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By Brad Toll, DPM
October 04, 2019
Category: Athlete's Foot
Tags: podiatrist   Athlete's Foot   sports   rash   infection  

Sports are often a big part of our lives whether we watch or participate. This is especially true in the Fall as many children go back to school and play football, basketball, Lacrosse and field hockey among others. With sports also comes the possibility for injury or ailment. One of the major conditions an athlete can suffer from is called Athlete’s foot otherwise known as tinea pedis. What is Athlete’s foot? Athlete’s foot is a contagious fungal infection (trichophyton) that usually occurs between the toes and thrives in moist conditions.

Causes of Athlete’s foot include:

  • Sweaty feet
  • Sharing towels, shoes and socks
  • Walking barefoot in public places

Symptoms of Athlete’s foot include:

  • Scaly red rash in and around the toes
  • Peeling skin usually between toes but can spread to other areas of the foot
  • Blisters or ulcers near toes
  • Itchiness with dry and flaky skin

If not treated, Athlete’s foot can spread to the groin or hands. While most cases of Athlete’s foot can be treated with over the counter medicines, some have to be diagnosed and treated by your podiatrist. If needed, your podiatrist will treat Athlete’s foot by prescribing:

  • Oral anti-fungal attacks fungus
  • Oral antibiotics to treat infections
  • Topical steroids to treat painful inflammation
  • Topical anti-fungal meds include miconazole, terbinafine

The best treatment for Athlete’s foot is prevention. Suggestions include:

  • Wearing dry footwear and socks
  • Wear sandals or flip-flops in public places like showers, pools or locker rooms
  • Make sure you dry your feet completely after a shower or bath
  • Treat your feet with anti-fungal powder or skin cream
  • Alternate shoes
  • Air your feet
  • Don’t share socks, footwear or towels

If you believe you have Athlete’s foot, or have any other concerns about your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
May 08, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

While many of us work at desk jobs, many others do not. Still, it is not uncommon for us to develop sore feet not from a callus or other medical malady, but from simple overuse. Careers that require long periods of standing or walking such as construction, sports, medicine or education see tired feet as a normal, but not welcome part of the job. So how do we deal with this? I suggest the following:

Ways to Soothe Tired and Achy Feet:

  • Soak your feet – soak your feet in a tub of warm water mixed with Epsom salt. Soak for about 20 minutes. This can relieve sore muscles and reduce swelling. 1 cup of Epsom salt to a tub of warm water.
  • Stretch – slowly stretch your foot muscles including your toes and ankle careful not to over extend each. Slow, steady pressure in one direction will gradually loosen tight muscles and promote the free flow of blood in your circulatory system replenishing all important red blood cells.
  • Get a foot massage – sit and rub the bottom of your feet careful to treat the whole sole. Include your toes and calves.
  • Soak in ice – with painful and swollen feet you can also soak them in a combination of ice and water. 
  • Cushion your feet – use an insole or orthotic to properly support and/or cushion your feet.
  • Proper fitting shoes – check your footwear to make sure they are the proper size and provide proper support especially in the arches. If not, get new footwear. Your podiatrist can make suggestions.

Sore feet are a common occurrence and are a valid reason to see your podiatrist. Doing so will ensure that the problem is relatively minor unless other conditions are contributing to your discomfort.

If you’re suffering from sore feet or have any other concerns about your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 24, 2019
Category: Footwear
Tags: podiatrist   hiking boots   running shoe   proper fit   feet  

When it comes to spending time outdoors, activities like camping, fishing and hiking require a different type of footwear, one more durable and especially designed for more rugged activity.

Hiking boots can be broken down into three main categories. They are:

  • Low cut and light weight – very near a running shoe with basic cushioning.
  • Day hiking boots – Usually a mid-ankle type of footwear that provides more ankle support and will usually have a more aggressive sole. Used for midday hikes with a light backpack.
  • Backpacking boots – Mid ankle to high footwear designed to carry heavy loads with the most aggressive tread.

Hiking boots can be made of many different materials depending on what and how you plan to use them. Among them are full grain leather, synthetic and waterproof materials. Boots can also be insulated to protect against the cold and frostbite especially important if you plan on using them during the winter or in inclement weather.  

