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By Crofton Podiatry
April 18, 2018
Category: Children's Feet

Did you know that children’s bones do not fully develop until the ages of 18 to 25? That’s why it’s so important to make sure that when your child incurs an injury, a doctor looks it over. This is especially true when the injury involves the feet or ankles since there are 26 bones that can be affected on each side.

A condition that commonly affects growing children’s growing bones is Sever’s Disease. Also known as Calcaneal Apophysitis, the growth plate in the back of the heel bone has inflammation or swelling, causing pain to your child. Overuse, repeated impact, or blunt injury to the heel bone can cause pain in the back of the foot, making it painful to stand or walk.

Who is usually affected?

The causes of foot pain described above are typical for children and teens that play sports. Those who jump and run repeatedly during practice and games tend to be the ones who suffer from Sever’s Disease. Football, basketball, and long jump athletes tend to experience this type of heel pain. Additionally, children who are obese or have conditions like flat feet are also at higher risk of developing heel pain from the repeated strain on the Achilles tendon.

How can my child feel better?

As soon as your child complains of heel pain, check for symptoms like inflammation or swelling, redness, and tenderness. Pain when squeezing the sides of the heel bone will also indicate a likelihood of Sever’s Disease. For a proper diagnosis, it’s best to make an appointment to see our podiatrist. Additionally, the following treatments might help:

  • RICE method (at home): Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation will help relieve symptoms and reduce pain. Your child should stay off the affected foot (feet) to avoid further aggravation.
  • Orthotic inserts (over-the-counter): You can try to buy some heel inserts to see if supporting and cushioning the heel helps to relieve painful symptoms.
  • Physical Therapy (podiatrist-prescribed): When you see our podiatrist, he might recommend physical therapy to strengthen muscles to better support the heel. Stretching can help relieve symptoms and promote healing.
  • Immobilization (podiatrist-prescribed): If the condition is severe, our podiatrist might recommend a cast or custom orthotic device to prevent your child from experiencing worse symptoms.

If your child complains of foot pain, it’s never a good sign. Make an appointment promptly by calling Crofton Podiatry in Maryland at (410) 721-4505 to consult with our board-certified podiatrist Dr. Brad Toll. He can assess your children’s feet and prescribe the appropriate treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2018
Category: sports injuries

There are so many things to consider for your March Madness picks – how the teams have played in during their season, star athletes, and the team’s history in these postseason matchups. Now take a step back and take into consideration, the foot and ankle injuries that have plagued each team, and how that might affect your bracket picks.

Kentucky’s Jarred Vanderbilt, for example, was out with an ankle injury, and continued limping, several days later. Depending on the type of injury, ankles can heal quickly, but others can take as long as 6 weeks or more to heal, especially if it’s a severe ankle sprain.

Kansas State’s Dean Wade and Miami’s Bruce Brown, Jr. are both suffering from foot injuries that leave them in much uncertainty heading into the first few games. There’s a good chance they will have to sit out as their injuries heal and they are cleared to participate.

While you might have noticed that some of the previously injured college basketball stars are “healed” from their injuries, we want to caution you from getting your hopes too high. Most foot, ankle, and knee injuries may eventually feel good enough to play, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are fully healed. It’s actually in these “almost 100%” times that a more serious re-injury can occur. Rehabilitative measures, such as an ankle brace and physical therapy might be necessary to get athletes back to 100%.

Depending on the severity of the injuries the athletes incur, they may need many weeks of rest, immobilization, or even surgery to ensure that they have a future career, even beyond the NCAA tournament.

Got inspired by March Madness and went to play some pickup basketball? For mild or moderate injuries, request an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry can assess your injury and find you the right treatment. Our friendly podiatric team looks forward to seeing you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
December 29, 2017
Category: Arthritis

You may have heard older loved ones talk about how the weather affects their joints. Days characterized by poor weather seem to make symptoms worse, especially when it’s raining or cold. For those who struggle with arthritis pain, even the day-to-day can be difficult; so when the winter chill rolls in, joint pain management can be more challenging. And of course, the many joints present in the feet and ankles are also prone to feeling more achy, stiff, and/or painful.

