(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: orthotic

By Crofton Podiatry
October 30, 2018
Category: Feet Safety

What do you usually like to do on Halloween? Trick or Treat with family? Party with friends? Visit a Haunted House? Whatever your plans are, in order to have a fun night on the town, make sure that you take precautions to stay safe! You’ll want to pay a little extra attention to keeping your feet safe since you’ll probably be on them the whole time.

Here are a few tips and tricks for a safe and happy Halloween night!

  • Make sure to wear comfortable and supportive shoes, with socks! The weather has gotten pretty cold, so stick to closed-toed shoes. You don’t want to come back to numb or frozen toes! If your shoes need to be part of your costume, find creative ways to dress up your shoes or cover them. 
  • Avoid high heels. Sure, an alluring costume might call for a great pair of stilettos or knee-high boots, but there are plenty of fashionable shoes available that do not have heels that are higher than 2 inches. It would be a bummer to have to end the night early because your feet are aching.
  • Does your costume involve a long garment or dress? Be sure that it’s not so long that you’ll trip over it. 
  • Plan out a safe route, avoiding dimly lit areas. If you can’t see where you’re going, you might trip on some debris, the curb, or uneven sidewalks. You might end up with a twisted or sprained ankle.
  • If possible, incorporate some reflective tape into your costume or the back of your shoes. Be careful of bikes or cars speeding by – especially since electric and hybrid cars have become so silent lately.

If you have noticed that a particular part of your feet are tired, even though you didn’t wear high heels or narrow shoes, you may need extra special support for your feet. Our podiatrist can assess your orthotic needs.

Come see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, who can properly assess your foot or ankle problems. Make an appointment today at Crofton Podiatry by calling (410) 721-4505. Dr. Toll and his staff are ready to improve your foot health at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 24, 2018
Category: exercise
Tags: swelling   Gout   stretch   walking   orthotic   comfortable shoes   obesity  

It’s easier than ever to lead a sedentary lifestyle. Most people work at a job where they sit for most of the day, the latest movies are readily accessible without even leaving the comfort of your home, and there are even robots that will vacuum the house for you! Yes, it’s convenient, but is it also making us less healthy?

If you feel that you have begun to lead a more sedentary lifestyle, it may be time to reassess how much time you spend engaging in physical activity. One easy way to do this is to incorporate a brisk walk into your day, on the treadmill or around your block. You can use this time to clear your head, meditate, talk to a friend, or listen to an audiobook. Plus, your body will thank you!

Benefits of Walking for Overall Health

  • Walking can help you manage your weight. You can power walk or walk for longer periods with inclines to help you burn more calories for weight maintenance or weight loss. Maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk of developing other health problems.
  • It can improve your mood and help you de-stress. Take meaningful and controlled strides to help you feel grounded.
  • Strengthen your bones and muscles; engage your tendons and ligaments; get your blood pumping.
  • Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure by exercising your heart.

Benefits of Walking for Foot Health

  • Strengthen the bones and muscles of the feet and ankles.
  • Increase flexibility and stability in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments.
  • A healthy weight can reduce the risk of obesity, which can put a lot of strain on the feet and ankles.
  • Increase circulation and reduce swelling. (For those who have gout attacks in the joints of the feet, walking encourages circulation, which can help reduce the pain due to uric acid build up.)

Tips for enjoying your walks:

  • Make sure to wear comfortable and supportive shoes, with socks! If you need extra support, our podiatrist can assess your orthotic needs.
  • Warm up and loosen up stiff muscles before you set out on a brisk walk.
  • Stretch after each walk to cool down and encourage muscle recovery.
  • Start slow, but challenge yourself to gradually take slightly faster walks.

If you notice pain or a problem with sensation when you walk, our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, can properly assess your foot and ankle problems. Make an appointment today at Crofton Podiatry by calling (410) 721-4505 or contacting us online!  Dr. Toll and his dedicated staff look forward to serving you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 11, 2018
Category: Bunion
Tags: high heels   flats   shoes   surgery   orthotic  

While the wrong types of shoes may not directly cause bunions, they can be the reason why they become worse. Long-term use of shoes that do not have the proper foot support can lead the bunion becoming larger, stiffer, and more painful.

So what actually causes bunions?

While the exact cause is unknown, it seems that genetics, injuries to the big toe joint, and excessive pressure to the forefoot causes the big toe to begin pointing toward the other toes. The bony spur develops as a response to direct pressure, improper healing, or as a support to the big toe joint.

Then what types of shoes make bunion symptoms worse?

