(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

Posts for tag: warts

Heading to the beach this weekend? Don’t forget to put sunblock on your feet too!

There’s a reason why your skin is the body’s largest organ. It covers every inch of us, giving us information about the outside world, through the magic of touch. But that also means that in addition to soft and cuddly sensations, the skin is also exposed to harsh elements like the sun, rough surfaces, friction from shoes, pathogens, and anything you might be allergic to.

The skin on your feet are susceptible to the following:

  • Blisters, rash, or hives: Allergies can cause your skin to react to certain substances like sock materials or grass. You may feel itchy at the contact location, and pain if blisters occur in response to allergic contact dermatitis.
  • Athlete’s foot: Dry, itchy skin near the toes (as with Athlete’s foot) can be caused by the fungus, tinea. The same fungus can get into the toenails, causing brittle, discolored toenails, or fungal toenails.
  • Rash: Athlete’s foot can be a cause for a rash on the feet, but autoimmune skin diseases like eczema and psoriasis can also cause dry, itchy, scaly skin and rash.
  • Corns and calluses: These are caused by chronic friction, typically on the toes or near the balls of the feet. As a preventative measure, the skin thickens and can become painful and unsightly.
  • Smelly feet: Foot odor usually occurs when there is an overgrowth of bacteria or fungi. They can be contracted in communal areas such as locker rooms or community pools and can live in your socks and shoes. If you tend to sweat throughout the day, especially if you have hyperhidrosis, there’s a good chance that the bacteria and fungi thrive and make things stinky. They can also cause an infection!
  • Infection: Any cuts, scrapes, or large wounds are susceptible to attack by bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Any open skin allows for pathogens to enter and cause problems for your skin, including ulcers.
  • Warts: If you an open wound on your foot comes into contact with a surface in which someone else with warts has touched it, you are at risk of getting warts on your feet too. They can come and go on their own, but warts can become painful and continue to live in your body if not properly treated.
  • Malignant melanoma: While not commonly found on the foot, it is still possible to find an unusual looking mole on your feet, especially if your feet are often exposed to the sun.
  • Dry skin and heels: Just like the rest of your skin, your feet might become dry as well. The most commonly dry area of your feet is the heel. When you’ve got heel fissures, your heels can become dry and cracked, even causing you pain.

If you’ve noticed some changes in the skin of your feet, make an appointment at our Crofton, MD office to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. At Crofton Podiatry, we will use the latest treatment options to assess and take care of your foot and ankle care needs. Our Crofton, MD office serves the surrounding areas of Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 11, 2018
Category: Foot Care Tips

The weather may still be a bit wonky and unpredictable, but that doesn’t mean that your toes don’t deserve some pampering in preparation for spring and summer! For men and women alike, a pedicure can be a great tool for grooming and keeping the feet looking and feeling great.

However, there are times when pedicures can be harmful, rather than helpful. Depending on the health and hygiene practices of each nail salon (or yourself), a pedicure can result in ugly fungal toenails or a bacterial skin infection on your foot.

So what can you do to avoid a “bad” pedicure? Review the following safety tips when getting your toenails done:

  • DIY pedicure: One of the safest ways to give yourself a pedicure is to do it yourself. Having your own set of tools makes it easier to make sure that you do not become infected with someone else’s disease. Make sure to soak your toes in warm water before you begin, use tools gently so that you don’t hurt yourself, cut toenails straight across (not rounded), and moisturize the feet after your toenails are dry.
  • FIRST!: If you’ve seen this on a social media platform, it means that someone wanted to be the first to comment on a post. In this case, we encourage you to try and be the FIRST to get their nails done for that day. This would (likely) ensure that you are getting sanitized tools and no one else has shared the footbath with you.
  • Don’t be THAT person: Who, might you ask, is giving me this fear of infection? Well, it could be anyone! This also means that it can be YOU! If you have a fungal (i.e. Athlete’s foot or fungal toenails), a bacterial (which causes smelly feet), or viral (i.e. warts) infection, try to reschedule your appointment. If you cannot, let one of the pedicurists know so that they can take appropriate steps to protect other people’s feet.
  • Diabetic foot care: This includes getting pedicures done or having our podiatrist take care of this. Diabetic patients should be extra careful, especially if they have diabetic neuropathy. Not only is it possible that they will not feel a cut or other injury, it might also take longer to heal said cut/injury.

