-toe shoes can squeeze your toes into uncomfortable positions, adding force to the big toe joint and directly onto the toes. Look for a wider toe box and a shoe that follows the natural curves of your feet. A thicker/chunkier heel will help with stabilization and balance, as will a good fit. Don’t buy shoes that are a little bit big or small – it has to fit well to reduce the risk of foot pain.
  • If your high heels seem comfortable but could use a bit of support, orthotic inserts, such as for the arches or the balls of your feet, you may experience less strain on the feet.

Do you have foot pain from wearing high heels on a daily basis? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you create custom orthotics. Contact our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
March 06, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear

You may not realize it, but shoes have a lifespan. Depending on what they are used for and how often they are used, shoes may need to be replaced as often as every 3 to 4 months!

Why is it important to get new shoes?

Maybe it’s because you love to shop for and collect footwear, or maybe you’re an avid runner. Regardless of why you get new shoes, there is a good foot health reason for getting new shoes. Yes, there IS an actual excuse to go shoe shopping!

When you first purchase shoes, the material is usually rigid, there is plenty of cushioning on the insole, and the outer rubber sole provides a lot of traction. Over time, however, the materials can become softer and worn down. The insoles no longer support you the way they once did, and you might feel more impact with every step you take.

Worn down shoes can begin to cause you problems if you do not replace them (or at least remedy them with orthotic inserts). When shoes lose their supportive features, your feet have to strain to stabilize you as you walk or run. The repetitive and long-term strain on your feet or ankles can lead to painful issues such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. Furthermore, if you keep wearing your favorite pair of shoes until they are falling apart, you could also be risking bacterial or fungal growth in the material, which can lead to foot odor or skin disease.

When should I get new shoes?

Look for some of these signs for the right time to replace shoes:

  • If shoes no longer feel snug on your feet, no matter how tightly you tie the shoelaces, they are probably losing structural support.
  • If you can no longer feel cushion in the inner soles, you need to get new shoes or add orthotic inserts.
  • If the tread on your shoes (especially hiking shoes) is reduced, and you seem to slip on dirt trails, you should get new shoes to prevent injury.
  • If the shoes no longer support your arches, allowing them to fall flat when you walk, it’s time to replace them.
  • If your heels slip around in your shoes, the heel cups are too worn down.

Remember to buy shoes that are comfortable and supportive when you try them on in the store. You shouldn’t rely on them to “break in” and get more comfortable later, as some materials do not allow for it.

Having trouble finding shoes that support your foot needs? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and, if necessary, help you with custom orthotics. Come see our friendly podiatric team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505