  • High heels (higher than 2 inches) – Wearing high heels puts an extraneous strain on the forefoot, especially at the big toe joint. The extra pressure can cause inflammation and pain after even just a few minutes. Eventually, it can cause the bony spur to get bigger and more painful.
  • Narrow and/or pointed-toe shoes – While some shoes seem very fashionable and trendy by being pointy or narrow, it’s not actually the right shape for your feet. Forcing your feet to spend the day walking in narrow or pointy shoes can further force your big toe to point toward your other toes.
  • Tight shoes or shoes that are small for you - Don’t forget that your feet swell a little bit throughout the day, so it’s best to find shoes that fit you in the afternoon. Additionally, some shoes do not come in half sizes, so you may have to size up or down. Be careful with sizing down since your feet (and bunions) need space to feel comfortable.
  • Stiff, non-adjustable shoes – Shoes with elastic material, straps, or laces will allow you to adjust your shoes to comfort as the day goes on. Again, tight shoes will only make bunion symptoms worse! If your bunion becomes inflamed, you’ll want to give your feet some breathing room by adjusting them.
  • Flats – Ballerina flats and other flat shoes that do not have arch support can cause more pressure on the big toe joint. If you prefer to wear flats, try adding arch support inserts to feel more comfortable.

What is the lesson learned? If you have bunions, don’t make them worse with the wrong shoes. Try looking for footwear that is low-heeled, comfortable, roomy for your toes, supportive for your arches, and adjustable throughout the day.

Of course, those with severe bunions already should speak with our podiatrist for the best solution. You may need custom orthotic shoes to fit severely deformed feet. Surgery might even be necessary if bunions really get in the way of your life.

We can help you! Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Come to visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

If you’ve been a runner for a while, you know how much your feet endure when you hit the pavement. A long run or even a quick sprint can leave your feet throbbing, aching, or in pain. Long-term, you might suffer from foot problems such as chronic plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis.

Still, you can’t beat that runner’s high, right? If you can’t seem to resist that daily run, here are Top 5 Tips you can use to take care of your Runners’ Feet:

  1. Start slowly and increase slowly. Beginners should start with a slow pace and a short distance and increase as experience grows. If you increase speed or incline too much, too quickly, you can end up straining the tendons and ligaments in your feet and ankles.
  2. Use the right shoes. Running shoes should be supportive and have adequate cushioning to reduce the impact on the bones and joints. Repetitive pounding on the hard surfaces can lead to weakened bones that are prone to fractures. Arches and heel cups will keep the feet stable in the shoes. If you have existing foot problems, you can use orthotic inserts to prevent worsening symptoms. 
  3. Don’t skimp on socks. Wearing shoes without socks can lead to irritation and blisters on the skin of the feet. Sweaty feet can make the shoes smelly, and increase the chances of bacterial or fungal infection like Athlete’s foot. Always wear a clean, fresh pair of socks for running to reduce the likelihood of foot issues.
  4. Stretch the toes, feet, ankles, and calves. Always warm up and cool down, including stretching of the lower extremities. Strengthening the toes can help to reduce chances of toe deformities and help you stabilize your feet in the shoes.
  5. Practice good foot hygiene. After a good sweaty running session, you’ll want to make sure to wash your feet (probably while you shower) with soap and warm water and then change into a new pair of socks. If you run every day, you may want to invest in more than one pair of shoes so that you can allow them to dry out completely between running sessions. Keep toenails short and take care of any ingrown toenails or fungal toenails. Additionally, any cuts and scrapes can become more inflamed while running, so be sure to treat them promptly.

If you’ve sustained an injury while running, or if you have concerns with whether or not your feet are in shape for running, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, at Crofton Podiatry. Call us today at (410) 721-4505 to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
April 18, 2018
Category: Children's Feet

Did you know that children’s bones do not fully develop until the ages of 18 to 25? That’s why it’s so important to make sure that when your child incurs an injury, a doctor looks it over. This is especially true when the injury involves the feet or ankles since there are 26 bones that can be affected on each side.

A condition that commonly affects growing children’s growing bones is Sever’s Disease. Also known as Calcaneal Apophysitis, the growth plate in the back of the heel bone has inflammation or swelling, causing pain to your child. Overuse, repeated impact, or blunt injury to the heel bone can cause pain in the back of the foot, making it painful to stand or walk.

Who is usually affected?

The causes of foot pain described above are typical for children and teens that play sports. Those who jump and run repeatedly during practice and games tend to be the ones who suffer from Sever’s Disease. Football, basketball, and long jump athletes tend to experience this type of heel pain. Additionally, children who are obese or have conditions like flat feet are also at higher risk of developing heel pain from the repeated strain on the Achilles tendon.

How can my child feel better?

As soon as your child complains of heel pain, check for symptoms like inflammation or swelling, redness, and tenderness. Pain when squeezing the sides of the heel bone will also indicate a likelihood of Sever’s Disease. For a proper diagnosis, it’s best to make an appointment to see our podiatrist. Additionally, the following treatments might help:

  • RICE method (at home): Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation will help relieve symptoms and reduce pain. Your child should stay off the affected foot (feet) to avoid further aggravation.
  • Orthotic inserts (over-the-counter): You can try to buy some heel inserts to see if supporting and cushioning the heel helps to relieve painful symptoms.
  • Physical Therapy (podiatrist-prescribed): When you see our podiatrist, he might recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles to better support the heel. Stretching can help relieve symptoms and promote healing.
  • Immobilization (podiatrist-prescribed): If the condition is severe, our podiatrist might recommend a cast or custom orthotic device to prevent your child from experiencing worse symptoms.

If your child complains of foot pain, it’s never a good sign. Make an appointment promptly by calling Crofton Podiatry in Maryland at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your children’s feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505