We have seen patients come in after a botched pedicure job or getting an infection from going to a nail salon. If you need treatment for a pedicure gone wrong, make an appointment to come see us. Call our office at (410) 721-4505 to see our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry. He can assess your feet and find you the proper treatment. Our Crofton, MD office also serves the surrounding areas in Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD.

By Crofton Podiatry
January 19, 2017
Tags: warts   plantar warts   verrucus   contagious   virus  

Have you been contending with warts for a while now? Perhaps they keep coming back or appearing in new areas. Maybe plantar warts, or verrucas, are causing you pain because they are on the part of the foot that you have to put pressure on when you walk. Well, Dr. Brad Toll at Crofton Podiatry can help!

What Are Plantar Warts and Where Did You Get Them?

Warts in general are contagious. They are a manifestation of the viruses that through breaks in the skin and cause a change in your skin’s appearance and sometimes be painful. On other parts of the skin, there can be a white bump with small black dots in the middle. Plantar warts, however are on the bottom of your feet and usually are not raised from the skin (not a bump).

You can get them from anyone else who has been affected by it, making you susceptible to infection whenever you are barefoot. Skin-to-skin contact, sharing towels, and walking on the same shower floor as someone else with plantar warts are ways in which you can be infected.

What Are Your Treatment Options?

Sometimes, verrucas can go away without any treatment. However, that does not mean that the virus has left your body. In fact, it can live in your body for a while.

If you have pain or other reason to treat your plantar wart(s), your at-home options include: salicylic acid treatment in the form of creams or gels, and duct tape over the wart for a few days to smother the wart.

At the office, treatment options include cryotherapy, surgery, chemical treatments, or in some cases, laser cautery.

For the best way to take care of your painful or pesky plantar warts, make an appointment by calling us at (410) 721-4505. Our board-certified podiatrist will assess and treat you at our Crofton, MD office, which serves Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie areas as well.

 

Germany’s 1-0 victory over Argentina in extra time was watched by 17.324 million viewers this past World Cup, marking it the most-watched men’s soccer final ever.  The match also set a new Twitter record, with nearly 618,725 tweets per minute at the final buzzer toll, and totaling over 32.1 million tweets throughout the course of the game. However, since the impressive international soccer feats are complete for the year, it’s time to return our attention to their feet of our own soccer players at home (or any other summer sport player for that matter).

Foot and ankle problems are extremely common in children, and oftentimes may go unnoticed or unreported. Many times this is due to the subtle nature in which these problems present themselves, and other times it simply has to do with the resiliency of a child’s body, and their difficulty in communicating health issues. To combat this, the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgery has outlined important warning signs parents should watch out for in their children.

1.      Children not keeping up with their peers in activities

2.      Children voluntarily withdrawing from activities they would usually enjoy

3.      Children being nervous about showing their feet

4.      Children who seem overly prone to tripping or falling

5.      Child complaining of any persistent pain in their feet

If you notice that your child seems to fit any of the above 5 characteristics, it is important that they get prompt examination by a foot specialist. Additionally, common problems such as warts, disfigured nails, and shoe-wear advice are routine care for a foot specialist and also warrant proper diagnosis and treatment. As always, for the most up to date and patient specific information regarding you or your child’s foot health contact your local foot specialist for an appointment today. And if you’re in the Bowie or Crofton area, stop by our office at Crofton Podiatry.

By Brad Toll.




Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505