(410) 721-4505



2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Archive:

Tags

By Crofton Podiatry
May 08, 2019
Category: Foot Pain

While many of us work at desk jobs, many others do not. Still, it is not uncommon for us to develop sore feet not from a callus or other medical malady, but from simple overuse. Careers that require long periods of standing or walking such as construction, sports, medicine or education see tired feet as a normal, but not welcome part of the job. So how do we deal with this? I suggest the following:

Ways to Soothe Tired and Achy Feet:

  • Soak your feet – soak your feet in a tub of warm water mixed with Epsom salt. Soak for about 20 minutes. This can relieve sore muscles and reduce swelling. 1 cup of Epsom salt to a tub of warm water.
  • Stretch – slowly stretch your foot muscles including your toes and ankle careful not to over extend each. Slow, steady pressure in one direction will gradually loosen tight muscles and promote the free flow of blood in your circulatory system replenishing all important red blood cells.
  • Get a foot massage – sit and rub the bottom of your feet careful to treat the whole sole. Include your toes and calves.
  • Soak in ice – with painful and swollen feet you can also soak them in a combination of ice and water. 
  • Cushion your feet – use an insole or orthotic to properly support and/or cushion your feet.
  • Proper fitting shoes – check your footwear to make sure they are the proper size and provide proper support especially in the arches. If not, get new footwear. Your podiatrist can make suggestions.

Sore feet are a common occurrence and are a valid reason to see your podiatrist. Doing so will ensure that the problem is relatively minor unless other conditions are contributing to your discomfort.

If you’re suffering from sore feet or have any other concerns about your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
May 01, 2019
Category: toe deformities

If you’ve ever looked at your feet and notice your toes bending at the joints, you may have hammertoes. Hammertoes is a condition caused by an imbalance of the muscles, bones and ligaments that keep your toes straight.

Causes may include:

  • Improper footwear – not wearing proper fitting shoes
  • Genetics – foot issues can be passed down from other relatives
  • Foot diseases – People with arthritis and diabetes can develop hammertoes
  • Toe length – a longer toe may be bent by hitting the front of the shoe
  • Sex – women tend to get hammertoes more than men
  • Age – Hammertoes is more prevalent as people get older
  • Sudden trauma – an injury can cause the toes to bend at the knuckles.

Indications of Hammertoe include:

  • Pain and swelling – the bending of the toe will result in irritation and pain
  • Inability to move the toe – with swelling it will be difficult to move or straighten
  • Corns and/or calluses – constant wearing of skin against another toe
  • Open sore – if enough contact is being made a sore may develop

There are a few things you can do short of surgery including stretching your toes before you put your shoes on, making sure you have proper fitting shoes, using a store-bought insole, adding padding and taking a pain med like Tylenol. A podiatrist can administer a cortisone shot for pain.  Your podiatrist can also fashion a custom orthotic for you.

If none of them help, then you may need surgery. If so, you podiatrist will confirm this with you. Surgery could include the following:

  • Arthroplasty – removal of a half of the joint
  • Arthrodesis – removal of a whole joint
  • Basal phalangectomy - removing the base of the bone under the big toe

If you believe you have hammertoes and they ate bothering you or have any other concerns about your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

 

 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 24, 2019
Category: Footwear
Tags: podiatrist   hiking boots   running shoe   proper fit   feet  

When it comes to spending time outdoors, activities like camping, fishing and hiking require a different type of footwear, one more durable and especially designed for more rugged activity.

Hiking boots can be broken down into three main categories. They are:

  • Low cut and light weight – very near a running shoe with basic cushioning.
  • Day hiking boots – Usually a mid-ankle type of footwear that provides more ankle support and will usually have a more aggressive sole. Used for midday hikes with a light backpack.
  • Backpacking boots – Mid ankle to high footwear designed to carry heavy loads with the most aggressive tread.

Hiking boots can be made of many different materials depending on what and how you plan to use them. Among them are full grain leather, synthetic and waterproof materials. Boots can also be insulated to protect against the cold and frostbite especially important if you plan on using them during the winter or in inclement weather.  

Tips for choosing the right boot:

  • Know your size – Measure your foot in the store.
  • Wear the right socks – wear the socks you plan on using with the boot for a proper fit.  
  • Boots should be snug and supportive– Your foot should be comfortably snug like a regular shoe, especially with the laces tied firmly. They should also provide proper support for walking on hard surfaces or long lengths of time.
  • Proper laces – choose braided laces if you can, avoiding leather or cloth. Both the latter eventually rip and tear, very frustrating if you’re on the trail and they suddenly break.
  • Try new boots on at the end of the day – Your feet swell by late afternoon, so make sure they fit when they are a little bigger.

