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By Crofton Podiatry
December 12, 2018
Category: Foot safety
Tags: stretch   frostbite  

Dreaming of a white Christmas? The cold weather of winter sure makes us hope for snow!

However, we shouldn’t forget that where there is snow, there is a risk of injury. The roads and walkways can become more slippery and hazardous! We’ve got shoveling responsibilities ahead!

So let’s talk about how to keep our feet safe while we shovel so that we can enjoy the snow afterward! Here are some safety shoveling tips:

  • Bundle up the feet – Have you ever gotten snow in your shoes when you weren’t wearing socks? That ice-cold feeling can last for days! In severe cases, it can even lead to frostbite. So make sure you wear warm socks with waterproof, non-slip shoes. You wouldn’t want to slip on any ice that might be hiding under the snow. Boots made of thick material that cover the ankle (or higher) will be helpful in keeping the snow out and protecting your foot from injuries.
  • Warm up – You might think of shoveling as a chore, but it’s also very much a workout. Your entire body is involved in pushing the snow out of the way. That’s why so many people throw out their backs while shoveling! To help prevent back pain, be sure to warm up and stretch all parts of your body, not just your arms and legs. Your feet need to grip and stabilize your legs, so give them a good, specific warm-up too!
  • Use the right shovel – There are many different shapes and sizes of shovels to get the job done. Mainly you want to think about if you’ll be pushing the snow or if you’ll be scooping the snow. A light layer of snow would be an instance where you use a snow pushing shovel while moving a hefty covering of snow would require you to push and then scoop up mounds of snow to the side.
  • Use the right technique – Whichever shovel you use, it’s important to use the proper technique and posture so that you don’t hurt your body. Bend at the knees and use your legs for power, rather than your back. Make sure your feet are pointed in the direction you are pushing or scooping the snow so that you don’t slip or twist your ankle.

If you do experience a foot or ankle injury while shoveling, come to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will help you find the right treatment for your injury. Make an appointment by calling us at Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505. Our office is located in Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie.

By Crofton Podiatry
October 24, 2018
Category: exercise
Tags: swelling   Gout   stretch   walking   orthotic   comfortable shoes   obesity  

It’s easier than ever to lead a sedentary lifestyle. Most people work at a job where they sit for most of the day, the latest movies are readily accessible without even leaving the comfort of your home, and there are even robots that will vacuum the house for you! Yes, it’s convenient, but is it also making us less healthy?

If you feel that you have begun to lead a more sedentary lifestyle, it may be time to reassess how much time you spend engaging in physical activity. One easy way to do this is to incorporate a brisk walk into your day, on the treadmill or around your block. You can use this time to clear your head, meditate, talk to a friend, or listen to an audiobook. Plus, your body will thank you!

Benefits of Walking for Overall Health

  • Walking can help you manage your weight. You can power walk or walk for longer periods with inclines to help you burn more calories for weight maintenance or weight loss. Maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk of developing other health problems.
  • It can improve your mood and help you de-stress. Take meaningful and controlled strides to help you feel grounded.
  • Strengthen your bones and muscles; engage your tendons and ligaments; get your blood pumping.
  • Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure by exercising your heart.

Benefits of Walking for Foot Health

  • Strengthen the bones and muscles of the feet and ankles.
  • Increase flexibility and stability in the muscles, tendons, and ligaments.
  • A healthy weight can reduce the risk of obesity, which can put a lot of strain on the feet and ankles.
  • Increase circulation and reduce swelling. (For those who have gout attacks in the joints of the feet, walking encourages circulation, which can help reduce the pain due to uric acid build up.)

Tips for enjoying your walks:

  • Make sure to wear comfortable and supportive shoes, with socks! If you need extra support, our podiatrist can assess your orthotic needs.
  • Warm up and loosen up stiff muscles before you set out on a brisk walk.
  • Stretch after each walk to cool down and encourage muscle recovery.
  • Start slow, but challenge yourself to gradually take slightly faster walks.

If you notice pain or a problem with sensation when you walk, our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll, can properly assess your foot and ankle problems. Make an appointment today at Crofton Podiatry by calling (410) 721-4505 or contacting us online!  Dr. Toll and his dedicated staff look forward to serving you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
July 25, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips
Tags: dry skin   fracture   stretch   sports   RICE method   cancer   flip-flops   jog  

Got your beach bag ready? Hope you packed a swimsuit, sunblock, sunglasses, flip flops, beach towel, and frozen water bottle for your day at the beach. Whether it be a water park, lakefront, or oceanfront day of relaxation, you should make sure to take precautions for keeping your feet safe too. Here are a few ways to do that:

Skin:

       Hydrate – Be sure to drink a lot of water throughout the day to prevent dehydration (which can also cause dry skin for your feet!)

       Sunblock – Be sure to wear sunblock lotion from the head to the toes to protect from UV (A and B) rays and reapply every couple of hours to reduce the risk of burning and developing skin cancer.

       Hygiene – Wash your feet with warm water and soap at the end of the day to remove sand and any other small particles or microorganisms that may have hitched a ride.