We mentioned some ways you can care for your arthritic feet in a previous post, but the following are some additional tips for foot care and pain management in the cold winter weather:

  • Dress warmly. Always wear socks when you go outside – double up if you get cold easily. If your feet get cold easily, even indoors, wear socks or slippers (with non-slip grips on the bottom for smooth floors; smooth bottomed socks and slippers for carpet).
  • Eat nutritiously, including vitamin D supplements, especially if you have osteoarthritis. Less hours of sunlight and winter weather can mean a vitamin D deficiency for many. Also be sure to add plenty of sources of omega-3 fatty acids for joint health.
  • Stay physically active, both inside and outside. Taking brisk walks and doing aerobic exercises (on an exercise mat) are great ways to keep your blood pumping and your feet and ankles engaged.
  • Keep up with physical therapy, if that is part of your arthritis care. It may even be beneficial to start physical therapy during the weather for worse symptoms. Talk to your physician or our podiatrist for more information.
  • Wear safe shoes and be careful with winter activities and sports. Over-the-counter orthotic inserts may help, but you may need custom orthotics to reduce painful symptoms. If you must go outside in the cold or snow, be sure to wear warm shoes that have non-skid outer soles.
  • Stay hydrated to help with circulation. Some studies suggest that dehydration can make you more sensitive to pain!
  • Take warm baths and get foot massages. Warm baths, hot tubs, or warm water swimming pools can be helpful in relieving arthritis pain. Additionally, find relief by pampering your feet with a foot soak and massage.

If the winter weather has got your feet or ankles in pain, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry to make sure it isn’t something else causing the pain. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
December 13, 2017
Category: Bunion

Not only do bunions run in the family, they are more likely to affect women because of the types of shoes they wear. Just ask some famous women who are known for sporting the high heels: Amal Clooney, Victoria Beckham, and Jennifer Lopez. These celebrities have been spotted with the big toe joint deformity and as with everyone else, need to take care of them.

The usual treatment options for small or newly forming bunions include:

  • Bunion pads to cushion the bump from irritation in shoes,
  • Splints to keep the big toe forward instead of turned in toward the other toes,
  • Changing to shoes without high heels and with a roomier toe box,
  • Orthotic inserts to relieve pressure on the big toe joint, AND
  • Cortisone injections for pain relief.

However, for some, bunions can just keep getting worse, with a bony spur developing to the point where it’s difficult to find shoes that will fit properly. The symptoms associated with the deformity can be debilitating, to the point of not being able to walk without pain. It can even lead to other problems with the feet as the deformity causes other problems like corns and calluses, and hammertoes.

When bunions get in the way of your living your life, our podiatrist may turn the conversation toward bunion surgery. Here’s what you should know:

  • Bunion surgery is usually a last resort after all other options have been explored.
  • It is usually performed as an outpatient procedure.
  • The bunion can be surgically corrected by removing bony spurs or by cutting and realigning the big toe joint.
  • Other procedures may be required, depending on the extent of the bunion problem. If the bunion is due to arthritis or other joint problem, screws or metal plates may be needed to replace the joint.
  • It takes many weeks to recover. Rest is important so the foot should not bear weight. Using crutches and wearing a boot or cast is necessary for protection. There will probably be swelling for a few weeks.
  • The time it takes to heal properly will depend on the procedure and how well you adhere to rehabilitation steps (such as physical therapy).
  • This is not necessarily a one-time fix. Bunions can recur, especially if you go back to old habits that made it worse in the first place.

If bunions have affected your lifestyle, and have been a persistent problem for you, consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to receive a thorough assessment to see if surgery is the answer. Our friendly staff is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie.

By Crofton Podiatry
July 05, 2017
Category: Ankle Sprains

Newly-drafted Charlotte Hornet, Malik Monk, will be out for the summer due to an ankle injury sustained during the draft workout process. The Hornets were hoping to see how he does with the team as shooting guard, but that will have to wait until his injury has healed. The outlook is that he will have to wait 2-4 weeks while rehabilitating his ankle. 

While the Hornets will miss out on practicing with him as a team, Monk will still be able to watch and learn how the team functions. The 2-4 weeks that he will be out suggests that it was most likely a minor or moderate ankle sprain – a Grade 1 or 2 Sprain. The time spent on healing and treatment will reduce the chance of re-injury or worsening symptoms.

About Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when the ankle is turned beyond its limits, causing excessive stretching and tearing of a ligament. Most sprains occur on the ligament along the outside of the ankle, but they can also happen on the inside as well.

In the case of mild sprains (Grade 1), the ligament can be overstretched and have small tears, but for severe sprains (Grade 3), it can tear completely. All sprains will cause tenderness and swelling, but the severity of symptoms will depend on the degree of the sprain. Symptoms will also last longer and will require more treatment and rehabilitation with higher grade levels.

Immediately after a mild sprain, it’s best to use the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation) to alleviate pain and swelling. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are helpful in reducing symptoms as well.

For a Grade 2 or 3 sprain, which involves more pain and instability, the ankle will need immobilization with a cast or brace for about 2 or 3 weeks. Patients will probably need crutches to keep weight off of the injured ankle. Additionally, as the ankle heals, it will benefit from physical therapy to help restore full function.

Our Podiatrist can help!

We won’t know exactly when Monk will be back in play, but we do know that rest is best for sprains. If you suffer an ankle injury, get properly diagnosed by our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. After a physical examination, as well as in-office imaging (if necessary), he will grade the sprain in order to choose the best treatment for you. You can make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505