Tips for choosing the right boot:

  • Know your size – Measure your foot in the store.
  • Wear the right socks – wear the socks you plan on using with the boot for a proper fit.  
  • Boots should be snug and supportive– Your foot should be comfortably snug like a regular shoe, especially with the laces tied firmly. They should also provide proper support for walking on hard surfaces or long lengths of time.
  • Proper laces – choose braided laces if you can, avoiding leather or cloth. Both the latter eventually rip and tear, very frustrating if you’re on the trail and they suddenly break.
  • Try new boots on at the end of the day – Your feet swell by late afternoon, so make sure they fit when they are a little bigger.

One more important aspect of the boot is the tread. Often the heavier the boot, the more aggressive the tread, but this is not always true. Know the kind of surface you’re going to be walking on, staying away from a hard and slippery tread if you’re going to walk on rocks or other possibly smooth surfaces. A softer and more flexible tread would be better.  

If you have any questions about choosing the proper footwear or have any other questions about your feet, call our office and make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and the make the appropriate suggestions or find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

There are many reasons why you might find yourself limping due to pain in your feet or toes. It could be a bunion, callus or corn all of which are quite treatable. One, though, may require more than average especially if it’s not taken care of. An Ingrown toenail may sound somewhat minor to the average person, but if not taken care of can require surgery to fix, something most people will want to avoid if possible and do if needed.

An ingrown toenail is when your toenail starts to grow into the actual toe groove causing pain and discomfort. What may start out to be a slight issue can quickly escalate.

Causes of Ingrown Toenails include:

  • Poor fitting shoes – shoes that are too tight at the toes not allowing for growth and pushing the nails inward.
  • Poor trimming – nails that are not trimmed properly can grow this way.
  • Family History – a history of ingrown toenails in your family can be passed on to relatives.
  • Trauma – trauma to the toes may case nails to grow inward.

Symptoms of an ingrown toenail include redness, swelling, pain and possible drainage from an ongoing infection. Any or all of these can indicate an ingrown toenail. In other words, if the toenail is ingrown you will know it by how it looks and feels.

If you do have an ingrown toenail you will want to see your podiatrist as they are best trained to assess and treat them. You want to catch it before it progresses too far, and surgery is needed. To avoid getting them you will want to do the following.

  • Wash your feet with anti-bacterial soap to keep feet and toes clean and dry.
  • Cut your nails straight across, not on a curve.
  • Cut them when they are soft like after a bath or shower.
  • Wear proper fitting shoes not too tight or too loose at the toes.

Treatment beyond trimming the nails could include the podiatrist cutting out the sides of the toenails to stop the ingrown nail from growing further which in most cases is quite successful.

If you believe you have an ingrown toenail or any other concerns with your feet, call our office and make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 01, 2019
Category: Shin Splints
Tags: podiatrist   flat feet   footwear   stretch   shin splint   insoles  

With warmer weather on its way, Spring promises to provide more and more opportunities for outdoor activities. Basketball, running, tennis and other sports all require the constant pounding of feet against the ground, and with this, can follow something called a shin splint. What is a shin splint? Defined as a common foot-related injury, shin splints, also known as tibial stress syndrome, is caused when stress on your shinbone and the connective tissues that attach your muscles to your bones become inflamed and painful, making running or even walking very difficult.

Causes of Shin Splints:

  • Flat feet – The lack of an arch to absorb shock every time the foot hits the ground.
  • Poor fitting footwear – footwear must fit your feet and provide overall support, especially for hi-impact sports or activities.
  • Failing to stretch before activities - It is very important to stretch the foot and leg muscles before any activity to loosen them and get the blood circulating.
  • Weak ankles, hips and core muscles – as the body works in unison, each works in tandem to help the foot better absorb shock.

How to Treat Shin Splints:

  • Rest – if injured, take time off from your activity giving your body time to heal.
  • Ice – putting ice on the affected area will reduce pain and inflammation. It is recommended you do this for 20 to 30 minutes every 3 to 4 hours for 2 to 3 days or until it is better.
  • Insoles – wear store bought or custom insoles or inserts that strengthen your arch.
  • Anti-inflammatory medicine – ibuprofen or other medicine. Be especially careful to use only as directed. Your podiatrist would be the best source of information.
  • Surface choice – if you’re a runner who likes to run on hard pavement, consider finding a softer surface like an artificial track often found at high schools or other public areas.
  • Medical exam – see your podiatrist to make sure you do not have any other related injury.

If you believe you are prone to or already have shin splints or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505