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By Crofton Podiatry
October 11, 2018
Category: Bunion
Tags: high heels   flats   shoes   surgery   orthotic  

While the wrong types of shoes may not directly cause bunions, they can be the reason why they become worse. Long-term use of shoes that do not have the proper foot support can lead the bunion becoming larger, stiffer, and more painful.

So what actually causes bunions?

While the exact cause is unknown, it seems that genetics, injuries to the big toe joint, and excessive pressure to the forefoot causes the big toe to begin pointing toward the other toes. The bony spur develops as a response to direct pressure, improper healing, or as a support to the big toe joint.

Then what types of shoes make bunion symptoms worse?

  • High heels (higher than 2 inches) – Wearing high heels puts an extraneous strain on the forefoot, especially at the big toe joint. The extra pressure can cause inflammation and pain after even just a few minutes. Eventually, it can cause the bony spur to get bigger and more painful.
  • Narrow and/or pointed-toe shoes – While some shoes seem very fashionable and trendy by being pointy or narrow, it’s not actually the right shape for your feet. Forcing your feet to spend the day walking in narrow or pointy shoes can further force your big toe to point toward your other toes.
  • Tight shoes or shoes that are small for you - Don’t forget that your feet swell a little bit throughout the day, so it’s best to find shoes that fit you in the afternoon. Additionally, some shoes do not come in half sizes, so you may have to size up or down. Be careful with sizing down since your feet (and bunions) need space to feel comfortable.
  • Stiff, non-adjustable shoes – Shoes with elastic material, straps, or laces will allow you to adjust your shoes to comfort as the day goes on. Again, tight shoes will only make bunion symptoms worse! If your bunion becomes inflamed, you’ll want to give your feet some breathing room by adjusting them.
  • Flats – Ballerina flats and other flat shoes that do not have arch support can cause more pressure on the big toe joint. If you prefer to wear flats, try adding arch support inserts to feel more comfortable.

What is the lesson learned? If you have bunions, don’t make them worse with the wrong shoes. Try looking for footwear that is low-heeled, comfortable, roomy for your toes, supportive for your arches, and adjustable throughout the day.

Of course, those with severe bunions already should speak with our podiatrist for the best solution. You may need custom orthotic shoes to fit severely deformed feet. Surgery might even be necessary if bunions really get in the way of your life.

We can help you! Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Come to visit our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 08, 2018
Category: Foot health
Tags: swelling   Athlete's Foot   Gout   Orthotics   Diabetes   surgery   pain   arthritis   injury   psoriasis   fungal   ingrown   cracked heels  

There are some obvious times to visit a foot doctor:

  1. Foot injury – A podiatrist can help you find the best way to take care of foot injuries, with anything from orthotics to surgery.
  2. Ankle injury – Yep! Podiatrists also take care of ankle issues.
  3. Foot and ankle pain – If you suddenly notice pain or have ongoing pain that doesn’t seem to get better with time or at-home treatment, our podiatry team will help you figure out what’s going on.podiatrist

Beyond the more obvious reasons for visiting a podiatrist, some other very important times to call our office for foot health care are:

  1. Annual foot examinations – Some foot and ankle issues can arise with subtle symptoms. Catching a problem early can allow for a simpler intervention. Additionally, since a foot doctor is a fully-licensed medical professional, they can help diagnose other problems that may present symptoms affecting the feet. In fact, some patients learn about their diabetes after coming for a foot problem checkup.
  2. Conditions or diseases like arthritis, gout, or diabetes – Speaking of diabetes, folks with certain diseases can develop side effects that affect the feet. A podiatrist can help you manage symptoms like pain or numbness.
  3. Swelling or numbness – If you have swelling or numbness that is unexplained or persists for a long time, come in to check for underlying conditions.
  4. New deformities or changes in skin – Sometimes changes in the feet go unnoticed compared to changes in other parts of the body. That’s why it’s important to check the feet often for any changes that might need treatment. Additionally, severely dry, cracked heels, as well as other conditions like Athlete’s foot or psoriasis may require podiatrist help for treatment.
  5. Ingrown or fungal toenails – Most times, moderate to severe cases of ingrown or fungal toenails requires the attention of a podiatrist. Trying to treat these toenail conditions at home may be fruitless or even more harmful (e.g. trying to pry out ingrown toenails can lead to infection).

As you can see, there are many reasons why you might want to make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Please contact us and visit our podiatry team at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
March 20, 2018
Category: sports injuries

There are so many things to consider for your March Madness picks – how the teams have played in during their season, star athletes, and the team’s history in these postseason matchups. Now take a step back and take into consideration, the foot and ankle injuries that have plagued each team, and how that might affect your bracket picks.

Kentucky’s Jarred Vanderbilt, for example, was out with an ankle injury, and continued limping, several days later. Depending on the type of injury, ankles can heal quickly, but others can take as long as 6 weeks or more to heal, especially if it’s a severe ankle sprain.