One more important aspect of the boot is the tread. Often the heavier the boot, the more aggressive the tread, but this is not always true. Know the kind of surface you’re going to be walking on, staying away from a hard and slippery tread if you’re going to walk on rocks or other possibly smooth surfaces. A softer and more flexible tread would be better.  

If you have any questions about choosing the proper footwear or have any other questions about your feet, call our office and make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and the make the appropriate suggestions or find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

There are many reasons why you might find yourself limping due to pain in your feet or toes. It could be a bunion, callus or corn all of which are quite treatable. One, though, may require more than average especially if it’s not taken care of. An Ingrown toenail may sound somewhat minor to the average person, but if not taken care of can require surgery to fix, something most people will want to avoid if possible and do if needed.

An ingrown toenail is when your toenail starts to grow into the actual toe groove causing pain and discomfort. What may start out to be a slight issue can quickly escalate.

Causes of Ingrown Toenails include:

  • Poor fitting shoes – shoes that are too tight at the toes not allowing for growth and pushing the nails inward.
  • Poor trimming – nails that are not trimmed properly can grow this way.
  • Family History – a history of ingrown toenails in your family can be passed on to relatives.
  • Trauma – trauma to the toes may case nails to grow inward.

Symptoms of an ingrown toenail include redness, swelling, pain and possible drainage from an ongoing infection. Any or all of these can indicate an ingrown toenail. In other words, if the toenail is ingrown you will know it by how it looks and feels.

If you do have an ingrown toenail you will want to see your podiatrist as they are best trained to assess and treat them. You want to catch it before it progresses too far, and surgery is needed. To avoid getting them you will want to do the following.

  • Wash your feet with anti-bacterial soap to keep feet and toes clean and dry.
  • Cut your nails straight across, not on a curve.
  • Cut them when they are soft like after a bath or shower.
  • Wear proper fitting shoes not too tight or too loose at the toes.

Treatment beyond trimming the nails could include the podiatrist cutting out the sides of the toenails to stop the ingrown nail from growing further which in most cases is quite successful.

If you believe you have an ingrown toenail or any other concerns with your feet, call our office and make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

By Crofton Podiatry
April 09, 2019
Category: sports injuries

With more and more activity coming this Spring, athletes often develop foot problems. Three of the most common include Turf Toe, Stress fractures and Tarsal Tunnel syndrome

Turf Toe

Turf toe is a sprain of the big toe from excessive upward bending of the big toe. Jamming the toe or repeated push-offs when running or jumping can also cause Turf Toe. Sports such as basketball, running, football, tennis, soccer, wrestling, dancing and gymnastics are often prone to this. Turf toe is common on artificial turf.

Treatment for Turf Toe includes:

  • Rest – Temporarily stopping the activity causing the pain.
  • Ice – putting ice on the affected area for 20 to 30 minutes 3 times a day until the pain disappears.
  • Compression and elevation – wrapping the toe to stabilize and support it and keeping it elevated above your heart when at rest.
  • Surgery – in the most extreme cases surgery may be needed.

Stress fractures are caused by sudden force which causes a split in the bones. Fractures can also occur with repeated lower force trauma to the foot. Poor diet and menstrual irregularities can also contribute to fractures as do bulimia and anorexia since they all affect bone health.

Treatment for a Stress fracture includes:

  • Rest – Stopping your activity will allow your fracture to heal.
  • Ice – place ice on the effected area the recommended 20 to 30 minutes, 3 times a day until better.
  • Better fitting footwear – wear footwear that strongly supports your feet.
  • Increase activity slowly – when healed do not rush back to the same level of activity. Slowly build your workout according to how you feel.

The third condition athletes can suffer from is Tarsal Tunnel syndrome. Tarsal Tunnel is when the posterior tibial nerve in the space between your bones and tissue is pinched causing the base of your foot to go numb.

Treatment includes:

  • Pain meds – anti-inflammatory medicine.
  • Cortisone – shots of this pain reliever in the foot.
  • Better fitting footwear – Wearing more supportive footwear. See your podiatrist for recommendations.
  • Surgery –a podiatrist will cut the tarsal tunnel and relieve pressure on the tibial nerve.

What is good about these is that they can all be successfully treated with a visit to your podiatrist.

If you believe you may any of the above conditions or any other concerns with your feet, make an appointment with our board-certified podiatrist, Dr. Brad Toll. He will assess your feet and find the appropriate treatments. Call Crofton Podiatry at (410) 721-4505, which provides services to Crofton, Gambrills, Odenton, and Bowie, MD areas. 

 





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.


Call Today (410) 721-4505

2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25
Crofton, MD 21114

Podiatrist - Crofton, Crofton Podiatry, 2411 Crofton Lane, Suite 25, Crofton MD, 21114 (410) 721-4505