       Cuts and scrapes - When leaving sandy areas, rinse off the feet so that it doesn’t irritate the skin as you walk on smoother surfaces. It’s probably best to put on flip-flops or sandals to prevent problems from walking on rough or very hot surfaces. If you do incur cuts or scrapes, be sure to treat them promptly to prevent infection.

Shoes:

       Water shoes: A great way to keep your feet safe from injury at the beach is to wear water shoes. It will reduce the risk of cuts from sharp objects in the water as well as help with the transition to the sand and then to any boardwalks or other walkways.

Sports:

     Stretch and Warm-up – As soon as you get to the beach, start with some stretching and warm up. Walking on the beach can be unstable for your feet and ankles, and a wrong step can cause an injury. This is especially important if you are going to play sports like volleyball, throwing a Frisbee, or taking a jog.

     Sports injury – If you sustain a mild sports injury, use the RICE method to prevent worsening symptoms. If it’s a more severe injury, like a possible fracture, get the attention of medical staff or go to a local hospital.

Do you have a foot problem from a day at the beach? We can help you feel better. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. We also serve the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
May 23, 2018
Category: Foot Pain
Tags: Diabetes   shoes   stretch   orthotic inserts  

When a foot cramp strikes, it can certainly cause a lot of pain. The pain can come about suddenly and last for a while, depending on how you treat it when it happens.

Why it happens is another story. The specific cause of foot cramps is not known, but there seem to be some factors that trigger the cramping:

  • Dehydration or electrolyte imbalance - The muscles in your body need water to function and rehabilitate properly. Specific minerals and salts are required to send the correct nerve impulses that control your muscles.
  • Overworking your foot muscles - Standing, walking, and/or working your feet for long periods of time can cause muscle fatigue and sudden cramping.
  • Shoes that are not supportive - When your shoes are not supportive, it can cause your feet to overly strain. This can overwork the muscles, ligaments, and tendons. 
  • Poor circulation - Those with diseases that cause poor circulation, like diabetes, can lead to cramps because necessary nutrients are not getting to the foot muscles.

So what do you do when your foot cramps?

  • While it seems counterintuitive, stand and put weight on your cramping foot to stretch it.
  • If you are sitting, flex your foot and pull your toes toward you to stretch out the muscles and tendons along the bottom of the feet. If you can’t reach your toes, use a towel or strap to keep your feet flexed until the cramping goes away.
  • Gently massage the foot while it is flexed to help the cramp to relax.
  • If the pain is severe initially, you can apply ice to find relief. However, if the cramp continues, use heat to relax the cramping feet.

The best defense against foot cramps is prevention! Try some or all of the following to reduce your chances of experiencing painful foot cramps:

  • Stay hydrated and eat plenty of nutritious foods. If you seem to experience cramps after overexertion from working out, try drinks with electrolytes to help.
  • Remember to stretch before and after workouts or long walks.
  • Treat any diseases or conditions that might be causing the cramping as a side effect. Some medications can also cause cramping as a side effect, so it’s best to speak to your physician if you think this is the case.
  • Wear shoes that are supportive, especially if you stand or walk a lot during the day.

If you need orthotic inserts or custom orthoses to help you prevent foot strain, we can help you. To get an assessment for your chronic foot cramps, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
February 14, 2018
Category: Feet Protection

Many wellness experts have said that sitting at your desk all day can have the same effects as smoking and can increase the risk of early death. So are standing desks the answer? Read on to see if they would be right for you!

Pros of Standing Desks:

  • Increased likelihood of movement, more often during the workday. Sitting and standing still for long periods of time can lead to health problems, including varicose veins, decreased circulation, and diabetes. However, if you’re already standing, it is more likely that you will stretch and walk around more often than if you’re complacently sitting.
  • More energy and ability to focus on work. Those who regularly use standing desks have reported that they are better able to focus and stay attentive to work when standing vs. sitting.
  • Reduced back pain – that is, if you can maintain good posture. Many times, when you sit for long periods of time, you tend to conform to poor posture, with your back and shoulders slumped forward and down. When you stand, with good posture (which can be forced by the positioning of the desk, keyboard, and monitor).

Cons of Standing Desks:

  • You may end up standing too still or getting tired and slouching. Often, you can see office workers end up leaning on the desk with one arm. At this point, you should either reset your posture and stretch, or take a break and lower the desk to sitting for a bit. While it may be cumbersome, alternating between sitting and standing can also be a solution for good posture and movement.
  • If you don’t have good posture or stand on your feet for too long, it may not be comfortable for your feet. Because everyone’s feet are different, each person will need different levels of support under his or her feet, which can include a standing mat as well as orthotic cushioning in the shoes. Those with certain overuse conditions, such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis, bunions or metatarsalgia can experience pain from long-term standing without appropriate support.

Do your best to get up and move around for every 30 minutes that you sit. If you feel that your mobility is limited by foot or ankle problems, or if you need extra support while using a standing desk, make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment and treatment at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505