Kansas State’s Dean Wade and Miami’s Bruce Brown, Jr. are both suffering from foot injuries that leave them in much uncertainty heading into the first few games. There’s a good chance they will have to sit out as their injuries heal and they are cleared to participate.

While you might have noticed that some of the previously injured college basketball stars are “healed” from their injuries, we want to caution you from getting your hopes too high. Most foot, ankle, and knee injuries may eventually feel good enough to play, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they are fully healed. It’s actually in these “almost 100%” times that a more serious re-injury can occur. Rehabilitative measures, such as an ankle brace and physical therapy might be necessary to get athletes back to 100%.

Depending on the severity of the injuries the athletes incur, they may need many weeks of rest, immobilization, or even surgery to ensure that they have a future career, even beyond the NCAA tournament.

Got inspired by March Madness and went to play some pickup basketball? For mild or moderate injuries, request an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. Our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry can assess your injury and find you the right treatment. Our friendly podiatric team looks forward to seeing you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 31, 2018
Category: sports injuries

It’s official – The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots will go head to head for the Vince Lombardi Trophy!

While talent, hard work, and teamwork are major factors that will determine who wins, injuries can end up really changing the outcome. Below, we discuss some common football injuries to watch for as you’re rooting for your team of choice:

  • Knee Injuries – The most common football injuries include tears in the ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament), MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament), and/or the meniscus. These can come from blunt lateral impact or quick jukes, during which you may hear a “pop” from the knee. If injuries are severe enough, it can take the athletes out of the game or even the majority of the season as surgery and rehabilitation may be required.
  • Shoulder Injuries – A tackle, collision, or fall on the shoulder or arm can lead to a serious shoulder injury. Even if football players wear shoulder pads, they can still experience shoulder dislocations or separations in the rotator cuffs. Depending on the severity of the injury, it can take a long time to allow the injury to heal and renew flexibility and strength.
  • Ankle Injuries – Because of the many directions in which the ankle moves, there are many tendons and ligaments involved in the players’ actions, which also means that jumping, running, juking, or opponents’ tackles can cause ankle injuries like sprains or broken ankles. Overuse injuries like Achilles tendonitis can also cause chronic pain that can get worse without proper treatment (maybe even surgery) and healing time. Ankle braces are helpful for those that have repeat injuries.
  • Foot Injuries – Toes, the midfoot (metatarsal), and the heel bones are also at high risk of blunt trauma and overuse injuries. With the constant forces on the feet, football players can endure black toenails as well as bone fractures

So whichever team you’re rooting for, let’s hope that someone on that team doesn’t sustain an injury that takes him out of the championship game! If you get inspired to play a pickup game, be sure to take safety measures and warm up. Worried about an injury? Make an appointment by calling our office at (410) 721-4505. You can consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry for an assessment and treatment. Our team is ready to assist you at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.

By Crofton Podiatry
August 02, 2017
Category: Childrens Feet
Tags: surgery   clubfoot  

What is clubfoot?

Clubfoot is congenital deformity that is found in about one newborn for every 1,000 live births. The infant is born with one or both feet turned inward, changing the shape and/or positioning of the foot.  This deformity can be identified during pregnancy or right after birth, since the foot is so abnormally shaped. Genetics and environmental factors seem to play a big part in whether or not a child is born with clubfoot.

How do you treat clubfoot?

The baby’s doctor will be able to begin treatment almost immediately. If left untreated, quality of life can be severely impacted, since the child’s mobility will be compromised. Treating the deformity early can make it easier to correct the problem, since babies are more flexible compared to when their bodies develop and bones begin to harden.

Typically successful methods of treatment include:

Ponseti method – This method includes one or two sessions per week of stretching the child’s foot to the correct positioning, and then casting it. Since they are still very flexible while they are babies, it is easier to get the feet to the correct position before they develop and set. This resetting and casting can happen over several months. Toward the end, your podiatrist may need to perform surgery to correct the length of the Achilles tendon.

French Functional method – This physical therapy method includes 3 sessions per week over several months. The process includes stretching, mobilization, and taping to slowly move the foot into the correct position. Exercise and massage helps to coax the foot back into the right shape and place, and then a plastic splint is placed to keep the foot in place.

Both methods are found to be successful, but only if the parents continue to stretch, exercise, and brace the foot and ankle to retain the correct position.

In the case where the above methods do not work, surgery might be necessary. The tendons may need to be adjusted to the right size and position as well. Afterward, the child will require a cast. If treatment is not started early, bones may need restructuring as well.

Was your child born with clubfoot or other congenital foot disorder? Consult with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. Make an appointment by calling (410) 721-4505. Our team is ready to assist you and your family at our Crofton, MD office, which also serves the surrounding Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas.




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2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505